Best way to Chamfer panels sheets? - Router Forums
 
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post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-13-2011, 02:58 AM Thread Starter
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Default Best way to Chamfer panels sheets?

I'm fairly new to woodworking and was wondering what is the best (fastest, easiest and most accurate) way to make 45 degree bevels on already cut to size panels. The panels would be 19mm (2/3 inches) MDF, with 0.4mm veneer on both sides (therefore accuracy is important).

I've got an 8ft cnc router, but it's only good for panels that haven't been cut to size as it never seems to accurately 'seek' the zero x&y axis of the sheet. Anyway, this is for commercial purposes so I wouldn't mind buying pro machinery to do this (apart from getting a better cnc router).

I used a handheld router years ago, but I remember that it had a bearing to 'ride' on a template. Obviously there would be nothing to ride on when making chamfers?

Thanks for any tips!
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post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-13-2011, 03:59 AM Thread Starter
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Sorry I meant 26mm (1 inch) panels. Would I be able to do this in 1 pass?
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post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-14-2011, 12:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Baller View Post
I'm fairly new to woodworking and was wondering what is the best (fastest, easiest and most accurate) way to make 45 degree bevels on already cut to size panels. The panels would be 19mm (2/3 inches) MDF, with 0.4mm veneer on both sides (therefore accuracy is important).

I've got an 8ft cnc router, but it's only good for panels that haven't been cut to size as it never seems to accurately 'seek' the zero x&y axis of the sheet. Anyway, this is for commercial purposes so I wouldn't mind buying pro machinery to do this (apart from getting a better cnc router).

I used a handheld router years ago, but I remember that it had a bearing to 'ride' on a template. Obviously there would be nothing to ride on when making chamfers?

Thanks for any tips!
.

Chamfering an edge only requires a straightedge or guide fence attached to the router, or, if your piece is small, placed against the fence on a table.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-14-2011, 11:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Baller View Post
I'm fairly new to woodworking and was wondering what is the best (fastest, easiest and most accurate) way to make 45 degree bevels on already cut to size panels. The panels would be 19mm (2/3 inches) MDF, with 0.4mm veneer on both sides (therefore accuracy is important).

I've got an 8ft cnc router, but it's only good for panels that haven't been cut to size as it never seems to accurately 'seek' the zero x&y axis of the sheet. Anyway, this is for commercial purposes so I wouldn't mind buying pro machinery to do this (apart from getting a better cnc router).

I used a handheld router years ago, but I remember that it had a bearing to 'ride' on a template. Obviously there would be nothing to ride on when making chamfers?

Thanks for any tips!
Hi - Welcome to the forum

Unless I'm missing something one of these should do the job:
MLCS Chamfer Router Bits

The bearing rides on the stock controlling the cut.
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post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-15-2011, 09:43 AM
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I would use a router table and fence with a chamfering bit. The table and fence should provide very good accuracy. A quick pass on all 4 edges should be quick, accurate, and easy.

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post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 06-15-2011, 10:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baller View Post
I'm fairly new to woodworking and was wondering what is the best (fastest, easiest and most accurate) way to make 45 degree bevels on already cut to size panels. The panels would be 19mm (2/3 inches) MDF, with 0.4mm veneer on both sides (therefore accuracy is important).

I've got an 8ft cnc router, but it's only good for panels that haven't been cut to size as it never seems to accurately 'seek' the zero x&y axis of the sheet. Anyway, this is for commercial purposes so I wouldn't mind buying pro machinery to do this (apart from getting a better cnc router).

I used a handheld router years ago, but I remember that it had a bearing to 'ride' on a template. Obviously there would be nothing to ride on when making chamfers?

Thanks for any tips!

If you're cutting a chamfer, then a chamfer trim bit (i.e. bearing on bottom) in a handheld (or table) would be the way to go; however, it sounds like want to cut a miter (not a chamfer). If you want to cut a miter, the easiest way would be to use a chamfering bit in a table. Once setup properly, you can quickly make accurate and repeatable cuts.

If you don't have a table, or if you prefer, you can use a handheld router and a guide (clamped to the panel); however, you will need to set it up for every cut. This isn't too difficult if you make "setback blocks". Clamp a guide to a piece os scrap and make the miter cut. Then measure the distance from the far edge (bottom) of the cut to the guide bar. Make two pieces of wood this long and then use them to set the guidebar on another piece of scrap. make another test cut and adjust the the setback blocks until they're perfect (or good enough). Keep these blocks and mark them for intended purpose, bit used and router used (even if you only have one - you might buy another ... ).

FYI:
A chamfer is an angled cut (usually 45°) between two perpedicular surfaces. A miter is an angled cut (usually 45°) between two parallel surfaces (like the sides of a box, or a picture frame) and is usually for creating a joint without showing end grain. Chamfers are for aesthetics, or safety (e.g. removing a sharp corner on a piece of metal).

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