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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-01-2011, 12:37 PM Thread Starter
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Default rotozip vs router

Hi guys
I recently purchased a rotozip saw and upon unpacking it found it difficult to use, not like a router. I find the bits do not cut and if one forces it the bit will run on you or will burn. Like a router you should use a guide to insure straighty cuts. The difficulty I am having is getting the rotozip to cut is seems to just burn. any I have read the instructions but they are vague at best. Any suggestions

Tom:
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-01-2011, 12:50 PM
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Hello Tom! I have had and used a RotoZip for years. I used mine in building, adding an addition! It is awkward at best. They have a poor base that is not very sturdy I made a base type plate, that was attached to a table, I cur all My vinyl siding, and it worked well. Have You checked for a base plate to mount it in? I remember, I believe, a base that allows You to use it easier. I think You would have a fine tool if You can buy a good mount for it. I wish You well. There are other small routers in the market that are supposed to be real good.I wish I could tell You more, sorry!

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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-01-2011, 10:38 PM
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There are two types of cutting bits, One is guide point and the other is sabre cut. The burning is usually a guide point not penetrating thru the material. The tool was developed originally to cut electrical boxes out in drywall. With the drywall hung and run over the electrical box the roto zip is used to circumvent the box with the guide point bit. If using the sabre cut bit freehand it will jump and is difficult to manage
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-01-2011, 11:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tmarvin View Post
Hi guys
I recently purchased a rotozip saw and upon unpacking it found it difficult to use, not like a router. I find the bits do not cut and if one forces it the bit will run on you or will burn. Like a router you should use a guide to insure straighty cuts. The difficulty I am having is getting the rotozip to cut is seems to just burn. any I have read the instructions but they are vague at best. Any suggestions

Tom:
Hi Tom - Welcome to the forum
I think Bill is onto something. The guidepoint bit flutes do not extend all the way to the tip, there is about an 1/8 of an inch of "guidepoint" on the end with no cutting edges. I have also found the Rotozip to be something of a pain to manage. For one thing, they have less mass than even the laminate trimmers and the base and any guide accessories you may acquire are flimsy at best. Another thing about Rotozip bits, according to Bosch, all bits need to "breath", that is, be completely through cuts to allow the end of the tip to disipate heat. If you notice, they are all downcut to boot.

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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-02-2011, 08:00 AM
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After working with Rotozip tools on a jobsite I learned what they did well, which was cut sheetrock and suspended ceiling panels, and what they did not cut very well, which was plywood paneling and wood. They cut it, but it was a very rough cut. All of it was done freehand, and when cutting there was considerable side pull similar to what happens when you try to increase a hole size with an electric drill and a twist bit. After gaining experience with Rotozip I never bought one for my shop. They have uses, but not enough to justify the cost, at least for me.

A few years back my daughter-in-law wanted help cutting out large drawings of cartoon characters from 1/4 luan plywood. I tried using a sabre saw (hand held jig saw) and decided that it just wasn't right for the job, so I installed an adapter and a Rotozip bit in an old Makita plunge router. Laying the plywood on some sheet foam insulation I was able to cut out these characters with a minimum of chipout and when cutting it slow I discovered that the side pull was very manageable. The project turned out very well, and I discovered a way to use Rotozip bits successfully. The foam backing does a great job of keeping the bit from hitting anything solid, holds the sawdust, and most importantly, it keeps the edges of the cut from having the significant chipout that had turned me off to the Rotozip system so many years ago. I still don't own a Rotozip, but do keep the 1/4-1/8 adapter and some Rotozip bits in my shop now. They still aren't for precision cuts, but they have their place in woodworking.

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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-02-2011, 08:34 AM
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I do not own one and only used one once,not sure I will ever buy one, it will cut sheetrock well

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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-02-2011, 09:27 AM
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RotoZip's and other brands of spiral saws are designed to cut drywall. The reason for the down spiral on the bits is to channel the dust behind what you are cutting; this means less clean up and a clear field of vision. Spiral saws are a real bonus to drywall installers saving them lots of time.
Consider the differences between drywall and wood. Drywall is powder that has been molded and held together with two sheets of paper. Wood has fibers running in different directions so it is more difficult to cut; these fibers tend to deflect the bit's path when powder does not. You can prove this by making a free hand cut in drywall and then pine. We know spiral cutting bits make cleaner cuts and less tear out than straight edged bits because of the shearing action; at the same time they remove less material. If you are cutting drywall the 1/8" bits work great. If you are cutting wood it helps to use the 1/4" bits so you remove more material at a slower speed. All routers need guides and the larger the router the more control you have since the added weight helps to steady your cut. Spiral saws are designed to be used one handed and often overhead so the weight needs to be kept to a minimum. This guarantee's less control so a guide becomes more important. Like any router you have to make your cuts so the bit is pulling into the fence/guide. You can greatly improve directional control by adding a 1/4" thick square base to the end of your spiral saw with epoxy so it is easier to guide: keep the opening in the center as large as possible for visibility and dust evacuation. 1/4" Masonite or plastic works great for this. Don't try to force the cut, let the bit work.

Using these thoughts I found it very easy to cut a sofit vent in 3/4" pine. I used the 1/4" Sabercut bit in my RotoZip with a strip of 1 x 2" as a guide. The facia board overlapped the edge making it very difficult to cut this any other way; no room for a jig saw and not enough vertical clearance for my TigerSaw. (PC version of a SawZall or bayonet saw) Working in close quarters is where spiral saws excel.

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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-02-2011, 10:00 AM
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Hi

I use a Rotozip with router speed control device all the time,with 1/4" shank router bits, you can make a clear base for one easy that will help control the tool.

Base, drill a pocket hole to hold the metal base in and with two or 3 lawn mower cable clamps with nuts you have a new bigger base plate and yes you can plunge the Rotozip..

You can also use it with the D Handle or drop it in a router table just like the bigger routers..with a quick stick fence you have a little router table setup, with the clamp on the base you can set the height just like the big boys can do.



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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-02-2011, 05:02 PM
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roto zip table below is usefull for shaving material from small blocks safely It is useful in making templates It will cut 1/4" plywood if used as pattern bit slow rpms and cuts plastic as well I dunno it works for me
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 08-17-2011, 10:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paduke View Post
roto zip table below is usefull for shaving material from small blocks safely It is useful in making templates It will cut 1/4" plywood if used as pattern bit slow rpms and cuts plastic as well I dunno it works for me
Hi, I am looking to make a similar attachment for my rotozip. I want to redo the edges on a wooden drum shell with a 45 degree routing bit, and wanted to make an affordable routing table with my rotozip.

Would you be able to give me some pointers on how to do so? I am not really well versed in tools or woodworking. But I think I can figure it out with some guidance.

Thanks!
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