what do you use to clean bits? - Router Forums
 3Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-14-2011, 08:06 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
allthunbs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Country: Canada
First Name: Ron
Posts: 2,881
 
Default what do you use to clean bits?

As part of the discussion on helix planer heads at:

http://www.routerforums.com/tools-wo...tml#post245634

one of the requirements of Helix planer heads is that they be perfectly clean. To clean my router bits I'm using a concoction from Rockler called Pitch and Resin Remover. At $10.59 US plus shipping and taxes, this can quickly become an expensive situation.

Cleaning pitch and resin off of tools is not new and must be a problem since the beginning of cutting tools.

What do you use?

Do you have a concoction that your grandfather taught you and you're using even today?

Do you soak your tools or do you "spray" or do you brush?

Along those lines, do you clean your collet chucks the same way?

Are there alternatives to cleaning, i.e. do you pre-treat your bits.

Do you have a separate concoction for saw blades or "does one size fit all?"

Your comments are appreciated.

Allthunbs
allthunbs is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-14-2011, 09:47 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 3,046
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by allthunbs View Post
As part of the discussion on helix planer heads at:

http://www.routerforums.com/tools-wo...tml#post245634

one of the requirements of Helix planer heads is that they be perfectly clean. To clean my router bits I'm using a concoction from Rockler called Pitch and Resin Remover. At $10.59 US plus shipping and taxes, this can quickly become an expensive situation.

Cleaning pitch and resin off of tools is not new and must be a problem since the beginning of cutting tools.

What do you use?

Do you have a concoction that your grandfather taught you and you're using even today?

Do you soak your tools or do you "spray" or do you brush?

Along those lines, do you clean your collet chucks the same way?

Are there alternatives to cleaning, i.e. do you pre-treat your bits.

Do you have a separate concoction for saw blades or "does one size fit all?"

Your comments are appreciated.
Hi Ron - I essentially use the same stuff, Rockler Pitch and Resin Remover. However, I buy the concentrate. $14/qt but mixes with water at 4:1 giving a 1 gallon (US) yield. The mix is also reusable so I use it for the soak. Most of it is in a large, lidded pan to handle saw blades and the rest in a pint canning jar to handle the router bits. Been using this batch for a little over a year now. I also have a squirt bottle of CMT cleaner for quickie touch ups.
That said, I have been cleaning router bits after every use. Just a wipe down with a towel moistened with whatever household cleaner I happen to have, 409, Fantastic, Mean Green.... etc. If there is anything that won't come off there, I spray it with a bit of the CMT cleaner and leave it set for a few minutes and wipe it off. I also use a brass brush at this time. So far I haven't had to go to any greater lengths.
Saw blades get cleaned and waxed whenever they come off the saw for any reason. Usually a spritz with the CMT cleaner and a 15 minute wait time is sufficient. When I first started on the Rockler cleaner, an overnite soak cleaned up everything. Remove router bearings before they go in the soup.
Sorry, I haven't got a planer so have no idea how to deal with those.

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.

Last edited by jschaben; 08-14-2011 at 09:49 AM.
jschaben is offline  
post #3 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-14-2011, 11:48 AM
Registered User
 
Gene Howe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Country: United States
First Name: Gene
Posts: 9,593
 
Default

Like John, I use 409 or Simple Green on saw blades and router bits.
Also, definitely heed John's caution to be careful with caustic stuff and router bit bearings. Soaking will degrease them and make them useless/dangerous.

Gene Howe
Snowflake, AZ

'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

Please edit your profile with a name and location so we can better assist you and make for a friendlier forum.
Gene Howe is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-14-2011, 11:48 AM
Registered User
 
Phil P's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: Phil
Posts: 2,117
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by allthunbs View Post
To clean my router bits I'm using a concoction from Rockler called Pitch and Resin Remover. At $10.59 US plus shipping and taxes, this can quickly become an expensive situation.
Hi Ron

I've used an industrial compound called "Aqueous Solution" for years. It comes in 1 gallon/5 litre bottles of concentrate and is diluted for use. It is a citrus-based solution which can safely be tipped down the drain after use (according to the COSHH notes accompanying it), unlike the turps, meths or paraffin concotions used by our grandfathers. It also works quicker, IMHO. A near match for it would be the CMT Orange bit cleaner.

I tend to spritz on (to router cutters) and then get to work with an old toothbrush and tooth picks; heavier deposits require a soaking. Like John I always remove bearings before cleaning - they get a separate treatment of wiping the outsides with a cloth dampened with white spirits (to remove contact adhesive which won't rub off with a coarse cloth) followed by a quick spritz of WD-40. Collets and collet nuts get the same treatment as cutters, albeit using a brass wire brush for the insides. The router cone gets cleaned with a soft cloth and neat cleaner from time to time. Saw blades are left to soak in a tray of solution overnight before applying the brush/toothpicks; planer blades get the same treatment (it's simpler to take stuff off at the end of a session, leave it in soak and then clean, dry, oil and refit the following day). In all cases except for bearings I use BoeShield protective oil afterwards if the item is being stored

I'm sorry to say that I don't think there's any way to pre-treat bits to make them stay clean. By its nature wood contains sticky resins, as do MDF and particle board (melamine, chipboard, etc). Teflon-coated bits do stay cleaner - until the first time they are sharpened when half of the coating always seems to disappear.

I don't clean my tools every time they are used, instead I look for signs of a build-up and treat them then - to clean each tool each and every time it is used would be a nightmare in both time and cost terms

Regards

Phil
Phil P is offline  
post #5 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-14-2011, 12:37 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Country: United States
First Name: Bj
Posts: 23,786
       
bobj3 is offline  
post #6 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-15-2011, 12:15 PM
Registered User
 
derek willis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: Derek
Posts: 988
 
Default

Cellulose thinners!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



A friend is a good egg even if they are slightly cracked!

Derek
derek willis is offline  
post #7 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-15-2011, 12:22 PM
Registered User
 
bobbotron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Rob
Posts: 231
 
Default

I usually just use mineral spirits, it gets them pretty clean, and it's not too toxic, as far as cleaners go...
bobbotron is offline  
post #8 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-15-2011, 12:26 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Country: United States
First Name: Bj
Posts: 23,786
       
Default

http://www.birdbrand.co.uk/msds/Cell...20Thinners.pdf

======

Quote:
Originally Posted by derek willis View Post
Cellulose thinners!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"

Marc Sommerfeld Tools ,Videos
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT-n...RWaEpMA/videos

Find all threads started by bobj3
http://www.routerforums.com/search.php?searchid=944097


bobj3 is offline  
post #9 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-15-2011, 03:24 PM
Registered User
 
N'awlins77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Lee
Posts: 1,622
 
Default

WD-40 or equivalent, hasn't failed me yet!
N'awlins77 is offline  
post #10 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-15-2011, 03:33 PM
Registered User
 
Phil P's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: Phil
Posts: 2,117
 
Default

Cellulose thinners? Mineral spirits (white spirits?)? Really good for the environment, those are! Not to mention highly flamable.

Regards

Phil
Phil P is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Getting started with router bits Mike Router Bits - Types and Usage 26 02-22-2015 02:23 PM
A suggestion from Maurice harrysin Woodturning and Lathes 48 12-08-2013 09:16 AM
New router and which starter router bits for my useage? Skyglider Router Bits - Types and Usage 11 12-08-2010 09:42 PM
Old Glossary Terms Mark Site Help and Suggestions 0 10-14-2008 01:30 AM
Best way to clean shipping 'grease' off new router bits? Gator95 General Routing 4 03-01-2008 07:59 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome