Patching a chip - Router Forums
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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 06:28 AM Thread Starter
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Default Patching a chip

Hi

As part of my drive to finally finish the new dining table, I've got a repair to do - as a result of a small "accident". A triangular chip needs to be repaired, and I don't have the chip to glue back in. I'm wondering what the best approach is - it doesn't have to be router based, however am assuming that this will generate the best result.

I understand that an 'inlay kit' could be used here : using a jig, to cut a female recess slightly bigger than the chip - and then again using the jig, to cut an identical sized male plug to go into the recess. Is that feasible?

Or are there other methods that I should consider? The complication is that the chip is varies in depth and width. For your info, the table top is 42mm thick. The chip is about 13mm wide (at its widest) and about 10mm deep (at it's deepest). As it heads inboard, it shallows and narrows.

Matthew
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 08:56 AM
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It all depends on how visible this will be on the finished product and what type of finish you will put on the table.
The cleanest fix is to cut the table top removing the chipped section and glue it back together but you end up with a table that much narrower than you planned.
Or cut out the whole piece along the glue lines and glue in a new one slightly thicker so that you can plane it down flat in case there is any movement during glue up.

An in place fix would work best if you standardized the dimensions of the hole so that you can make a piece to fit in it's place. You could route it down to the lowest point and along it's length but then you would want to square the back with a chisel or mortiser. The change in lines may be apparent through the finish but probably better than most any other type of patch and you can work hard to match the grain.
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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 09:50 AM
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Is that the end of the table top? Are you planning to use breadboard edges? This area will be cut away to make the tongue for a breadboard edge - problem solved. If you weren't going to use them maybe you should now.

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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 11:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_nite_owl View Post
It all depends on how visible this will be on the finished product and what type of finish you will put on the table.
The cleanest fix is to cut the table top removing the chipped section and glue it back together but you end up with a table that much narrower than you planned.
Or cut out the whole piece along the glue lines and glue in a new one slightly thicker so that you can plane it down flat in case there is any movement during glue up.

An in place fix would work best if you standardized the dimensions of the hole so that you can make a piece to fit in it's place. You could route it down to the lowest point and along it's length but then you would want to square the back with a chisel or mortiser. The change in lines may be apparent through the finish but probably better than most any other type of patch and you can work hard to match the grain.
I was going to suggest something similar to your second fix. Cut out a rectangle in the table where the chip was, and create a piece of wood to fill in the spot.
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 02:36 PM
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Does the other side look good enough to be the top ?
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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 04:38 PM
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How long is the chip , if not too long how about a contrasting timber inlay band right around the edge of the table

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Harold

Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning.

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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 05:57 PM Thread Starter
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The table is already on the narrow side, so I don't want to reduce it further by ripping it and regaling. In addition, there's a similar shaped chip on the underside at the other end - although it's slightly bigger. So I need to deal with these chips by patching, rather than removing.

I did retain the exact same wood (that was cut of the end when squaring up) so matching grain/colour is no problem - it's just a matter if getting the patch to fit so well that it's barely noticeable.

I wasn't planning on using 'breadboard' ends on the table - otherwise that would have been a great solution. I guess I could do that, however I'm concerned it'll break the flowing look of the table, by placing a defined end on each end. That's the same reason that I'm not keen on some kind of inlay band around the edges.

I can't flip it over, as there are various "issues" on the underside that can't be exposed...

Last edited by matt1710; 09-07-2011 at 06:42 PM.
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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 10:52 PM
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It is difficult to patch and match the existing grain. Any patch will likely stick out like a sore thumb. You pretty much have to solve this from the point of view of what you can't do. What's left are your options. One is to plane the thickness down to get below the chip. I did something similar to a laminated woodworking bench by erecting a frame on each side and building a sled to ride on the frame that I could put my router on and use it to run back and forth across the top to level with. One other option is to inlay over the problem. Like the four major points of a compass?

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 11:13 PM
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If you have similar wood left over, try a few fix-it attempts on those left over pieces.
Sort of a rehearsal.

And yes, there is always the inlay idea already posted.
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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-07-2011, 11:31 PM Thread Starter
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I can't plane it down any more as it's now glued into a full width (1000mm) tabletop and that's way to wide to go through any of the thickness planers I have access to. I guess I could plane it with the router on a sled - however it's 2200mm long - that's a big hunk of wood to plan with a 1/2" bit!! I'd never get it super flat either, I doubt. Also, I'd need to take 10mm or so off it - meaning it'd end up only 30mm thick, and would start to look out of proportion with the under frame.

I will do some practice on the scrap bits, you can rest assured there!
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