Burnt End Mill - Router Forums
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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-03-2014, 02:47 PM Thread Starter
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Default Burnt End Mill

Here's an easy question. While attempting to learn how to make mortises using my plunge router I burnt the end mill bit. It was my fault as it started smoking and I just pressed on until I reach the end of the cut. Is the bit worthless now or can I somehow salvage it?

Thanks,

Jim M.
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-03-2014, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Seldonman View Post
Here's an easy question. While attempting to learn how to make mortises using my plunge router I burnt the end mill bit. It was my fault as it started smoking and I just pressed on until I reach the end of the cut. Is the bit worthless now or can I somehow salvage it?

Thanks,

Jim M.
Toast...
sounds like you were trying to cut/remove too much material in one pass...
what style of end mill are you using???

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-03-2014, 05:31 PM Thread Starter
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Toast...
sounds like you were trying to cut/remove too much material in one pass...
what style of end mill are you using???
Ok, here is a picture of two types of end mill bits that I have. As you can see the burnt one is on the right. I know I want to use a bit that pulls the material up and out or in another words, an up spiral but I do not know if either of these is the correct end mill for mortising.

Any ideas?

Jim
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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-03-2014, 05:59 PM
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Ok, here is a picture of two types of end mill bits that I have. As you can see the burnt one is on the right. I know I want to use a bit that pulls the material up and out or in another words, an up spiral but I do not know if either of these is the correct end mill for mortising.

Any ideas?

Jim
I use end mills all the time...
and do you think I could find a specific link to what I use...
spirals are fine for mortises...
it appears that cutters are on the end of the mill and they lack cutting capabilities on the spiral...
look at this one and you'll see what mean...

Freud Tools | 1/2" (Dia.) Up Spiral Bit

are those tool steel or solid carbide???
where were they made???
what speed are you turning???
how much material are you trying to cut in one pass...

have a study..

Freud Tools

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-03-2014, 06:35 PM Thread Starter
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Here is what I know. The bit is marked HS so I assume High Speed Steel. Do not know brand as they were given to me as a gift. The router is a Bosch 1611 EVS set to highest speed setting of "5". Routing White Oak and using depth setting set about 1/4 inch per step. I plunger down and then forward but may be moving to quickly. I did not remove waste material between cuts but will do so in the future.
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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-03-2014, 07:22 PM
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Here is what I know. The bit is marked HS so I assume High Speed Steel. Do not know brand as they were given to me as a gift. The router is a Bosch 1611 EVS set to highest speed setting of "5". Routing White Oak and using depth setting set about 1/4 inch per step. I plunger down and then forward but may be moving to quickly. I did not remove waste material between cuts but will do so in the future.
agreed.. Steel..
25,000 RPM is a little quick for steel.. dial back to 3 or 4 and slow the feed rate...
use carbide on Oak... steel is pretty much defeated before you even start..
look to that Freud link for some product...
CMT is good if you can source them...
Whiteside is a very good bang for the buck...
Whiteside Machine Company
people swear by them but bits from china are not worth the money at any price IMO...

What I use the most of in a production shop... they come from Travers...
SuperCEED® Solid Carbide Hi-Feed X-MAX® Force Coated Multiple Flute Roughing End Mills | Travers Tool

good man to talk to...
Clayton Lewis
P:800-234-9985 x 2595
F: 800-838-8308

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-03-2014, 07:29 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Stick for the good information. I will follow it and let you know what happens. I did think that the faster you cut the cleaner it would be but looks like I am mistaken. Is there a rule of thumb for router speed? I know if I am using a big bit I want to go slow but that is all I know at this time.

Jim
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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-03-2014, 07:31 PM
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Jim...
Mill ends work better if you multi-pass for width...
say you are mortising for 3/4". use a 1/2" mill...
1/2' mortise use a 5/16 mill...
you get the idea
you can collet that 1617 of yours for 1/4, 5/16, 3/8 and 1/2 inch mills...
start out turning the mill on slow speed and work your way up... you'll sense what works...

another thing...
there are tons of mortising guides/jig posted in this forum...
use the search function and look for "mortising jig"...
or maybe somebuddy here has the best links already ready to go...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”

Last edited by Stick486; 08-03-2014 at 07:35 PM.
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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-03-2014, 07:42 PM
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"bit that pulls the material up and out or in another words, an up spiral but I do not know if either of these is the correct end mill for mortising.

Any ideas?
Jim
****************************************
Cutters are bottom cutters but sick and old. If these cutters will not allow a 1/16/pass without burning they are shot. 1/4 pass, even with your big router, is too much waste/pass.
Router bits are better at cutting wood than mill cutters. Switch whilst you're ahead.
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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-03-2014, 08:42 PM Thread Starter
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Default Tage Frid Jig

I found this jig in the Highland woodworker site and it was supposedly used by Tage Frid when he needed to rout a mortise. I am surprised that you said that end mills are not the optimal bit for routing mortise. Are you saying that a straight bit is better?
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