after routing - the "fuzzies"! - Router Forums
 
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-16-2014, 02:30 PM Thread Starter
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Default after routing - the "fuzzies"!

Practicing printing my name with the router.
The dig is fuzzy on one side, clean on the other.
Is there a way of correcting this, or cleaning it
out manually?
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-16-2014, 06:34 PM
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Fuzzies can be caused by dull bits, dirty bits, poor quality bits, and when going cross grain.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-16-2014, 07:50 PM
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Hey Bob, that's better free-hand than i think i could do. I see the fuzzies are all on one side of the cut, but not on the other. It also appears that your bit diameter is the same as your letter width. My conclusion from that is that one side of the cut is going the right direction (bit rotation cutting into the wood as you move the router), while the other side of the cut ends up being a climb cut (bit's cutting edge pushing away from the cut).

If that is the correct assumption, the solutions may include:
Use a smaller bit, and make the cut on the outside in one direction, then make the inside cut going the other direction so that your bit's cutting edge is always turning into the cut.
or
Use a small diameter bit to outline the letters (clockwise on the inside, counter clockwise on the outside), then use a wider straight bit to clean out the center.

Hope that makes sense. This article may be clearer: With a Router, You Need Direction

earl
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-17-2014, 12:59 PM
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I've never seen tear out like this . Makes me wonder if the bits to dull, or the woods wet possibly?

I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-17-2014, 01:53 PM
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I agree with Earl's assessment. Could also be a dull bit. You can fix this, depending on the thickness of the displaced fibers, by running some fine sand paper along the fuzzy edge.

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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-18-2014, 09:59 AM
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we sometimes get this type of fuzzys on the CNC depending on the type of wood used. I use the drimmel with a sanding mop to clean them up, it is easier then hand sanding. Hope this helps
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-18-2014, 12:44 PM
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I agree with greenacres2. Change in direction to the grain.

If you would like to alleviate this problem, use a down cut spiral bit for this kind of work if you can. Leaves a clean edge on the top and leaves a very flat bottom. Only disadvantage is that it leaves the shaving in the groove without good dust collection. That is the trade off.

Just a suggestion. Always be aware which direction you are routing in and plan your cuts accordingly.


Just remember what my father always said, " Half the people in this world are below average!", and everything in life will make a hellova lot more sense.

Last edited by timbertailor; 09-18-2014 at 12:47 PM.
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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-18-2014, 08:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timbertailor View Post
I agree with greenacres2. Change in direction to the grain.

If you would like to alleviate this problem, use a down cut spiral bit for this kind of work if you can. Leaves a clean edge on the top and leaves a very flat bottom. Only disadvantage is that it leaves the shaving in the groove without good dust collection. That is the trade off.

Just a suggestion. Always be aware which direction you are routing in and plan your cuts accordingly.
That's much better than my solutions Brad. I guess if i owned any spiral bits (up, down or compression), i might have had a different solution. Assuming i remembered i had those bits!!

Who was it that said "if the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail"? Somebody on here has that as a sig line!!

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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-18-2014, 09:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenacres2 View Post
That's much better than my solutions Brad. I guess if i owned any spiral bits (up, down or compression), i might have had a different solution. Assuming i remembered i had those bits!!

earl
It is hard for me to remember what bits I have, as well. I do know they are all sharp because I rarely use the same one twice. It seems I am buying a new one(s) every time I start a project.


Just remember what my father always said, " Half the people in this world are below average!", and everything in life will make a hellova lot more sense.
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-23-2014, 10:31 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you all for you replies. I will try your suggestions.
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