Routing large lap joints - lots of them... - Router Forums
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post #1 of 31 (permalink) Old 07-26-2015, 05:58 PM Thread Starter
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Default Routing large lap joints - lots of them...

I am planning a new garden shed.

Part of my design involves quite a lot of cross and end lap joints.

Now I know a lot of people recommend just butt-jointing but it's my project and I'm being stubborn on this one

If it were just a few joints I would do them buy hand - but having totalled up the timbers and intersections I am looking at about 100 joints

To make matters worse, they are big joints - 63mm square and 19mm deep for most of them.

My plan is to clamp multiple timbers together and run the router across them, but with such a large amount of timber to remove and only a cheap router at my disposal, I'm worried it will be too much for it.

I had a thought - If I set my circular saw to a little less than the final depth and make several cuts with it, much like I would when making the kerf's by hand, and then use the router to remove the remainder and set the final depth.

Is this a good strategy do you think?
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post #2 of 31 (permalink) Old 07-26-2015, 06:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Carrot View Post
I am planning a new garden shed.

Part of my design involves quite a lot of cross and end lap joints.

Now I know a lot of people recommend just butt-jointing but it's my project and I'm being stubborn on this one

If it were just a few joints I would do them buy hand - but having totalled up the timbers and intersections I am looking at about 100 joints

To make matters worse, they are big joints - 63mm square and 19mm deep for most of them.

My plan is to clamp multiple timbers together and run the router across them, but with such a large amount of timber to remove and only a cheap router at my disposal, I'm worried it will be too much for it.

I had a thought - If I set my circular saw to a little less than the final depth and make several cuts with it, much like I would when making the kerf's by hand, and then use the router to remove the remainder and set the final depth.

Is this a good strategy do you think?
have a look see here...
Oliver aka Gaffboat has your method, jig and answer...

http://www.routerforums.com/general-...long-area.html
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Last edited by Stick486; 07-26-2015 at 06:14 PM.
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post #3 of 31 (permalink) Old 07-26-2015, 06:34 PM Thread Starter
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have a look see here...
Oliver aka Gaffboat has your method, jig and answer...

[can't post the url ]
Excellent - so I wasn't being daft then - that was practically what I was thinking of doing, but those sketchups sure helped visualise it.
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post #4 of 31 (permalink) Old 07-26-2015, 06:44 PM
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It's always a good idea to remove as much of the waste with a more efficient tool no matter what the routing operation. If it's a hole or mortice then drill the waste, skil saw in this case where you have a lap, following a pattern then bandsaw or jigsaw, etc. Routers are a finishing tool. They aren't good at removing a lot of wood.
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post #5 of 31 (permalink) Old 07-26-2015, 06:46 PM
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Routers are a finishing tool. They aren't good at removing a lot of wood.
That's actually a quite helpful comment for us beginners. Thanks.
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post #6 of 31 (permalink) Old 07-26-2015, 06:51 PM
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Excellent - so I wasn't being daft then - that was practically what I was thinking of doing, but those sketchups sure helped visualize it.
daft is a good thing...
we understand and communicate well in daft here...
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This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #7 of 31 (permalink) Old 07-26-2015, 06:59 PM
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daft is a good thing...
we understand and communicate well in daft here...
Being multi-lingual certainly has its advantages

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post #8 of 31 (permalink) Old 07-26-2015, 07:02 PM
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Being mufti-lingual certainly has its advantages
being well versed in typonese is a major plus...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #9 of 31 (permalink) Old 07-26-2015, 07:24 PM Thread Starter
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I'm multi lingual


I can do British, American and Australian...

As well as endless gibberish!
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post #10 of 31 (permalink) Old 07-26-2015, 07:28 PM
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Jon, doing multiple timbers at the same time is for sure the way to go!
Gang cutting on jobsites is standard practice, especially for something like you're doing.
I often have to do that on 4 x 4/6x6 posts, where they'll be supporting beams or box joists. Just makes sense; huge time saver, and way easier on your tools.

Here's a discussion on the concept...
contractortalk.com/f14/cutting-rafters-88708/
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