Routing Oak rebate for double glazing - Router Forums
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-04-2015, 01:39 AM Thread Starter
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Default Routing Oak rebate for double glazing

Hi Guys

Hope everyone is well.

Iv recently bought a house with Chunky Oak framing. It is needing to be glazed up.

I would like to route a 15mm by 50mm rebate to take double glazed panels. Is this going to be too difficult with the wood being so hard?

Other option is to bead around the glass panels. but i dont think this will look as nice and I will have to buy additional Oak for this.

Hope that makes sense

Any thoughts/ suggestions would be greatly appreciated?

Thanks

Alan
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-04-2015, 02:13 AM
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?...has the house been gutted?
I'm kind of at a loss here, N/A. Are you taking all the openings back to the rough framing, or are we actually looking at the window frames less glazing? Were Oak window sashes removed from some windows?
Could you please supply more info and window detail (pictures?)...a first name would be nice too.
What's the climate like where this house is located?
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-04-2015, 02:35 AM
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you would be better off ordering windows to fit the framed opening....
simply rebating for panels skips quite a few features incorporated into windows to handle snow/ice/rain...
you also have to allow for wood movement... and a slew of other things...
building insets would be another option...

if you follow these PDF's and make your own windows you will see it gets quite involved...

there is a thread here where a member built his own windows...
a lot of in-depth information is there...

sorry .. couldn't find it....
maybe another member will have better luck...
Attached Files
File Type: pdf WINDOW NOMENCLATURE.pdf (224.6 KB, 68 views)
File Type: pdf How To Install Doors And Windows.pdf (22.4 KB, 56 views)
File Type: pdf WindowSashandRailSystem.pdf (1.88 MB, 70 views)

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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-04-2015, 03:03 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the feedback. I did put my first name. Alan. Its was at end of message.

Its in england so weahter gets wet and coldish. No its a new build that was never finished. Oak timber framing at the rear that I want large glass panels putting in.

I wasn't wanting the cost or visual impact of buying and fitting oak window frames into the oak framing. My second option was putting insets in as you sugested. But again cost of extra oak and a slight visual imppact puts me off.

Thats why I was hoping to simply make the Oak frame itself into the window framing.

Thanks

Alan
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-04-2015, 03:25 AM
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glazing straight to the timber framing may not be such a good plan....
not engineering or building for water/weather control aren't good ones either...
stress on the glass panels from wood movement just may break the glass...
not being able to properly seal the panels will run up your energy costs..
invite water intrusion which leads to water damage and if the wood can't dry you are looking at rot taking hold...
all in all, not doing things correctly from the start will do nothing but cost more and more in the long run...
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-04-2015, 03:49 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks I'll have to look into it a little closer.

I fully understand about movement. But I thought putting in a casement would still suffer the same movement. Just leaving a 5mm gap around edge would cut down on the risk of cracking glass.

Thanks for the feedback though. greatly appreciated.

Alan
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-04-2015, 04:03 AM
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Alan...
do you need to use oak???
you could build w/ a more economical wood and veneer that in oak...
have another PDF or three....
Attached Files
File Type: pdf WOOD FOR OUTDOORS – APPLICATIONS.pdf (73.4 KB, 41 views)
File Type: pdf Wood Look-Alikes.pdf (115.8 KB, 51 views)
File Type: pdf WOOD SUBSTITUTES.pdf (762.4 KB, 144 views)

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-04-2015, 09:32 AM
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Having been an architect with a branch office in Croyden for a number of years I'm quite familiar with your climate. I really don't recommend what you are planning. Yes I've seen it done but in the long run there are always problems. People think that they can do this and seal around the window with a 50 year silicone and that's all there is to it. Not true ! The silicone will break down from UV exposure and will allow moisture to get in around the glass. Without sloping the bottom member ( sill ) you'll have standing water there. You could avoid this with a flashing or sloping that member but it will be a lot of work. From a practical standpoint there are some problems. You will have to make some sort of a router guide so that the router doesn't follow the irregular shape of the oak member. The glass will have to sit in a rabbit with trim on the inside to hold it in place or there won't be a way to fit the glass in. In the picture it shows the drywall flush with the oak member on the sides so rabbiting those areas presents a problem.

I would suggest that to get as close to the look you are wanting that you slope the bottom member and use a low profile window frame manufactured by a window manufacturer that has the proper flashing and thermal breaks.

Last, I really like the project. It will require a lot of work to finish it properly but will in the end be well worth it. Where in the UK is it located ?

Buck
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-04-2015, 11:29 AM
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I have to agree with the rest. You may get the look you are hoping for at the beginning but you won't like the look later when your frames rot from water infiltration and possibly condensation on the panes.

Alan when you get a chance why not change your profile to include your name and proper location?

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-04-2015, 12:01 PM
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Thanks for all the new info, Alan. I agree with pretty much all the comments above.
I live on the West Coast of Canada and I believe our climates are fairly similar, ie wet!
Water ingression is a huge issue here, as is rot.
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