Great Router Video from Norm - Router Forums
 12Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 12-04-2015, 08:51 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 258
 
Default Great Router Video from Norm

Having taken a break from trying to learn woodworking, I'm hoping to learn some new skills over the holidays, weather permitting. My interest in woodworking was inspired by Norm. This video is one of the best introductions to routers I've seen, so I highly recommend it to other beginners. What frustrates me about it, though, is the dado jig. He cuts the dado, and the shelf fits perfectly. In my limited experience, it's next to impossible to get a bit to fit the thickness of a shelf perfectly. I can only assume that he either milled the shelf to match the bit, or he got lucky. My guess is that for most people using this jig, it would be better to use a 1/2" bit and to cut the dado in two operations, shifting the jig from one side of the 3/4" dado to the other. Your comments and suggestions are welcome.


Scotty: I can't change the law of physics! I've got to have 30 minutes!
patlaw is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 12-04-2015, 10:01 AM
Retired Moderator
 
Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 11,921
 
Send a message via Skype™ to Mike
Default

Mike, plywood bits are sized to work with the 1/32" reduced sizes. Solid wood is still on 1/4" sizes.
Moz likes this.

Mike
"Living in the D" (this means Detroit!)
"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"
Mike is offline  
post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 12-04-2015, 10:22 AM
Registered User
 
CharleyL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Charley
Posts: 2,137
 
Default

Mike,

Make yourself one of these jigs and your router dados will be the perfect width every time.

Charley

Exact-Width Dado Jig
kp91, Stick486, Semipro and 1 others like this.

Central North Carolina
CharleyL is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 12-04-2015, 11:25 AM
Registered User
 
gjackson52's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Country: United States
First Name: Gary
Posts: 652
 
Default

Also remember that what we saw on the video is not necessarily all that happened. If I remember right, Norm did say that the show was edited for time, and that you didn't always see everything that went into making his projects. Even with that said, I agree...Norm was great to watch.


Gary
gjackson52 is offline  
post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 12-04-2015, 07:36 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 29,176
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CharleyL View Post
Mike,

Make yourself one of these jigs and your router dados will be the perfect width every time.

Charley

Exact-Width Dado Jig
excellent...
use a top bearing mortising bit and take the KISS/MISS route..
better quality bits for less money...

.
Freud Tools | 1/2" (Dia.) Mortising Bit

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is offline  
post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 12-04-2015, 07:48 PM
Retired Moderator
 
TwoSkies57's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Bill
Posts: 6,028
   
Default

Never assume anything..


nominal Thickness Actual Thickness
1/4” 1/4”
3/8” 11/32”
1/2” 15/32”
5/8” 19/32”
3/4” 23/32”
1-1/8” 1-1/8”

Thickness in Millimeters

Thickness (inch) Thickness (milimeter)
1/8” 3.2mm
1/4” 6.4mm
5/16” 8mm
3/8” 9.5mm
7/16” 11.1mm
1/2” 12.7mm
5/8” 15.9mm
3/4” 19mm
1-1/8” 28.6mm
1-1/4” 31.75mm

Baltic Birch produced to metric equivalents.

Source: Plywood Thickness | ThePlywood.com

comment from Norm A. himself on plywood:
Norm Abram replies: I come up against this problem all the time, and there's no simple answer. For starters, plywood is not like lumber; it's made to the thickness actually stamped on its face. The problem is, the manufacturing tolerances vary depending on the kind of plywood being made. For instance, sanded grades of softwood plywood that are ¾ inch thick or less — the type you'd probably use for utility shelves — are manufactured to tolerances of plus/minus 0.4 mm (1/64 inch). Most other softwood plywood, including the unsanded grades, is manufactured to a tolerance of plus/minus 0.8 mm (1/32 inch).

Hardwood plywood, which is used to build higher-quality cabinets and shelves, is a slightly different story. Panels ¼ inch thick or more are made to a tolerance of plus 0.0 mm/minus 1.2 mm (3/64 inch). A plus-zero tolerance is dictated by the cabinet and furniture manufacturers, the biggest users of this material, who can live with a panel that's slightly too thin but not one that's too thick, because of the assembly problems it causes.

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/askt...459293,00.html
ksidwy and PhilBa like this.

"..... limited only by imagination"

"Just smile and wave boys, smile and wave"
Skipper the Penguin

Last edited by TwoSkies57; 12-04-2015 at 07:55 PM.
TwoSkies57 is offline  
post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 12-05-2015, 08:49 AM
Registered User
 
PhilBa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Country: United States
First Name: phil
Posts: 1,533
 
Default

I'll toss in that dimensional lumber often isn't of a consistent thickness, either. I've gotten boards that are sold as 3/4" thick but are often 1/64" to 1/32" less. Your best bet is an exact width dado jig so you make a dado based on the actual thickness of the board you are going to use. This is sometimes hard when you are making a dado for the bottom of a drawer or such but for shelves and carcases it makes a lot of sense. You certainly can tune a dado blade to the correct thickness but for the router approach you are stuck with the existing bit widths.

By the way, router bits aren't all that consistent either. When you combine bit runout and collet runout you can get a wider slot. Usually not terrible but it can lead to a looser fit than you would think. It happened to me with a freud bit and PC collet (not talking about low end stuff here). I got loose box joints. A quarter turn of the bit in the collet and I got tight ones. The difference was a little less than 1/64".

Measure twice, cut once and CROSS OUT THE WRONG MARKS.

Visit my shop website.
PhilBa is offline  
post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 12-05-2015, 08:59 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 258
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBa View Post
I'll toss in that dimensional lumber often isn't of a consistent thickness, either. I've gotten boards that are sold as 3/4" thick but are often 1/64" to 1/32" less. Your best bet is an exact width dado jig so you make a dado based on the actual thickness of the board you are going to use. This is sometimes hard when you are making a dado for the bottom of a drawer or such but for shelves and carcases it makes a lot of sense. You certainly can tune a dado blade to the correct thickness but for the router approach you are stuck with the existing bit widths.

By the way, router bits aren't all that consistent either. When you combine bit runout and collet runout you can get a wider slot. Usually not terrible but it can lead to a looser fit than you would think. It happened to me with a freud bit and PC collet (not talking about low end stuff here). I got loose box joints. A quarter turn of the bit in the collet and I got tight ones. The difference was a little less than 1/64".
And there you go. I get my confidence up, and then I realize that I'm probably just getting ready to make another mess.

Scotty: I can't change the law of physics! I've got to have 30 minutes!
patlaw is offline  
post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 12-05-2015, 01:10 PM
Marine Engineer
 
kp91's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Country: United States
First Name: Doug
Posts: 4,684
 
Default

Exact width jig using template guides. Works like a charm
jw2170, Nickp and ksidwy like this.

Doug
1 John 1:9
Fredericksburg, VA




http://disasterreliefeffort.org/
kp91 is online now  
post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-03-2016, 10:58 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: Ken
Posts: 4
 
Default

Hi there. I have only just taken up the hobby and have just bought a router and table.
The first project that was undertaken was a dado jig that didn't need a bush. The only real stipulation is that you use the same bit with the jig every time.
I used wing nuts instead of the ones that need a spanner to make it easier.
I hope I have been able to help as this is my first post apart from my introduction.
Oh dear I have just realised that I cannot use URL's yet but the guide I followed can be found by googling ukworkshop videos Adjustable dado / housing joint jig.
Hope I havn't broken any rules by doing that.


Ken

Last edited by Semipro; 01-03-2016 at 02:57 PM. Reason: added link
taralabradog is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Router Backup yuva New Member Introductions 6 01-21-2014 08:33 PM
Grizzly G1035 Shaper vs Router Table GAVolunteer Table-mounted Routing 11 06-30-2010 06:35 AM
A great inlay video Bob N Guide Bushings and Templates 2 12-24-2009 01:50 PM
New here burlboy New Member Introductions 9 01-15-2009 11:53 AM
Old Glossary Terms Mark Site Help and Suggestions 0 10-14-2008 01:30 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome