Metric conversion? Oh No! - Router Forums
 85Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 78 (permalink) Old 03-11-2016, 11:39 PM Thread Starter
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 18,120
 
Talking Metric conversion? Oh No!

Every time I try to work with metric, I find myself stuck at some point. Well, having grown up with the imperial system, it always surprises me how difficult the Metric system seems to be to use her in the U.S.A. Now, I've stumbled upon and article that pinpoints why it is such a hassle to me, to use metric. Read on and comment if you will. (From Wikipedia)


One common complaint about the metric system is that it doesn't provide a natural way to divide things into thirds; even dividing things into quarters requires one to go down two levels, instead of just one, in the system of units, since 0.25 is the decimal that represents 1/4.

The metric system did not divide the day into 100,000 parts; instead, the hour, minute, and second were retained to allow the day to be divided neatly into quarters and thirds.

In response to an instance of the occasionally-heard suggestion that the metric system should have been built on base 12 instead of base 10, it occurred to me that the precedent of an everyday unit, the day, standing in such a relationship to the metric unit, the second, that the day can be exactly divided into 27 parts, each of which consists of an even number of seconds (3200 seconds, or 53 minutes and 20 seconds), one could, for example, use as everyday units a metric pound of 453.6 grams (instead of approximately 453.69 grams) and a metric inch of 2.52 centimeters (instead of 2.54 centimeters).

453.6 grams divides evenly into 81 units of 5.6 grams, and also into 7 units of 64.8 grams - and, for that matter, into 8 units of 56.7 grams. 2.52 centimeters divides evenly into 9 units of 0.28 centimeters, and also into 7 units of 0.36 centimeters - and, for that matter, into 4 units of 0.63 centimeters.

However, I can't really expect that this very wild idea of using this metric pound and metric inch as everyday units, and measuring things out in these pounds and inches, so that they can be evenly divided into thirds, ninths, and sevenths if one uses the regular metric scale, would catch on.


Back to me... There, now I understand why thinking Imperial clashes with measuring metric.

Water and oil. Matches and gasoline.
DesertRatTom is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 78 (permalink) Old 03-12-2016, 12:16 AM
Registered User
 
sunnybob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Country: Cyprus
First Name: Bob
Posts: 1,882
 
Default

That whole article is based on wrong info. check out the link below.

having spent the first 30 years of my life with imperial, and then another 30 in a country that had both (you could buy a half inch garden hose but it had to be 20 metres long, if you wanted a kilo bag of sugar you drove a mile to buy it, etc. etc.) and finally 8 years now in a solely metric country, I can tell you why you have trouble with metric.

Its not your first language. Just like being bi lingual, you can be fluent in languages, but you will always think in your first one.

I am comfortable now with metric, I dont even have an imperial measure any more, but if I need to describe something to someone, my brain will always come up with 2 foot long, never 60cm or 600mm. Those number require thought.

Why is a minute divided into 60 seconds, an hour into 60 minutes, yet there are only 24 hours in a day? - Scientific American
kp91 and Herb Stoops like this.
sunnybob is online now  
post #3 of 78 (permalink) Old 03-12-2016, 12:23 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Country: Canada
First Name: Keith
Posts: 1,151
 
Default

Why should we always have to think in 1/4's, 8ths, 16ths, 32nds, 64ths, 128ths, 256ths. 512ths etc. What's wrong with 10ths?

You and I have been raised imperially, not metrically. But the metric system is extremely easy once you use it for awhile.

What you have to do is to forget imperial when you are working with metric. It's really quite straight forward.

One day, the U.S will go the way of the rest of the world...metric.
Cherryville Chuck likes this.

OK, fess up...which one of you clowns stole my sig? It was right here a second ago.
cocobolo1 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 78 (permalink) Old 03-12-2016, 12:33 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 29,256
 
Default

plans call for Imperial use Imperial measuring devices...
do it the same way for metric and don't about conversions...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is online now  
post #5 of 78 (permalink) Old 03-12-2016, 12:35 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Country: Canada
First Name: Keith
Posts: 1,151
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by stick486 View Post
plans call for imperial use imperial measuring devices...
Do it the same way for metric and don't about conversions...
prezackly!
Shop guy and jj777746 like this.

OK, fess up...which one of you clowns stole my sig? It was right here a second ago.
cocobolo1 is offline  
post #6 of 78 (permalink) Old 03-12-2016, 06:48 AM
Registered User
 
vindaloo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: Angie
Posts: 1,651
 
Default

Glad Stick said that. I use both and I was bought up mainly with metric. My dad used imperial, he was an apprentice engineer draughtsman in the late 50's, early 60's and use imperial then and in his woodworking. So I saw that side and then at school metric had just come in so I learned that. Now I use whatever is suitable for the situation.

I get the problem dividing 10 by 3 in engineering, but in carpentry is there really a problem? After all a third of a mm is a sneeze out.

When everything around you is going to pot, get out in the workshop.
vindaloo is offline  
post #7 of 78 (permalink) Old 03-12-2016, 08:13 AM
Registered User
 
Hutzul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: N/a
Posts: 67
 
Default

I trained as a mechanical engineer in the early 1970's, where at college we were told to forget imperial and we were taught in metric. However back at work as a toolmaker we worked in imperial, so like vindaloo ' Now I use whatever is suitable for the situation'.
I prefer to use metric, especially when the calculator is in play.
Shop guy and cocobolo1 like this.
Hutzul is offline  
post #8 of 78 (permalink) Old 03-12-2016, 09:06 AM
Registered User
 
neville9999's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Country: Australia
First Name: Neville
Posts: 1,868
 
Send a message via Yahoo to neville9999
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertRatTom View Post
Every time I try to work with metric, I find myself stuck at some point. Well, having grown up with the imperial system, it always surprises me how difficult the Metric system seems to be to use her in the U.S.A. Now, I've stumbled upon and article that pinpoints why it is such a hassle to me, to use metric. Read on and comment if you will. (From Wikipedia)


One common complaint about the metric system is that it doesn't provide a natural way to divide things into thirds; even dividing things into quarters requires one to go down two levels, instead of just one, in the system of units, since 0.25 is the decimal that represents 1/4.

The metric system did not divide the day into 100,000 parts; instead, the hour, minute, and second were retained to allow the day to be divided neatly into quarters and thirds.

In response to an instance of the occasionally-heard suggestion that the metric system should have been built on base 12 instead of base 10, it occurred to me that the precedent of an everyday unit, the day, standing in such a relationship to the metric unit, the second, that the day can be exactly divided into 27 parts, each of which consists of an even number of seconds (3200 seconds, or 53 minutes and 20 seconds), one could, for example, use as everyday units a metric pound of 453.6 grams (instead of approximately 453.69 grams) and a metric inch of 2.52 centimeters (instead of 2.54 centimeters).

453.6 grams divides evenly into 81 units of 5.6 grams, and also into 7 units of 64.8 grams - and, for that matter, into 8 units of 56.7 grams. 2.52 centimeters divides evenly into 9 units of 0.28 centimeters, and also into 7 units of 0.36 centimeters - and, for that matter, into 4 units of 0.63 centimeters.

However, I can't really expect that this very wild idea of using this metric pound and metric inch as everyday units, and measuring things out in these pounds and inches, so that they can be evenly divided into thirds, ninths, and sevenths if one uses the regular metric scale, would catch on.


Back to me... There, now I understand why thinking Imperial clashes with measuring metric.

Water and oil. Matches and gasoline.
You are overly complicating it as Metric is as easy as it gets so just forget all that can't divide pounds with rubles. Oh and when you get a minute can you tell me what a 1/3 of 11/64ths is? N
jj777746 likes this.
neville9999 is offline  
post #9 of 78 (permalink) Old 03-12-2016, 09:11 AM
Contributor of the Month
 
OPG3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Otis
Posts: 1,985
 
Default

Metric is base ten because men (and women) have 10 fingers - it is as simple as that.
I use both systems and quickly recognize the comparative stupidity of the imperial system.
An inch is 1/12th of a foot and neither one of those has anything whatsoever to do with a pound or an ounce.
And still neither of those has anything whatsoever to do with quarts or gallons. Imperial is a goofy system and after a long career in engineering, I can honestly say that one spends quite a bit of time making volumetric and weight calculations.

The basic metric unit of measure is the meter. 1/100 is a centimeter and 1/1000 of the meter is a millimeter.
Using water (the standard in chemistry & physics), one cubic centimeter weighs one gram. Just as simple as that proves the stupidity of imperial units of measure. Therefore, one liter of water, weighs one kilogram.

Now, try that with inches and feet vs. pounds or ounces vs. quarts and gallons and those of you who are metric naysayers have just proven that you have a deep lack of understanding of this inherent simplicity.

My products are sold globally and fortunately most of the planet uses metric. Rather than sit-around and gripe about it, I chose to embrace the system and see it for what it really is...SMART!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia

OPG3

Tweak everything!
OPG3 is offline  
post #10 of 78 (permalink) Old 03-12-2016, 09:17 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Gaffboat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Oliver
Posts: 2,139
 
Default

Although I do most everything with imperial measurements, I often resort to metric for my projects when I need precision that's easy to measure and to add and subtract.

Dragons slain. Damsels rescued. No reasonable request refused ... unless the dragon's really big.

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. ~ Leonardo da Vinci

You can't use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have. ~Oscar Wilde

http://profhenrys.blogspot.com
Gaffboat is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Metric Router Lift Availability plunger Table-mounted Routing 19 03-08-2014 09:17 PM
Availability of Metric Spiral Upcut Bits in the US? williaty Router Bits - Types and Usage 13 01-13-2014 07:27 AM
Metric bits and guide bushings Mike The Voting Booth 29 05-09-2012 09:08 AM
making and accurate template for an oval hand mirror bob oswin Jigs and Fixtures 31 01-20-2009 07:36 PM
Trying to go metric you have convinced me, help me get them dovetail_65 Guide Bushings and Templates 15 01-12-2009 02:44 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome