220V Foot switch - Router Forums
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post #1 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-07-2016, 05:09 PM Thread Starter
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Default 220V Foot switch

I was thinking to get a DC and realized I had a 110V foot switch, but some DCs can, and probably should, be run on 220V. In looking for switches, I saw most were only momentary. I like the ones that stay on, SPST or the like. I looked on grizzly and amazon, but most on amazon are for sewing machines it seems.

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post #2 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-07-2016, 05:11 PM
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use a 4 pole relay...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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post #3 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-07-2016, 05:14 PM Thread Starter
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Default Foot switch

Oh, and I mean at a reasonable price. I see some for $70-80, but that seems pretty expensive for a switch.

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post #4 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-07-2016, 06:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith C View Post
I was thinking to get a DC and realized I had a 110V foot switch, but some DCs can, and probably should, be run on 220V. In looking for switches, I saw most were only momentary. I like the ones that stay on, SPST or the like. I looked on grizzly and amazon, but most on amazon are for sewing machines it seems.
Keith my shop is small so I don't mind taking a step or two and turn it on. Every machine have is on wheels and I roll them to my DC when needed. Your situation may be different. Also 220 volt switches will cost more.

Don in Murfreesboro,Tn.

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post #5 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-08-2016, 12:35 AM
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On any 220v circuit you only have to switch one wire. Each hot lead wire acts as the neutral for the other so if you interrupt one then there is no circuit. Most of the cables for power tools only have the two hot leads and a bare ground. You only need the third conductor (neutral i.e.) if you need to also run some 120 volt functions like the clock and lights on an electric stove. I run my air compressor by switching just one wire through the pressure switch.

Just as an after thought, I also hooked up my 220v DC that way. I wanted to be able to turn it on from either end of my shop so I used a pair of 3 way light switches to turn it off and on, only switching one of the two hot leads.

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post #6 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-08-2016, 07:57 AM
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Just as an FYI, I believe the various electrical codes require that both legs of a 220 (actually 240 today) volt device be switched to avoid having a hot, un-grounded wire beyond the switch when it is in the "off" position. Often violated but does create an unsafe condition.
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post #7 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-08-2016, 09:00 AM
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https://www.amazon.com/Remote-Contro...=1&*entries*=0

Plug your DC into one, and carry the remote with you.
easy peasy lemon squeezy.
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post #8 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-08-2016, 11:04 AM
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https://www.amazon.com/Remote-Contro...=1&*entries*=0

Plug your DC into one, and carry the remote with you.
easy peasy lemon squeezy.
I wouldn't use those. They are designed for a single light, so the amp rating for them are going to be very low. For a DC that runs on 110, you are going to be drawing 15-20 amps. For DCs I strongly recommend either use the switch built-in on the unit, or use a remote switch (wired or wireless) that is made for the amp draw of your DC.

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post #9 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-08-2016, 11:17 AM
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from the amazon blurb....
The Remote Controlled Switch Sockets are ideal for the remote operation of many electrical devices including lamps appliances tools and more


But I am not familiar with USA 110 volts systems, so possibly this particular item might not be suitable, but a remote switching socket is the easiest way to solve the problem.
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post #10 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-08-2016, 01:29 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by senebraskaee View Post
Just as an FYI, I believe the various electrical codes require that both legs of a 220 (actually 240 today) volt device be switched to avoid having a hot, un-grounded wire beyond the switch when it is in the "off" position. Often violated but does create an unsafe condition.
I say that is bogus. In either case you have either 1 open circuit or 2 open circuits. Neither is more safe than the other, if I understand you correctly. If you only interrupt one wire, if that is possible need to look into it, you can't do anything to be more safe.

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