Any one for quoins? - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-16-2012, 02:10 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Ben
Posts: 167
 
Default Any one for quoins?

As many other users of this forum, I have gathered many good ideas and new and faster ways of creating sawdust. I am in the process of following several of Harry Sims Videos. (Thank you Harry)

Yesterday I finished my router skis. It is not pretty but should work OK. Also completed was a Jig for holding work pieces in preparation for inlaying.

As you know the inlay jig comprises several components including a rectangular fixed frame that surrounds the work piece which will be routed to receive the inlay.

Harry shows two ways of clamping the work piece to the base of the Jig. Method 1 shows nailing scrap wood around the work piece. Method 2 shows cams.

Looking at the entire system I had a flash back to my high school print shop (many long years ago). Type was prepared for printing by blocking the type into a fixed metal frame. This was much like blocking a wooden work piece into Harry's Jig.

The type is blocked into the frame by blocks of wood. Several blocks of wood spacers are inserted loosely between the block of type and the fixed frame. To tighten these spacer blocks a pair of metal wedges called quoins were inserted. We used the Hempel Style Quoins. They were wedges formed with gear teeth on the inside mating faces. the quoins would be placed between the wooden spacer blocks and tighten by a tee shaped quoin wench.

I think that this method would be a great way to block up a work piece for inlaying.

I have looked on E-Bay and found a couple of listings for quoins and quoin wrench. The items were apparently being sold as antiques and were priced accordingly.

Does anyone out there know if quoins are still commercially being produced?

If so, please give me a source.

Thanks
Ben

Forest Reduction Study Group
Ben in Cypress Texas is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-16-2012, 05:29 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 3,046
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben in Cypress Texas View Post
As many other users of this forum, I have gathered many good ideas and new and faster ways of creating sawdust. I am in the process of following several of Harry Sims Videos. (Thank you Harry)

Yesterday I finished my router skis. It is not pretty but should work OK. Also completed was a Jig for holding work pieces in preparation for inlaying.

As you know the inlay jig comprises several components including a rectangular fixed frame that surrounds the work piece which will be routed to receive the inlay.

Harry shows two ways of clamping the work piece to the base of the Jig. Method 1 shows nailing scrap wood around the work piece. Method 2 shows cams.

Looking at the entire system I had a flash back to my high school print shop (many long years ago). Type was prepared for printing by blocking the type into a fixed metal frame. This was much like blocking a wooden work piece into Harry's Jig.

The type is blocked into the frame by blocks of wood. Several blocks of wood spacers are inserted loosely between the block of type and the fixed frame. To tighten these spacer blocks a pair of metal wedges called quoins were inserted. We used the Hempel Style Quoins. They were wedges formed with gear teeth on the inside mating faces. the quoins would be placed between the wooden spacer blocks and tighten by a tee shaped quoin wench.

I think that this method would be a great way to block up a work piece for inlaying.

I have looked on E-Bay and found a couple of listings for quoins and quoin wrench. The items were apparently being sold as antiques and were priced accordingly.

Does anyone out there know if quoins are still commercially being produced?

If so, please give me a source.

Thanks
Ben

Hi Ben - I just cut wood wedges from 1x stock. I chop up several pieces of 1x stock into 8" lengths and use a tapering jig on the table saw. I make one end about 1/4" thick and taper out to about 3/4".

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.
jschaben is offline  
post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-16-2012, 05:51 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Country: United States
First Name: Bj
Posts: 23,786
       
Default

just one more way

==



Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	7134.jpg
Views:	104
Size:	67.9 KB
ID:	56757  


"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"

Marc Sommerfeld Tools ,Videos
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT-n...RWaEpMA/videos

Find all threads started by bobj3
http://www.routerforums.com/search.php?searchid=944097


bobj3 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-16-2012, 06:39 PM
Retired Moderator
 
Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 11,921
 
Send a message via Skype™ to Mike
Default

I have to agree with BJ on using the Router Workshop method. It is quick and easy as well as being infinitly adjustable. Poplar BJ?

Mike
"Living in the D" (this means Detroit!)
"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"
Mike is offline  
post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-16-2012, 08:02 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Ben
Posts: 167
 
Default

Gentlemen

Thanks for your response. I have a taper jig and will cut some wedges.

BJ is see that in your photo you have a Milescraft Design Inlay Kit. Mine just arrived UPS this afternoon. I haven't had time even to watch the enclosed DVD.

How do you like yours? any comments or cautions?

Regards
Ben

Forest Reduction Study Group
Ben in Cypress Texas is offline  
post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-16-2012, 08:42 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Country: United States
First Name: Bj
Posts: 23,786
       
Default

Hi Mike

Poplar=Yes

===
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike View Post
I have to agree with BJ on using the Router Workshop method. It is quick and easy as well as being infinitly adjustable. Poplar BJ?



"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"

Marc Sommerfeld Tools ,Videos
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT-n...RWaEpMA/videos

Find all threads started by bobj3
http://www.routerforums.com/search.php?searchid=944097


bobj3 is offline  
post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-16-2012, 08:43 PM
Registered User
 
N'awlins77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Lee
Posts: 1,622
 
Default

I have one too (Milescraft Inlay kit) but haven't had a chance to "play" with it yet.
N'awlins77 is offline  
post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-16-2012, 08:49 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Country: United States
First Name: Bj
Posts: 23,786
       
Default

Hi Ben

Yes that is the Milescraft inlay setup,I do like it ,it can used in many ways I do like the brass milescraft guides over the plastic ones I have melted down one or two of the plastic ones..my error getting the bit to close to the bit..

The drop in block is for the router table setup for the Router Workshop plate setup 11" x 11" but it can be for any size hole you have on your router table.. see below.. no clamps needed.

==
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben in Cypress Texas View Post
Gentlemen

Thanks for your response. I have a taper jig and will cut some wedges.

BJ is see that in your photo you have a Milescraft Design Inlay Kit. Mine just arrived UPS this afternoon. I haven't had time even to watch the enclosed DVD.

How do you like yours? any comments or cautions?

Regards
Ben


Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	7128.jpg
Views:	84
Size:	91.8 KB
ID:	56759  

Click image for larger version

Name:	7140.jpg
Views:	86
Size:	77.8 KB
ID:	56760  


"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"

Marc Sommerfeld Tools ,Videos
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT-n...RWaEpMA/videos

Find all threads started by bobj3
http://www.routerforums.com/search.php?searchid=944097



Last edited by bobj3; 11-16-2012 at 09:07 PM.
bobj3 is offline  
post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-16-2012, 09:02 PM
Official Greeter
 
jw2170's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Country: Australia
First Name: James
Posts: 18,132
 
Send a message via Skype™ to jw2170
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobj3 View Post
Hi Ben

Yes that is the Milescraft inlay setup,I do like it ,it can used in many ways I do like the brass milescraft guides over the plastic ones I have melted down one or two of the plastic ones..my error getting the bit to close to the bit..

==
Ordered mine yesterday, from Peachtree.

James
Sydney, Australia
.

I don't mind if other members disagree with my comments.
I don't profess to know everything, and I may learn something new.

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity."




jw2170 is online now  
post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-17-2012, 05:29 AM
Registered User
 
Hutzul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: N/a
Posts: 67
 
Red face Who Is Harry Sims ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben in Cypress Texas View Post
As many other users of this forum, I have gathered many good ideas and new and faster ways of creating sawdust. I am in the process of following several of Harry Sims Videos. (Thank you Harry)


Harry shows two ways of clamping the work piece to the base of the Jig. Method 1 shows nailing scrap wood around the work piece. Method 2 shows cams.

Looking at the entire system I had a flash back to my high school print shop (many long years ago). Type was prepared for printing by blocking the type into a fixed metal frame. This was much like blocking a wooden work piece into Harry's Jig.

The type is blocked into the frame by blocks of wood. Several blocks of wood spacers are inserted loosely between the block of type and the fixed frame. To tighten these spacer blocks a pair of metal wedges called quoins were inserted. We used the Hempel Style Quoins. They were wedges formed with gear teeth on the inside mating faces. the quoins would be placed between the wooden spacer blocks and tighten by a tee shaped quoin wench.

Ben
Hi Ben. I've been trying to find Harry Sims on youtube and also google, all I get is those cartoon characters.........

Will you ( or some kind soul) put me out of my misery and provide a link to Harry Sims please, pretty please ?

Cheers guys
Hutzul is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome