A small disappointment - Router Forums
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 5 (permalink) Old 04-13-2011, 09:14 AM Thread Starter
Honored Member
 
harrysin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Country: Australia
First Name: Harry
Posts: 14,332
     
Send a message via Skype™ to harrysin
Default A small disappointment

The first shot shows an order that I received last week from Pen Kits, Pen blanks, Clock Kits and wood turning accessories. here in Australia. The beautifully made pen press at only $40.00 made me very happy, on the web site it was described as a drilling and pen assembly jig. Well, the former was no problem, it worked well holding the blanks for drilling, then I read the instruction sheet which stated that in addition to a drilling jig it was a three stage jig for pressing in the brass tubes! This I just couldn't understand because the most common kits have a brass tube that is 7mm outside diameter and we drill a 7mm hole through the blanks so that after super glue is applied to the tube, it's simply pushed in and out a few times to spread the glue then the tube is pressed flush with one end against the bench covered with a tissue, no jig being required.
After the initial disappointment, I decided to do something about it as shown in these shots. I'm now very happy with a beautiful and very useful tool that only cost $40.00.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	latest-purchase.jpg
Views:	135
Size:	34.5 KB
ID:	43377  

Click image for larger version

Name:	pen-press1.jpg
Views:	127
Size:	53.2 KB
ID:	43378  

Click image for larger version

Name:	pen-press2.jpg
Views:	108
Size:	37.0 KB
ID:	43379  

Click image for larger version

Name:	pen-press3.jpg
Views:	96
Size:	35.4 KB
ID:	43380  

Click image for larger version

Name:	pen-press4.jpg
Views:	83
Size:	37.3 KB
ID:	43381  

Click image for larger version

Name:	pen-press5.jpg
Views:	82
Size:	35.5 KB
ID:	43382  

Click image for larger version

Name:	pen-press6.jpg
Views:	82
Size:	36.1 KB
ID:	43383  

Click image for larger version

Name:	pen-press7.jpg
Views:	78
Size:	34.2 KB
ID:	43384  

Click image for larger version

Name:	pen-press8.jpg
Views:	66
Size:	28.4 KB
ID:	43385  

Click image for larger version

Name:	pen-press9.jpg
Views:	66
Size:	20.3 KB
ID:	43386  

Click image for larger version

Name:	pen-press10.jpg
Views:	86
Size:	32.4 KB
ID:	43387  

Click image for larger version

Name:	pen-press11.jpg
Views:	74
Size:	30.5 KB
ID:	43388  

Click image for larger version

Name:	pen-press12.jpg
Views:	78
Size:	43.6 KB
ID:	43389  

Click image for larger version

Name:	pen-press13.jpg
Views:	81
Size:	36.8 KB
ID:	43390  

Click image for larger version

Name:	pen-press14.jpg
Views:	98
Size:	80.8 KB
ID:	43391  


Harry



Nothing but heaven itself is better than a friend who is really a friend. - Plautus






harrysin is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 5 (permalink) Old 04-13-2011, 09:45 PM
Registered User
 
N'awlins77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Lee
Posts: 1,622
 
Default

Hey Harry, looks like a helpful tool. But something caught my eye in the second pick. Is that a metal turning lathe in the top left corner? I looked in your uploads and found a somewhat better picture of it. You called it your pride and joy. I bet it is! Who's the manufacturer, and when you get some time, can you post some additional pics of it. I make my living as a metal cutting tool tech. I work on metal cutting lathes everyday. Well almost everyday. I also work on saws, mills, drills, radial arm drills and boring machines. Any manual metal cutting machines. We have other guys, young guys, who work on the CNC's. Which it crazy when I think about it. CNC repair is mostly changing circuit boards, changing parameters, not much physical stuff. Where as my job working on the manuals is more physical. Pulling sometimes big shafts and gears out of gearboxes. Which you can't get young guys interested in doing such manual labor anymore! ;o)

Any ole way.... That lathe caught my eye and I wouldn't mind seeing more pics of it and learning who the manufacturer is. Also, it looks like there's no auto feed on it, you crank that handle at the end of the lead screw to move the carriage? Or is there some type of auto feed that I can't see. If not, I bet it wouldn't take much to adapt a servo drive on there. Something similar to this --- Enco - Guaranteed Lowest Prices on Machinery, Tools and Shop Supplies

Enjoyed the tour of your shop!!
N'awlins77 is offline  
post #3 of 5 (permalink) Old 04-13-2011, 10:02 PM
Official Greeter
 
jw2170's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Country: Australia
First Name: James
Posts: 18,183
 
Send a message via Skype™ to jw2170
Default

Harry,

When are the additions to the shed planned........LOL

James
Sydney, Australia
.

I don't mind if other members disagree with my comments.
I don't profess to know everything, and I may learn something new.

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity."




jw2170 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 5 (permalink) Old 04-14-2011, 10:22 AM Thread Starter
Honored Member
 
harrysin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Country: Australia
First Name: Harry
Posts: 14,332
     
Send a message via Skype™ to harrysin
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by N'awlins77 View Post
Hey Harry, looks like a helpful tool. But something caught my eye in the second pick. Is that a metal turning lathe in the top left corner? I looked in your uploads and found a somewhat better picture of it. You called it your pride and joy. I bet it is! Who's the manufacturer, and when you get some time, can you post some additional pics of it. I make my living as a metal cutting tool tech. I work on metal cutting lathes everyday. Well almost everyday. I also work on saws, mills, drills, radial arm drills and boring machines. Any manual metal cutting machines. We have other guys, young guys, who work on the CNC's. Which it crazy when I think about it. CNC repair is mostly changing circuit boards, changing parameters, not much physical stuff. Where as my job working on the manuals is more physical. Pulling sometimes big shafts and gears out of gearboxes. Which you can't get young guys interested in doing such manual labor anymore! ;o)

Any ole way.... That lathe caught my eye and I wouldn't mind seeing more pics of it and learning who the manufacturer is. Also, it looks like there's no auto feed on it, you crank that handle at the end of the lead screw to move the carriage? Or is there some type of auto feed that I can't see. If not, I bet it wouldn't take much to adapt a servo drive on there. Something similar to this --- Enco - Guaranteed Lowest Prices on Machinery, Tools and Shop Supplies

Enjoyed the tour of your shop!!
I appreciate your interest, the lathe is a Myford ML7, probably the most popular model makers lathe ever made. Production commenced in England soon after world warII, in 1946 and continued until 1979, a span of 33 years. My particular machine was made in 1947! Using a set of change gears it can cut Imperial and metric threads and so does have auto traverse and a thread catcher. These shots that I took today explains it all. The lever to dis-engage the rotation simply removes tension from the drive belt. Parallel to the production of this model there was the "super 7" which had a quick change gear box and a clutch drive. Quite recently I saw a Super 7 that looked in immaculate condition going for $6000.00 and I was really tempted but then realised there was no point being in my 78th year.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	metalwork1.jpg
Views:	76
Size:	141.1 KB
ID:	43402  

Click image for larger version

Name:	metalwork2.jpg
Views:	68
Size:	144.9 KB
ID:	43403  

Click image for larger version

Name:	metalwork3.jpg
Views:	67
Size:	148.4 KB
ID:	43404  

Click image for larger version

Name:	metalwork4.jpg
Views:	64
Size:	140.5 KB
ID:	43405  

Click image for larger version

Name:	metalwork5.jpg
Views:	64
Size:	127.8 KB
ID:	43406  

Click image for larger version

Name:	metalwork6.jpg
Views:	66
Size:	116.6 KB
ID:	43407  

Click image for larger version

Name:	metalwork7.jpg
Views:	70
Size:	129.8 KB
ID:	43408  


Harry



Nothing but heaven itself is better than a friend who is really a friend. - Plautus







Last edited by harrysin; 04-14-2011 at 10:26 AM.
harrysin is online now  
post #5 of 5 (permalink) Old 04-14-2011, 10:20 PM
Registered User
 
N'awlins77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Lee
Posts: 1,622
 
Default

Verry cool, Harry! The handwheel on the end of the leadscrew through me off, as to it having auto feed capabilities. Never seen an old lathe, here in the states with one there.

It kinda reminds me of a vintage South Bend lathe, made in South Bend Indiana here in the states. The first South Bend, was made by the founders (Twins born in Ireland) in 1908. They don't make them like they use too! You can't even get a machine tool built in the U.S. anymore. The company I work for sells manual machines imported by Taiwan and the CNC machines come from Korea.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	South Bend lathe.jpg
Views:	52
Size:	40.0 KB
ID:	43422  

N'awlins77 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Setting Up a Small Wood Shop?? Advice Needed? WoodHaven Tools and Woodworking 63 08-31-2017 03:45 AM
Cutting small external radi don't look like circles more like small hexagons TroyB CNC Routing 6 06-22-2010 10:03 AM
Routing small pieces of timber colbra General Routing 11 07-01-2009 07:51 AM
small pieces fishlore Table-mounted Routing 58 11-21-2007 08:23 PM
routing small pieces zxxer12 General Routing 9 03-21-2005 04:40 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome