Gripper safety device - Router Forums
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post #1 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-29-2011, 10:49 AM Thread Starter
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Default Gripper safety device

Gripper a new safety device . 2004393
What do you think?
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post #2 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-29-2011, 10:58 AM
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I know a lot of people who have purchased them and love them. I had a plastic push stick come in contact with the blade which resulted in the stick being shattered and the piece becoming unsupported while trapped between the blade and the fence. The fact that the grrripper is made of plastic and metal has made me concerned about trying this because of the past experience.

I haven't made it yet, but I have been tempted to get a thick block of wood, but 60 grit sand paper on the bottom of it, and a good sturdy wooden handle to keep the hand away from the blade. I have wondered if this will do just as well as what the basic grrrripper will do.
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post #3 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-29-2011, 11:02 AM
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I use mine for thin wood and for narrow rips. But, I use my shop made, material specific pushers a lot more often.
IMO, I could've better used the $60.00 some where else.

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post #4 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-29-2011, 11:25 AM
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Take care. Just because you have a safety device, does not mean the process is safe.
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post #5 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-29-2011, 05:39 PM
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I've had one for awhile now. Works well for really small stuff. It is very easy to get the work piece cocked to the fence. Not much danger of kickback as the piece in under control the entire cut but you end up with an angled side.
Another issue is that doing longer pieces require (or recommended) two of the things and feeding hand over hand. That's an exercise I cannot seem to get comfortable with, not to mention $120 in push blocks at this point.
The last issue I have with it is that the blade guard, riving knife and kickback pawls must be removed to use it. Even though that stuff on my saw (ridgid 4510) is completely toolless, it becomes a PIA very quickly.
Just my observations

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.
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post #6 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-29-2011, 06:47 PM
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I'm thinking having two of them is overkill. Hand feeding longer pieces and using the grrrrrrrrrripper at the end of the cut would seem to be enough.

Mike
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post #7 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-29-2011, 09:43 PM
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Originally Posted by mpbc48 View Post
I'm thinking having two of them is overkill. Hand feeding longer pieces and using the grrrrrrrrrripper at the end of the cut would seem to be enough.

Mike
I haven't got two of them, It is recommended in the instructions though. IF I'm using it on a long(er) piece, I would use your method. Chances are I won't be though. More comfortable with featherboards. For really thin stuff I have one of those thin rip jigs from Rockler which works OK but I think a featherboard works just as well for that application also.

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.
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post #8 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-29-2011, 10:41 PM
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Hi John,

I agree with you on the featherboards. I'm certainly more comfortable with them.

I think I would put myself in danger if I were to try that hand over hand manuver. I'm not the most coordinated person and need to keep things simple.

Heck, I've barely learned to walk while chewing gum.

Mike
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post #9 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-29-2011, 11:30 PM
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The Grrripper isn't new. It's been out for at least 10 years now. I have 3 of them, two for the table saw and one for use with the router table (with the 1/4" side piece removed) and I can't work without Grrrippers anymore.

They have much better gripping power than anything else that I've used and are a giant step forward in table saw and router table safety equipment. If you watch Micro Jig's videos and learn how to properly use the Grrrippers you will quickly appreciate how much safer they are to use over the old push sticks, etc. One of their best features is their ability to hold both the part being cut and the off-cut in a perfect positional relationship all the way through the saw blade to where you can slide both pieces around the spinning blade and back to the front edge of the table without ever releasing control of the Grrripper or the 2 pieces of wood. The blade gap remains the same width during this, right up until the Grrripper is lifted off of them after the cut has been completed. They also hold the piece being cut tighter against the fence than you could ever do by your hand and push sticks, resulting in consistently more accurately cut parts. The training videos are on Youtube, so they can be watched for free, or you can buy their DVD for $10.

I'm working in the workshop of a large science museum. Last week I took my two GR-200 Grrrippers there to demonstrate how well they work for me on a table saw and router table, and to show them how to use the Grrrippers properly. They were highly impressed and will likely be ordering Grrrippers next week. If you own a Grrripper, do yourself a big favor and learn how to properly use it by watching the videos on Youtube. Once you understand what they can do, I'm certain that you will use them, begin to like them, and will then be showing others how to use them.


I'm not connected with Micro Jig in any way, except for being a very satisfied owner/user. They're expensive, but very much worth it for the safety and cutting accuracy improvements that they make.

Charley
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post #10 of 25 (permalink) Old 04-29-2011, 11:54 PM
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Hi John,
Heck, I've barely learned to walk while chewing gum.

Mike
YOU CAN DO THAT!!!

Seriously - Charley, I do respect your opinion and I have watched the videos but just haven't been able to get comfortable with it on the table saw. I do use it quite a bit on the router table and always on small pieces on the table saw. Aggravating part about small pieces is sometimes the piece will slip a bit when putting the thing on the workpiece so I end up running it through at an angle. Generally don't notice until I go to assemble everything and this one part isn't square.

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.
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