Routing a thru slot with a Milescraft edge guide - Router Forums
 
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 06-06-2011, 11:35 AM Thread Starter
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Default Routing a thru slot with a Milescraft edge guide

Yesterday, I decided to experiment with the video capability of my "still" camera. Here's the result:

http://youtu.be/e6hHKsg3b58

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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 06-06-2011, 12:05 PM
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is this it ????

YouTube - ‪Routing a Thru Slot Using an Edge Jig‬‏

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Last edited by bobj3; 06-06-2011 at 12:19 PM.
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 06-06-2011, 12:09 PM Thread Starter
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I can't open youtube at work. I'll fix the link later if it's not working. If you search for "Tunacube", you'll find it too.

Thanks,

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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 06-07-2011, 09:45 AM
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You really need to secure your stock better. That's an accident waiting to happen. Also, use the plunge depth stops to take more controlled depths of cut. You are overloading your router at times, also dangerous for both you and your router.

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Originally Posted by CharleyL View Post
You really need to secure your stock better. That's an accident waiting to happen. Also, use the plunge depth stops to take more controlled depths of cut. You are overloading your router at times, also dangerous for both you and your router.

Charley
I picked up on that too

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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 06-07-2011, 10:30 AM
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Hi

I'm a big fan of the MilesCraft items but this looks like a job for the ski jig to me..


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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 06-07-2011, 04:16 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by CharleyL View Post
You really need to secure your stock better. That's an accident waiting to happen. Also, use the plunge depth stops to take more controlled depths of cut. You are overloading your router at times, also dangerous for both you and your router.

Charley
Actually, the stock was held quite firmly. I was suprised at how well it stayed put. It was really very safe. By the way, that was a Harbor Freight 3/8" dia HSS bit that came with a 1/4" and a 1/2" bit for about $12.

I was cutting 12 slots in 2x4 (1.5+ inches deep) and I didn't want to have to re-set the stops for each pass, so I estimated the depth of each cut. On that particular piece, I did take too much depth on the second pass; you can hear the motor straining. I guess I was trying to make the cut in only 3 passes, so I didn't want to adjust the depth. I finally did toward the end of the cut. The funny thing is that I didn't know that my little $129 camera recorded sound! Suprise suprise! For the other 11 pieces, I managed to estimate the depth of each cut much better.

“The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”
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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 06-07-2011, 04:25 PM Thread Starter
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Hi

I'm a big fan of the MilesCraft items but this looks like a job for the ski jig to me..


=========
Nope - the edge jig was the best way to do this. With skis, it would have been harder to clamp the workpiece since I would have had to clamp it down as well. I had to cut 3 different slots in 4 pieces of wood each (12 slots). I wanted to be able to quickly set up the router and quickly change out each piece. The stops on two sides worked very well, along with a single end stop for the router (small piece of 2x4 on right). Aside from that, I don't like skis very much. There is one that has the bars NOT go thru the router base which I think is the right way to go if you don't want to, dedicate a router to a set of skis. That said, I'll probably use a my skis to flatten the slabs I have drying (about 2 years from now).

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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 06-08-2011, 10:37 AM
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Your desire for speed and minimal clamping is going to get you hurt. Take the time to find a better way or at least improve on your set-up and methods to make it safer.

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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 06-08-2011, 02:24 PM Thread Starter
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Your desire for speed and minimal clamping is going to get you hurt. Take the time to find a better way or at least improve on your set-up and methods to make it safer.

Charley
THIS WAS A VERY SAFE SETUP! I don't think the video shows the settup clearly.

My main concern was whether the router would pull itself toward the edged guide. It didn't. The setup was much more stable than I anticipated (maybe this is the prevailing issue). At one point in the video, you can see the workpiece move when I place the router on it. This is the beauty of this setup - very stable, yet very easy and quick to setup and use. I was very pleased with the edge guide and this was not the first method I considered for doing this.

The work is completely clamped when being cut. There were 2 stops: one between me and the workpiece (which can't be seen in the vide) and another on my left (video right). The router base holds it in the vertical direction and the guide holds the side opposite me. There's only one side not held; the one to my right (video left). Since I'm cutting a slot, the net load is toward the cutting direction (i.e. toward the stop on my left/video right) and toward the stop between me and the workpiece (so the workpiece is being pushed into the corner between the 2 stops). I even caught an edge when I (carelessly) pulled the router off before releasing the plunge base and all that happened was a nick in the slot.

It was a very safe setup! In fact, it was much safer than using a table saw without a splitter, or blade guard, which is done all the time. I'm actually more wary when welding with 100+ amps going thru the elctrode holder I hold in my hand. I would guess that the odds of getting hurt using this setup are lower than getting into a serious accident (i.e. excluding minor fender benders) while driving to, or from, work.

“The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”
George Bernard Shaw

Robert
Redondo Beach, CA

Last edited by RJM60; 06-08-2011 at 02:28 PM.
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