Surfacing 4' x 8' glued up panels - Router Forums
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post #1 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-06-2012, 07:09 AM Thread Starter
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Default Surfacing 4' x 8' glued up panels

Hello everyone,

I am building a setup for surfacing 4 x 8 glued up solid stock panels. I have purchased 4 pcs of linear shafting with the linear bearings on ebay (around $300) and instead of the usual way of using a wooden jig I plan to run the router on the linear slides with a 2-1/2" surfacing bit.

Anyone have any input on things I should could or how to add to this project to improve it. This is a common task and I want something that will be fast and clean. Budget within reason is not an issue.

Thanks,
-Eloy
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post #2 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-06-2012, 08:12 AM
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Hello!
Well , you can make nice piece of machinery out of your linear shafting!
You did'nt say what lenght you bought.
Like router-lathe , routing slots , universal precision sliding mitre for router and circular saw, a copiing 3d router,
Many things.
IMHO:But just for cleaning surface, i' ll consider Harrysin ski system, its costless, fast to make and quite efficient!

The only point that could make this design fail a litle precision is the router's base:
Some bases uses too thin steel bars, some give an angle, when you screw router lock
to the steel bars, then the router is not staying horizontal , needs a bit of adjusting.

http://www.routerforums.com/jigs-fix...uter-skis.html

Regards
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post #3 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-06-2012, 08:32 AM
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Trying to make 4' X 8' panels from solid wood does not sound to me like it will be very successful. With any change in humidity the panel will change shape. It may be flat one day, but look like a potato chip the next. Wood changes it's size too much with moisture content changes for this to work out well.

In fine furniture and paneled room construction it has been common to break up larger areas into frame and panel designs to allow the wood panels to move with changes in moisture content. It's a lot more work to do this type of construction, but it works out very well. I would never try to make a solid wood panel larger than about 1' X 2' and expect it to remain very flat, unless it was built into a frame with provision for it to move within this frame for any changes in moisture content.

Charley
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post #4 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-06-2012, 09:24 AM Thread Starter
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Good point Charlie,

I have had to go to a three ply glue up to solve that problem. I A little trickey to get three levels thick by 4' wide but using cawl's it can be done. It takes work but these are very expensive projects. Thanks for pointing that out. I normaly just laminate to a pc of MDF but some clients insist on "solid wood"

-Eloy
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post #5 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-06-2012, 09:32 AM Thread Starter
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Hello Gerard, good tip. I am building the same principle as the ski's but more ridgid. By the way, on the linear slides I will have 12' x 6' of travel.

-Eloy
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post #6 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-06-2012, 01:49 PM
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I am working on a set of skis like Bobj3 has and pictured below. Mine is 24 inches long with a cut down phenolic router table insert plate for the router. Going to use a Milwaukee 5615-20 router with the handles removed and a 2-1/4 diameter drawer lock bit to plane the stock. Got the extrusion off Ebay for around $30.00 shipped. The holes in the ends of the extrusion are perfect for tapping 1/4-20 threads to attach knobs for height adjustments. As it stands I will have invested less than $60.00 when finished excluding the router of course.

I also have a Woodhaven planing jig that is a monster and as such will plane larger stock than the ski will. I wanted the ski to plane 50 or 60 boards that average 12 x 6 x 3/4 down to 5/8 or less depending on the application as well as being easier to take down and store when not in use.
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post #7 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-06-2012, 05:03 PM
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Without knowing the size and type of shafting you have, it would be hard to predict how it will act as far as deflection goes.

I used to design industrial machinery such as this, before I became disabled, and for the size of project you're going to do, shaft deflection will be a problem, unless you have some pretty big shafting and bearings. Shaft deflection can mean an uneven cut, and vibration.

Normally, for a project of this size, the shafting to be used on the longest length you have, which will be 8 feet, plus some for the carriage, should be the supported rail-shafting mounted down to a fixed and very sturdy table. This is the shafting that mounts down onto a solid aluminum riser, and goes completely under the shafting making it into a rail. If you tried to use, say two pieces of shafting only supported by its ends at around 9 to 10 feet long, it could cause a vibration when the cutter was mid-way in the work, especially if you took a very heavy cut. The other direction, or axis, will be a little over 4 feet, and you could probably get by with end supported shafting here, as long as its big enough.

An idea would be to take a look at a CNC routers construction of something this size, and see what was required to do it without vibration.

Last edited by WillMatney; 03-07-2012 at 01:31 PM. Reason: spelling
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post #8 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-06-2012, 05:16 PM
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Hello!
Interesting project!
can you send picts?
Are you making some sort of real heavy plywood or am I wrong?

My grand father made a table like that. still got it , he made a 45 frame around it.
It never did move, but at this time,They where patient.
I'm very sure he did use some 20 to 50 Years of drying wood.

Some of the best woods for difficult jobs are the wooden beams and framing took
out at destruction of old houses.

Regards.
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post #9 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-07-2012, 01:42 PM
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Default Extrusions

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Originally Posted by Ken Bee View Post
I am working on a set of skis like Bobj3 has and pictured below. Mine is 24 inches long with a cut down phenolic router table insert plate for the router. Going to use a Milwaukee 5615-20 router with the handles removed and a 2-1/4 diameter drawer lock bit to plane the stock. Got the extrusion off Ebay for around $30.00 shipped. The holes in the ends of the extrusion are perfect for tapping 1/4-20 threads to attach knobs for height adjustments. As it stands I will have invested less than $60.00 when finished excluding the router of course.

I also have a Woodhaven planing jig that is a monster and as such will plane larger stock than the ski will. I wanted the ski to plane 50 or 60 boards that average 12 x 6 x 3/4 down to 5/8 or less depending on the application as well as being easier to take down and store when not in use.
If he used something similar to the 80/20 extrusions for the long rails, on the 8' axis, like the 2" x 4" sections, he would be better off, or I would think. They also have the nylon linear bearings to fit the extrusions, and the extrusions could be easily mounted to a table or level floor. He could then use the round rods and bearings for the other axis, but my guess is that he would need at least 1" diameter rods, or larger, to stop any vibration.

He's using a 2-1/2" bit, which takes a good size router, and it creates a good amount of cutting force, so I'm worried about him getting vibration, and sway or sag in the rods over a long distance. The idea of the tubing is a good one.
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post #10 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-08-2012, 12:48 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the response Will,

You made some good points. I have 25mm supported shafting, The long rails will be mounted to a table so I am sure they will be fine. What is your opinion on the cross travel since it will only have the additional rigidity of the rail support. Since it will be inverted I will have spacing brackets over both ends over the long travel shafting. The plate to mount the router will be recessed to get the spindle down to the work. I would appreciate knowing what you think.

-Eloy
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