Circular saw crosscut jig? - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 03-12-2012, 03:48 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
GulfcoastGuy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Patrick
Posts: 882
 
Default Circular saw crosscut jig?

I'm in need of a plan for an accurate (possibly adjustable/calibratable) crosscut jig for use with a circular saw. I want to be able to test for square and tweak the jig to zero in on the squarest cut I can achieve. I have an idea but since I don't have enough posts to submit a drawing I thought I'd ask around.

GCG
GulfcoastGuy is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 03-12-2012, 07:19 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Chris
Posts: 1,298
 
Default

i'd love to see one too.

as to squareness, the edges of the face plate are made to be parallel to the blade at the factory, and they are not adjustable (at least i have never seen one). if they are not parallel, you probably need a new saw.

so couldn't you just clamp a straight board to the piece you are cutting parallel to the cut you want to make? measure the distance from the edge of the blade to the edge of the faceplate, and then measure that distance on both ends of the piece and clamp the board there.

alternatively, bobj has a track and runner setup that makes sure the saw stays on the line.
Chris Curl is offline  
post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 03-12-2012, 10:01 PM
Official Greeter
 
jw2170's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Country: Australia
First Name: James
Posts: 18,197
 
Send a message via Skype™ to jw2170
Default

This is the simplest I have seen - use this one myself.....

MAKING STRAIGHT CUTS WITH A HOMEMADE JIG - YouTube

hardboard base with 1/2" ply fence.....

James
Sydney, Australia
.

I don't mind if other members disagree with my comments.
I don't profess to know everything, and I may learn something new.

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity."




jw2170 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 03-12-2012, 11:36 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
GulfcoastGuy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Patrick
Posts: 882
 
Default

Thanks but that jig I have. What I need is one to make a crosscut at 90 deg. referenced to the straight edge that jig produces, preferably off a single measurement along that edge.

I've seen some on YouTube and elsewhere but they all assume a true 90 off a frameing square or the like. This is used to attach another fence on the underside perpendicular to the cut fence on the top. Once the 90 is established the reference fence is fixed to the jig with screws and glue.

The reference fence is registered to a straight edge of the panel or board and the cut fence sets up the 90 deg. cut.

What I have in mind is one step further. Do the initial setup with the frameing square but just clamp it in place. Drill and insert a dowel at the intersection of the two fences to be used to both anchor the two at that point and to provide a pivot point. Further toward the other end of the reference fence awat from the cut but still under the runner board (didn't know what else to call it) drill a pilot hole to act as a guide for a adjustment screw in the reference fence and a slightly oversized hole in the runner. The runner would be extra wide to have some meat on the side of the cut fence oposite the cut

Calibration:

With the screw holding the jig to the original square from the frameing square, make a cut on a test board. Flip the test board horizontally keeping the reference edge against the reference fence and make a cut on the other side of the test board. Assuming some error in square the length measured at the base of the test board and the top will be different by twice the amount the jig is out of square. Loosen the adjustment screw for a friction contact, move the refernce fence to correct, retighten the screw and repeat the proceedure. When you reach the level of accuracy desired another dowel can be inserted near the screw to lock the jig in place and other screws can be used for reinforcement.

GCG
GulfcoastGuy is offline  
post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 03-13-2012, 02:39 AM
Official Greeter
 
jw2170's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Country: Australia
First Name: James
Posts: 18,197
 
Send a message via Skype™ to jw2170
Default

Square-Cut

You might be thinking of something along these lines.

Or attach a batten at right angles to the jig in the previous video. Once it's set, its set....

I mark a line with the framing square and then line my jig up on that line, then clamp in place....

James
Sydney, Australia
.

I don't mind if other members disagree with my comments.
I don't profess to know everything, and I may learn something new.

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity."




jw2170 is offline  
post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 03-13-2012, 09:48 AM
Registered User
 
Gene Howe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Country: United States
First Name: Gene
Posts: 9,750
 
Default

That's a neat jig, James. If I were cutting a lot of 2X material, I think $11 would be a great investment. As it is, I just align my saw blade with the cut line and slide the "Speed Square" to the saw plate.
For anything wider than 12", I use my red neck track saw.
Gene
Quote:
Originally Posted by jw2170 View Post
Square-Cut

You might be thinking of something along these lines.

Or attach a batten at right angles to the jig in the previous video. Once it's set, its set....

I mark a line with the framing square and then line my jig up on that line, then clamp in place....

Gene Howe
Snowflake, AZ

'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

Please edit your profile with a name and location so we can better assist you and make for a friendlier forum.
Gene Howe is offline  
post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 03-13-2012, 09:56 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Chris
Posts: 1,298
 
Default

just take a 18" piece of 1x4 and a 18" piece 1x2. make sure they are perfectly straight. glue and screw them perpendicular to each other near one end of the 1x4 piece. make sure it is exactly 90*. how you make them exactly 90* is up to you. there are lots of ways.

then run the saw along the 1x4 piece to cut the 1x2 piece at the blade. there is your jig.

now all you have to do is line up the edge of the cut off part of the with your line and clamp it in place. it would look like this:


Last edited by Chris Curl; 03-13-2012 at 10:09 AM.
Chris Curl is offline  
post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 03-13-2012, 01:43 PM
Registered User
 
Ken Bee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Country: United States
First Name: Ken
Posts: 483
 
Default

Here is a fairly simple circular crosscut jig if this what you had in mind.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Circular Saw Crosscut Guide.jpg
Views:	5398
Size:	116.1 KB
ID:	50865  


When something is advertised as being foolproof there is always a better class of fool that comes along to prove them wrong.
Ken Bee is offline  
post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 03-13-2012, 04:00 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
GulfcoastGuy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Patrick
Posts: 882
 
Default

@James
I've seen the Square Cut. Bench Dog and Stanley both have similar products and that's what I'd go with if the pieces were narrow ... up to say 12". I'm going to have panels at around 20" - maybe more. I have two framing squares and both are off by more than a thin pencil mark at 24". I guess I could pop one of them with a punch a couple of times and see if that corrects the error. Then I could use that to make the batten modified jig that you and, later, Chris described.

Thanks all for the input.

GCG
GulfcoastGuy is offline  
post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 03-13-2012, 04:53 PM
Registered User
 
DaninVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Canada
First Name: Dan
Posts: 14,008
 
Default

I'm guessing you considered a good quality drywall T square?
Wal-Board Calibrated T-Square 54 in. - 1/8 in. WTS-54 (WLB-88-016) | WallTools.com

Obviously you wouldn't be able to make the sawcut without damaging the Tee, but they're sure convenient for the layout part.
Unlike a framing sq. the Tee arm is undermounted making for a really solid contact with the reference edge...not prone to slipping off.
I use mine for plywood layout as well as drywall; no complaint.
DaninVan is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Porter Cable 55160 Omnijig Review Echonav Tool Reviews 19 06-21-2015 03:59 AM
Shelf pin hole jig - reviews and router solution Greg_R Jigs and Fixtures 17 04-24-2014 09:02 PM
Adjustable Jig for Crosscut Sled curiousgeorge curiousgeorge's Gallery 9 11-12-2013 04:30 PM
Akeda BC24 Dovetail Jig arrived! Michael H Jigs and Fixtures 13 04-11-2012 10:50 PM
Hinge mortising question Dalec Jigs and Fixtures 8 03-02-2009 07:17 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome