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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-25-2012, 01:37 PM Thread Starter
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Ski jig's are very usefull items to have. Keep in mind that a plunge router is the best choice for maximum utility. Since you own a Bosch 1604 I built this jig to give you a way to get started. I used a 1601 which is in effect the same router. Start by removing the wooden knobs and place them in a Zip lock bag for safe keeping. Since I often do this I mark the bag with the routers model number. Remove the sub base plate and keep it handy; you will use this to mark the hole locations on the mounting plate. I built this jig from scraps on hand and only purchased the hardware for less than $10.

Parts required: (From any good hardware store)
8 each: 1/4" - 20 x 2" hanger bolts
8 each: 1/4" - 20 solid wing nuts (Do not use the stamped kind as they do not last)
8 each: 1/4" flat washers
2 each: 1/4" - 20 nuts (For installing the hanger bolts)
6 each: #8 x 3/4" flat head wood screws
1 each: 6" x 7" Lexan 1/4" thick. (The hardware store will cut this for you)

Note: I used an old piece of used Plexiglas for my mounting plate. One of the corners chipped off and this is not important because 4 screws will hold the router. The extra hole in the plate was from another jig and does not effect performance.

Note: I used an old piece of Plexiglas for the mounting plate. One corner chipped off when mounting it to the rails; this really doesn't matter because 4 screws are enough to hold the router.

Baltic birch plywood parts, do not substitute other types of plywood:
2 short rails: 1-1/4" x 6" x 1/2" thick
2 long rails: 1-1/2" x 18" x 1/2" thick
2 Risers: 5" x 8" x 3/4" thick

This job requires a 5/16" straight or spiral bit and a 1/4" roundover bit.

Set up your router table with the 5/16" straight bit and adjust it so the center is 3/4" from your fence. Cut the slots in the long rails leaving 1-1/2" on each end. Cut the slots in the Risers leaving 1/2" on each end. Next install your 1/4" roundover bit and round over the two top corners of the risers then roundover the ends and top on both sides of the risers.

Drill/countersink the 6 holes and attach the short rails to the ends of the Lexan mounting plate with the #8 screws. Center your drill bit on the ends of all the rails and drill the holes for the hanger bolts. Install the hanger bolts by jambing the two nuts on the end of the bolt and turning them in.

Drill the center hole in the mounting plate using a 1-3/4" Forstner bit or hole saw. Assemble the H frame with the washers and wing nuts. Your sub base plate will fit into the frame; Mark the mounting hole locations with a Sharpie marker, remove the plate and drill/countersink the holes from the bottom side of the plate.

Adjusting the ski jig:
With the H frame sitting on a level surface tighten the wing nuts on the short rails. Set the H frame on two spacers known to be square. (I use 1,2,3 blocks for this) Add the risers, washers and wing nuts on the ends and tighten. It is important to do this EVERY time you set up the jig. Attach your routers base to the mounting plate and drop in the motor.
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Last edited by Mike; 09-26-2012 at 07:27 PM.
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-26-2012, 07:18 AM
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OK, I'll bite......What type of work will this jig allow you to do? Sorry, I am unfamiliar with this jig and what it might do for you....Thanks for sharing! John
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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-26-2012, 07:52 AM
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I'll leave this one for Harry........LOl

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post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-26-2012, 09:38 AM Thread Starter
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John, ski jig's offer great control and safety. One very handy feature is the ability to surface plane boards. They greatly enhance working with guide bushings and templates. Making freehand signs is very easy with a ski jig.

See the photo below of Harry delivering the ski jig tutorial to the forums.
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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-26-2012, 09:55 AM
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You cheeky sod!

Harry



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post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-26-2012, 10:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jw2170 View Post
I'll leave this one for Harry........LOl
Here are just a few taken from my many threads. Rather like a radial arm saw, one's imagination is the limiting factor as to what can be achieved with a ski mounted router.
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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-26-2012, 11:41 AM
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Hi Mike

Nice job ,,,,now we know that's it's Not written in STONE how to make a ski jig, or how to use them
I for one have used threaded rod and it works very well..

===

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike View Post
Ski jig's are very usefull items to have. Keep in mind that a plunge router is the best choice for maximum utility. Since you own a Bosch 1604 I built this jig to give you a way to get started. I used a 1601 which is in effect the same router. Start by removing the wooden knobs and place them in a Zip lock bag for safe keeping. Since I often do this I mark the bag with the routers model number. Remove the sub base plate and keep it handy; you will use this to mark the hole locations on the mounting plate. I built this jig from scraps on hand and only purchased the hardware for less than $10.

Parts required: (From any good hardware store)
8 each: 1/4" - 20 x 2" hanger bolts
8 each: 1/4" - 20 solid wing nuts (Do not use the stamped kind as they do not last)
8 each: 1/4" flat washers
2 each: 1/4" - 20 nuts (For installing the hanger bolts)
6 each: #8 x 3/4" flat head wood screws
1 each: 6" x 7" Lexan 1/4" thick. (The hardware store will cut this for you)

Note: I used an old piece of used Plexiglas for my mounting plate. One of the corners chipped off and this is not important because 4 screws will hold the router. The extra hole in the plate was from another jig and does not effect performance.

Note: I used an old piece of Plexiglas for the mounting plate. One corner chipped off when mounting it to the rails; this really doesn't matter because 4 screws are enough to hold the router.

Baltic birch plywood parts, do not substitute other types of plywood:
2 short rails: 1-1/4" x 6" x 1/2" thick
2 long rails: 1-1/2" x 18" x 1/2" thick
2 Risers: 5" x 8" x 3/4" thick

This job requires a 5/16" straight or spiral bit and a 1/4" roundover bit.

Set up your router table with the 5/16" straight bit and adjust it so the center is 3/4" from your fence. Cut the slots in the long rails leaving 1-1/2" on each end. Cut the slots in the Risers leaving 1/2" on each end. Next install your 1/4" roundover bit and round over the two top corners of the risers then roundover the ends and top on both sides of the risers.

Drill/countersink the 6 holes and attach the short rails to the ends of the Lexan mounting plate with the #8 screws. Center your drill bit on the ends of all the rails and drill the holes for the hanger bolts. Install the hanger bolts by jambing the two nuts on the end of the bolt and turning them in.

Drill the center hole in the mounting plate using a 1-3/4" Forstner bit or hole saw. Assemble the H frame with the washers and wing nuts. Your sub base plate will fit into the frame; Mark the mounting hole locations with a Sharpie marker, remove the plate and drill/countersink the holes from the bottom side of the plate.

Adjusting the ski jig:
With the H frame sitting on a level surface tighten the wing nuts on the short rails. Set the H frame on two spacers known to be square. (I use 1,2,3 blocks for this) Add the risers, washers and wing nuts on the ends and tighten. It is important to do this EVERY time you set up the jig. Attach your routers base to the mounting plate and drop in the motor.



"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"

Marc Sommerfeld Tools ,Videos
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT-n...RWaEpMA/videos

Find all threads started by bobj3
http://www.routerforums.com/search.php?searchid=944097



Last edited by Mike; 09-26-2012 at 07:27 PM.
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post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-26-2012, 05:18 PM
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for a threaded rod application with 3/8" rods, in your all's opinion, how long can the rods be before sagging becomes an issue?

my routers (ryobi) have 3/8" rod openings.

Last edited by Chris Curl; 09-26-2012 at 07:59 PM.
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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-26-2012, 05:38 PM
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28" will do the trick, I have some 36" long they sag a little bit but it's not a big deal because the router is on top of the projects most of the time anyway..

Most don't know the ski jig is just a router table upside down so to speak...and you move the router over the wood..

===




"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"

Marc Sommerfeld Tools ,Videos
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT-n...RWaEpMA/videos

Find all threads started by bobj3
http://www.routerforums.com/search.php?searchid=944097


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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-26-2012, 07:26 PM Thread Starter
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Chris, the sagging issue with the smaller rod diameter was something that concerned me along with the difficulty for most people to come up with the steel rods. I felt the plywood was an elegant and inexpensive solution that everyone could use. My inspiration for this was looking at one of BJ's threaded rod jigs. This is a point I keep repeating: We all benefit when members share photos of their projects.

BJ... "Set in stone"... too funny! I was on Skype with Harry when he read this thread and I wish everyone could of heard him laughing about the photo.

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