Exterior House Door Raised Panel Jig - Router Forums
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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-28-2012, 08:47 AM Thread Starter
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Default Exterior House Door Raised Panel Jig

" For kitchen doors and furniture, a raised panel cutter for a router will cost in the region of £30 + and only produce a moulding 25 – 40mm on to the panel.
To produce what I wanted would need a spindle moulder (wood shaper) and tooling."

I need to make chunky, substantial raised panels for interior, exterior house doors. I found this panel jig that seems to be able to do the job. I emailed the guy who posted the information, asking about his design.

How to Make Raised Panels for a Door without expensive router cutters

I asked him,

" Hi,
I'd like to have a go at making this jig. Could you give me any help like angle of triangle and various dimensions?
Thanks,
Peter. "

He replied,

" Hi Peter,
Sorry I can't help much with the specifics as it all depends on the angles you want and the sizes of the panels. I think the best way is just to knock something up and refine it if you need too. It doesn't have to pretty, just fairly stable.
Good luck with it. "

Any help on putting a version of this jig together much appreciated ? Perhaps devising a method of changing the angle, a pivot point, a circular slot with locking knob. A method of clamping to router table?

Cheers.
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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-28-2012, 11:28 AM
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Default I'll try to answer some of those questions...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaia View Post
" For kitchen doors and furniture, a raised panel cutter for a router will cost in the region of £30 + and only produce a moulding 25 – 40mm on to the panel.
To produce what I wanted would need a spindle moulder (wood shaper) and tooling."

I need to make chunky, substantial raised panels for interior, exterior house doors. I found this panel jig that seems to be able to do the job. I emailed the guy who posted the information, asking about his design.

How to Make Raised Panels for a Door without expensive router cutters

I asked him,

" Hi,
I'd like to have a go at making this jig. Could you give me any help like angle of triangle and various dimensions?
Thanks,
Peter. "

He replied,

" Hi Peter,
Sorry I can't help much with the specifics as it all depends on the angles you want and the sizes of the panels. I think the best way is just to knock something up and refine it if you need too. It doesn't have to pretty, just fairly stable.
Good luck with it. "

Any help on putting a version of this jig together much appreciated ? Perhaps devising a method of changing the angle, a pivot point, a circular slot with locking knob. A method of clamping to router table?

Cheers.
Changing the angle ought to be straightforward enough. make the jig with a flat piece of MDF or plywood (as the original jig builder suggested) as a 'cutting deck' if I may call it that, but instead of fixing the edge at the pointy end, hinge it with two lengths of piano hinge, leaving a gap for the router cutter obviously. I would guess his jig's fixed angle was about 20 deg - you are not likely to be making a panel too far off that, maybe plus/minus 7 degrees or so? All you need do then is devise a solid clamping system to lock the cutting deck at your preferred angle - nuts and bolts, knobs, whatever you have.
I don't understand why you'd want to clamp it to the router table, since it will be pushing past the cutter. How you'll guide it consistently past the cutter will depend totally on your table and what sort of grooves, tracks or channels are in it - whatever is there will determine how you control the jig. Maybe...the original builder is just relying on the fence to keep it straight, notice that he has quite a long fence, and nothing seems to be running in the channels on the router table.

Here's his pic again for reference:



Have a go at it and refine as you learn - often I find the Mk II version of my jigs is when things begin to come right. Be careful not to have the router bit sticking up to an unsafe extent, or you'll end up with a custom bit to rout around corners like this one I invented:





John
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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-28-2012, 01:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JCJCJC View Post
Changing the angle ought to be straightforward enough. make the jig with a flat piece of MDF or plywood (as the original jig builder suggested) as a 'cutting deck' if I may call it that, but instead of fixing the edge at the pointy end, hinge it with two lengths of piano hinge, leaving a gap for the router cutter obviously. I would guess his jig's fixed angle was about 20 deg - you are not likely to be making a panel too far off that, maybe plus/minus 7 degrees or so? All you need do then is devise a solid clamping system to lock the cutting deck at your preferred angle - nuts and bolts, knobs, whatever you have.
I don't understand why you'd want to clamp it to the router table, since it will be pushing past the cutter. How you'll guide it consistently past the cutter will depend totally on your table and what sort of grooves, tracks or channels are in it - whatever is there will determine how you control the jig. Maybe...the original builder is just relying on the fence to keep it straight, notice that he has quite a long fence, and nothing seems to be running in the channels on the router table.

Here's his pic again for reference:



Have a go at it and refine as you learn - often I find the Mk II version of my jigs is when things begin to come right. Be careful not to have the router bit sticking up to an unsafe extent, or you'll end up with a custom bit to rout around corners like this one I invented:





John
John-

On clamping the jig the OP is looking at... Because that one has legs/supports that would hit the bit if it moved. That jig is like a table extension, angling the table and having the bit through the table, so you slide the panel over the face of the jig as if it were the table..

From what you say, you seem to be used to the jig I'm used to which is an adjustable angle router jig (sled), which slides in the miter slot, the work extends over the lip of the sled over the bit at an angle and the work is clamped to the jig while it slides. You use piano hinge - I just use regular hinges.

Peter-

Both jigs would do you. The jig you asked about would do you if you have a small table on your router table and your panels were long. IMHO- The one we mentioned would also work and might be more worthwhile to you in the long run. As being adjustable, if you find that the first angle you intended to use just doesn't look quite right to you (because it is too far or too close to the edge), you can change it, without having to build another fixed angle jig. And you can also re-use it for many other things.

Actually, that jig is just 2 pieces of rectangular stock hinged together on one side... 2 other pieces of stock cut long and narrow to drill a hole in one end (screwed to the bottom piece edge), other end with a slot that goes over a hanger bolt (and knob) in the upper piece to make it adjustable.

Tip on setting the angle? I just go over to my miter saw and cut 2 wedges of the angle I want, put it (temporarily) on each side, between the pieces of the jig and adjust to that. That way I know each side of it is even.

Good starting angle? 15 degrees on a panel jig is the most "often" used profile for creating panels, whether cabinets or doors... That creates a cut 75 degrees from the face -- 15 degrees from the edge/opposing side. How did I get that? << 90 degrees - 15 degrees = 75 degrees >>.

How long will that profile be??? Well since you have the angle (15 degrees) and your depth of cut... you could dig back to try to remember Geometry to use formulas in SOHCAHTOA and the Pythagorean Theorem... but personally, I just take a piece of scrap, cut the profile, see it, measure it and adjust from there. For me, that's a whole lot faster than me having to figure out the math.

Either jig, depending on the reach of your router, you might have to use a bit extension to get to the height you need to be. That is much safer that thinking you can just slide the bit out of the seat of the collet to get a little more reach... like it looks like John's example was. ::scary::
***
Alternately, this could also be made on a Table Saw. Using the same type of jigs (and a dado) --or-- a TS Raised Panel Jig --or-- by doing an asymmetric cove cut for the profile using a cove fence and then a dado cut to create the lip.

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."

Last edited by MAFoElffen; 10-28-2012 at 02:30 PM.
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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-28-2012, 02:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JCJCJC View Post
I don't understand why you'd want to clamp it to the router table, since it will be pushing past the cutter. How you'll guide it consistently past the cutter will depend totally on your table and what sort of grooves, tracks or channels are in it - whatever is there will determine how you control the jig.
Hi John

I've built a few of these jigs over the years for use on spindle moulders (shapers). They are always fixed onto the bed of the machine, a Shaw guard (or feather board) is rigged up to apply downwards pressure over the cutter (it also acts as a guard) and the material is then fed past the cutter. the jig doesn't move.

Regards

Phil
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post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-28-2012, 02:56 PM
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You could always resort to your table saw....
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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-28-2012, 03:53 PM
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Default I've been doodling...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil P View Post
Hi John

I've built a few of these jigs over the years for use on spindle moulders (shapers). They are always fixed onto the bed of the machine, a Shaw guard (or feather board) is rigged up to apply downwards pressure over the cutter (it also acts as a guard) and the material is then fed past the cutter. the jig doesn't move.

Regards

Phil
Thanks Phil, that explains a lot to me. For the OP, I've been trying to think this through, see attached sketch which is indicative only, not to scale or anything, and I'm not brilliant at computer drawing. The red indicates where the hinge would be. Taking Phil's helpful advice fully on board, I would use laminated chipboard or some similar board with a plastic surface for the cutting deck and wax it so that the panel could slide easily.

Regards

John
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Last edited by JCJCJC; 10-28-2012 at 04:29 PM.
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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-29-2012, 05:42 PM Thread Starter
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You could always resort to your table saw....
Thanks but my Triton table saw won't allow me to angle the blade.
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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-29-2012, 05:47 PM Thread Starter
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MAFoElffen View Post
John-

On clamping the jig the OP is looking at... Because that one has legs/supports that would hit the bit if it moved. That jig is like a table extension, angling the table and having the bit through the table, so you slide the panel over the face of the jig as if it were the table..

From what you say, you seem to be used to the jig I'm used to which is an adjustable angle router jig (sled), which slides in the miter slot, the work extends over the lip of the sled over the bit at an angle and the work is clamped to the jig while it slides. You use piano hinge - I just use regular hinges.

Peter-

Both jigs would do you. The jig you asked about would do you if you have a small table on your router table and your panels were long. IMHO- The one we mentioned would also work and might be more worthwhile to you in the long run..
Thanks for the helpful reply. I'll reply in more detail on Tuesday.
Cheers.
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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-29-2012, 06:03 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JCJCJC View Post
Changing the angle ought to be straightforward enough. make the jig with a flat piece of MDF or plywood (as the original jig builder suggested) as a 'cutting deck' if I may call it that, but instead of fixing the edge at the pointy end, hinge it with two lengths of piano hinge, leaving a gap for the router cutter obviously. I would guess his jig's fixed angle was about 20 deg - you are not likely to be making a panel too far off that, maybe plus/minus 7 degrees or so? All you need do then is devise a solid clamping system to lock the cutting deck at your preferred angle - nuts and bolts, knobs, whatever you have.
I don't understand why you'd want to clamp it to the router table, since it will be pushing past the cutter. How you'll guide it consistently past the cutter will depend totally on your table and what sort of grooves, tracks or channels are in it - whatever is there will determine how you control the jig. Maybe...the original builder is just relying on the fence to keep it straight, notice that he has quite a long fence, and nothing seems to be running in the channels on the router table.

Here's his pic again for reference:



Have a go at it and refine as you learn - often I find the Mk II version of my jigs is when things begin to come right. Be careful not to have the router bit sticking up to an unsafe extent, or you'll end up with a custom bit to rout around corners like this one I invented:





John
Cheers, will get back to you in more detail on Tuesday.
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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-30-2012, 03:44 PM
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Thanks but my Triton table saw won't allow me to angle the blade.
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If one takes the time and trouble to correctly set-up the Triton 2000 Workcentre and saw. They are capable of producing very accurate results.


accurate at 90 deg anyway, eh!!!!
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