Spoon Carving Jig For Routers - Page 2 - Router Forums
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post #11 of 31 (permalink) Old 01-11-2014, 03:04 AM
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Well thought out, congratulations.

Ross,
Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia


Enjoy the knowledge of others that can be found within.

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post #12 of 31 (permalink) Old 01-11-2014, 08:02 AM
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Kelly, you have come very close to reinventing Bob Rosendahls odd shape routing jig. The twin support rails on each side can be made as templates for cutting table legs (or spoons) and the shape of the round overs attached to the router determine how fine a radius you can cut. Great job.
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post #13 of 31 (permalink) Old 01-11-2014, 09:32 AM
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Very impressive engineering!
I'm guessing the scooped guides are interchangeable, so that when you devise the guides for curved spoon sides, they can be quickly switched out?
Would a bowl bit work?

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post #14 of 31 (permalink) Old 01-11-2014, 07:43 PM Thread Starter
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I can't say I see the resemblance, but, I'm going to look into it for another idea to crank of my router capability.


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Originally Posted by Mike View Post
Kelly, you have come very close to reinventing Bob Rosendahls odd shape routing jig. The twin support rails on each side can be made as templates for cutting table legs (or spoons) and the shape of the round overs attached to the router determine how fine a radius you can cut. Great job.

The reason I have what you want is, I never lent it out before.

Scraps are a myth.
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post #15 of 31 (permalink) Old 01-11-2014, 07:54 PM Thread Starter
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You can put any bit you want in your router. You are limited only by your imagination and the shape of your guides.

As I mentioned, you could use strips of plastic cut from a five gallon bucket to wrap around, say, three oval shaped guides, to keep the bit within the lines.

You can start off by dropping a pre-cut spoon or ladle in place, or you can lock a rectangular piece of wood in place. One way, you do your scoop cut, then cut around the scoop with your band saw. The other might be easier than aligning the cut out spoon to make the scoop, but I found that to be not too difficult.

You could make guides and mount them on 1/8" stock and make it, for example, a couple inches longer than the guide. Drill a 3/8" hole on one end so it would drop over a 1/4"x20 bolt, mounted through the bottom of the base.

Just have a lip on the other end so the guide mount slides under it (say, 1/8"), then the mount would drop down over the 1/4" x 20 bolt and a jig knob would hold it in place (you'd only need three knobs and this would allow quick changes)

Hope that's somewhat clear.

Very impressive engineering!
I'm guessing the scooped guides are interchangeable, so that when you devise the guides for curved spoon sides, they can be quickly switched out?
Would a bowl bit work?

The reason I have what you want is, I never lent it out before.

Scraps are a myth.
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post #16 of 31 (permalink) Old 01-12-2014, 02:16 AM Thread Starter
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Default Still looking for Rosendahl's odd shape routing jig

I dug around on line an found books, but no information on the jig and its use or lay out. Any ideas where to go. I am not familiar with it and don't want to step on any toes.


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Originally Posted by Mike View Post
Kelly, you have come very close to reinventing Bob Rosendahls odd shape routing jig. The twin support rails on each side can be made as templates for cutting table legs (or spoons) and the shape of the round overs attached to the router determine how fine a radius you can cut. Great job.

The reason I have what you want is, I never lent it out before.

Scraps are a myth.
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post #17 of 31 (permalink) Old 01-12-2014, 11:30 AM
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Kelly, Bob Rosendahl is unparallelled in jig and fixture design. Bob and his son Rick produced the Router Workshop TV series that ran on PBS for 14 seasons. Bob's grandson Mark is the founder of routerforums. The Rosendahl family is no longer affiliated with the forums but Rick still runs Routerworkshop.net and sells subscriptions to the show.

Many of Bob's designs have been copied by MLCS, Rockler and others. I will see if I can dig up some better photos of the odd shape routing jig for you this week.

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post #18 of 31 (permalink) Old 01-12-2014, 11:58 AM Thread Starter
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I was without television for nearly decades. When I did have it, I didn't have access to channels of the fun stuff, such as the show you described. Even then, most of us "knew" there were more important things than routers, like table saws, band saws and so forth.

Of course, now I have about nine routers, and over-arm pin router, a Craftsman Router Crafter, a decent router table and drawers full of bits.

In honesty, and simple things aside, I never gave serious attention to jigs until the last few years. The first I tackled was a circle cutter for the band saw. After it, I was hooked because of how easy it made making dead-on circles.

I used to work for the feds, where my "career" of creating procedures and providing solutions to problems got its foot hold. The government bought many of my inventions and procedures, since they were above my pay grade. I'd been doing such for years, but took it for granted, until someone on the job pointed out they'd buy things like that.

Anyway, the point of it is, I have, literally, drawers full of designs and ideas ranging from the jig I posted to electronics devices.

With the internet, I'm slowly catching up. Meanwhile, I suspect I've reinvented the wheel more than once, since (I was drawing flat nosed vans around 59). Like Rosendahl, I had to come up with solutions and it's interesting to see how much people think alike, and differently, at the same time.

The reason I have what you want is, I never lent it out before.

Scraps are a myth.
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post #19 of 31 (permalink) Old 01-12-2014, 04:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dejure View Post
I dug around on line an found books, but no information on the jig and its use or lay out. Any ideas where to go. I am not familiar with it and don't want to step on any toes.
There is a book called Router Magic by Bill Hylton, that has more than 50 jigs. It is well laid out with plenty of pictures and plans. You can get it online from Amazon or Abe Books http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/Sear...&sts=t&x=0&y=0 for $10 or less plus shipping. It is a great book that should be on the bookshelf of any router enthusiast. Guaranteed to give you ideas and expand your routing capabilities.

Workmanship is not perfection; it is how well you can cover your mistakes.

Last edited by Daikusan; 01-12-2014 at 04:58 PM.
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post #20 of 31 (permalink) Old 01-13-2014, 08:59 AM
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Must have book. If you are new to routing and don't have it - get it
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