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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-03-2014, 01:13 PM Thread Starter
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Default Deck Post Router Jig

I am brand new to the forum and I hope I can get some good tips on how to handle my small project. I am in the process of completing my new deck and I want to make a 7" x 7" cedar railing post cap for all my posts. Each post is a real 6" x 6" post of rough cedar. Some are 5 7/8" and 5 3/4". All 30 posts are in place and I will be cutting them to the required height with a reciprocating saw. I do not want to see a gap between the post and the cap so I was thinking of routering a pocket in each post cap so the post fits in the cap. Maybe 0.50 - 0.75" deep? I need to make a jig or jigs for the different post dimensions. I have a router and a table but very little experience with routers. I'm not sure where to begin.

Thanks,

Mike
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-03-2014, 02:23 PM
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Mike , welcome to Router Forums, glad to have you join us, I'm positive the members of the community would be more than willing to answer any questions you have

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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-03-2014, 02:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MontrealMike View Post
I am brand new to the forum and I hope I can get some good tips on how to handle my small project. I am in the process of completing my new deck and I want to make a 7" x 7" cedar railing post cap for all my posts. Each post is a real 6" x 6" post of rough cedar. Some are 5 7/8" and 5 3/4". All 30 posts are in place and I will be cutting them to the required height with a reciprocating saw. I do not want to see a gap between the post and the cap so I was thinking of routering a pocket in each post cap so the post fits in the cap. Maybe 0.50 - 0.75" deep? I need to make a jig or jigs for the different post dimensions. I have a router and a table but very little experience with routers. I'm not sure where to begin.

Thanks,

Mike
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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-03-2014, 02:58 PM
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Welcome to the forum Mike. You unfortunately didn't fill out your profile so I don't know what other tools you have available or anything about your general woodworking experience. The easiest bit to use would be a pattern bit that would allow you to follow the sides of the jigs you make which would be 4 boards equal in length to the length of your post sides. The bad news is that you might need several size jigs. You could slot some holes for the screws that hold two sides down to give a little adjustment but you would only be able to adjust a little less than 1/2 the diameter of the guide bearing or it will dip into the gap at the ends of your guide boards. I wouldn't bother with going deeper than 1/4" unless you're really off with the saw.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-03-2014, 05:19 PM
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Hi Mike Welcome to the foum

As for jigs, not so sure you would want to, seeing you have so many
sizes in posts. It's my understanding that jigs are to save time. You're
going to spend the time you're going to save trying to make jigs for all
those sizes. But then, I'm not one who specializes in such things.

Good Luck on your deck-I've built a couple myself

Barb


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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-03-2014, 07:53 PM
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Welcome. Are you joining or just a one question guy?
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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-03-2014, 08:57 PM
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Welcome to the forum Mike.

Ross,
Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia


Enjoy the knowledge of others that can be found within.

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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-03-2014, 09:15 PM
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When I was working as a carpenter and later as a contractor here in the Northwest, that is a common styling for deck fittings.

If we pre-made them in the shop, we used a router table. Common sytles were either with a 45* or 30* champhor , endng up with 45* or 60* in relation to the top. If 6" posts, then we started out with 8" square stock 2-3" thick, so that was a good overhang around the posts. If On the posts, we usually dressed those up with V-Grooves.

If we did them on-site, then we did it on a table saw.

You could dress it up with copper caps. But even though we only have 52 days average that is doesn't rain here, if you do it that way and seal it, the cedar around here ages well and is fairly weather worthy. We still seal it though.

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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-04-2014, 07:28 AM
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Default If you're set on wood....

why not cut the top to the right size (left image), place on top of post and draw outline of post on top piece (middle image) then double sided tape top to bench and double sided tape four lengths of 18mm wood around the pencil line butting each one up to the next (one size fits all). Rout the centre out then remove the template wood to use on the next one. Write a reference on both post a top so you know which one goes where afterwards.
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-04-2014, 11:39 AM
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Originally Posted by vindaloo View Post
why not cut the top to the right size (left image), place on top of post and draw outline of post on top piece (middle image) then double sided tape top to bench and double sided tape four lengths of 18mm wood around the pencil line butting each one up to the next (one size fits all). Rout the centre out then remove the template wood to use on the next one. Write a reference on both post a top so you know which one goes where afterwards.
+1. This seems like a simple and practical solution.

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