An experimental conga drum - Page 2 - Router Forums
 45Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #11 of 105 (permalink) Old 12-31-2015, 08:46 AM
Marine Engineer
 
kp91's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Country: United States
First Name: Doug
Posts: 4,741
 
Default

I could turn this on my ornamental mill. There are several home built ornamental mill designs you could adapt to your project. If you take the example link below and make the sides of the box match your desired curve it should work.

Homemade Router Lathe


Oh, and use a large core box bit for turning
Herb Stoops and cocobolo1 like this.

Doug
1 John 1:9
Fredericksburg, VA




http://disasterreliefeffort.org/

Last edited by kp91; 12-31-2015 at 09:06 AM.
kp91 is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 105 (permalink) Old 12-31-2015, 09:28 AM
Registered User
 
TenGees's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Country: Canada
First Name: Paul
Posts: 1,794
 
Default

Yup, maybe something like in the pic but with curved rails and much bigger. On curved rails the router base would rock, so you might have to have the leading and trailing ends of the base raised higher than the center. Maybe metal rods, wheels or pulleys would make for easier movement.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	example.jpg
Views:	254
Size:	73.4 KB
ID:	176074  

Murtu01, Herb Stoops and cocobolo1 like this.
TenGees is offline  
post #13 of 105 (permalink) Old 12-31-2015, 11:06 AM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 16,210
 
Default

Hi Keith. I'm sorry I missed your intro yesterday. I'm your closest neighbor, although you aren't the first to register from that area. Are you closer to Salmon Arm or Sycamous?

That assembly could be turned on a lathe if the bed depth was deep enough but most of the hobbyist ones only have a 12" swing so that leaves that out. As Paul just showed it's easy to turn a cylinder with a router sled. I think you could make one like he suggests with rails that match the curve on the drum and it will still work but I'm not sure how smooth you will get it since it will be hard to keep the router vertical to the cut and the corners of the bit may did in at times.

Since you have a Lancelot disc for your grinder I would use it to rough out the shape and then I would use a plane or spoke shave to smooth it. In fact I might be inclined to just do the whole drum by hand and it might be faster than the router lathe.
cocobolo1 likes this.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #14 of 105 (permalink) Old 12-31-2015, 11:14 AM
Registered User
 
walowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Michael
Posts: 220
 
Default

I have made several segmented drum hoops of all sizes. I use 40 or 60 grit sanding discs on an angle grinder, then ROS for the finish sanding.
Murtu01 and cocobolo1 like this.
walowan is offline  
post #15 of 105 (permalink) Old 12-31-2015, 12:49 PM
Registered User
 
DaninVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Canada
First Name: Dan
Posts: 15,204
 
Default

I'm still going with the piece of art p.o.v.
I was also wondering about the internal shape? It must be pretty uneven(?).
DaninVan is online now  
post #16 of 105 (permalink) Old 12-31-2015, 03:26 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Country: Canada
First Name: Keith
Posts: 1,151
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by neville9999 View Post
The only way I see is that you need to make a frame that it would spin in, you would need end plates on the drum to hold each end centrally and a post at each end to support it and I would turn the drum by hand, the post needs bearings at each end for the spin, looking at the photo then it looks like the high point to the low point is over an inch but under two inches, that could have been reduced if there were more segments in each ring, either way that is too much to cut away in one pass, as the rotation would be slow then each pass could not have a deeper cut than a 1/4 inch and a 1/4 inch along the arch, that could be OK if the rotation was slow at the start the cut would be stop/start until it was round, I would make an arch that was attached to the top of each post and the arch would have to be the shape you want the router to cut the drum to and you need to be able to lower the arch at each end to get a deeper cut, the router would travel on a sled along the arch. one rotation at a time, do one full rotation before the router sled moved along the arch to do the next circular cut, I would use a planing cutter with a flat bottom and the bottom of the cutter will have to be held square with the cut, as the difference between the high and the low points is so much then you will have to do many rotations to get the drum finished, I would do the final pass as only an 1/8th of an inch, this can be done but you will need a big Router lathe, see my Router Lathe post for what the beam and posts needs to look like, I am making mine so well as I will keep it for years and years and use it for many items but you lathe does have to be strong to support the arch/sled but I would only make it as well as you need it to be so how many drums will you make? what you need to build is not that different to what I am making, my lathe has a flat top, yours will have a pair of arched top rails that the Router Sled will move along. best of luck. N

http://www.routerforums.com/jigs-fix...ter-lathe.html
G'day Neville. You are the one who is entirely to blame for me joining this forum. When I did my searches on Mr. Google, your thread on your current lathe building project came up. Have you not received the metal parts yet that you are waiting for? Lots of us are awaiting the final completion of your lathe.

I'm surprised that a man of your considerable talent does not weld. It's actually pretty easy with oxy-acetylene, and you can even do stainless steel with gas. I know that most people think you need to use tig, but gas works especially if you have one of the Dillon Mk.111 welders.

Now, as far as the number of pieces in each segment goes, I do realize that more pieces in each layer would work much better. I will work out the lengths for 12 pieces per layer to see what the difference would be. It currently uses just eight per layer.

That would bump the glue-up to 540 pieces...not sure that I want to do that.

Now, as far as the actual shape of the router lathe goes, I already made up a laminated piece to the shape that I wanted. I would need to make up two wider pieces with exactly the same shape in order to let the router be guided to the proper profile.

I think I can solve the tipping problem by using arborite to keep the router on an even keel. Actually make a piece which would fit under the router base and on to the top of the two laminated sections and stick a narrow strip of arboreta under the ends.

I have built telescopes in the past, and we use a similar system to allow the 'scopes to pivot on. Almost no drag doing that, so it should make for an easy slide. I'll give that some more thought to improve upon the basic idea before I start on the actual construction.

I think it is entirely unfair that you have such gorgeous weather down your way while we are just now getting to be buried in our usual winter snow.

Thank you for your insight Neville, I'm sure we will be conversing much more in the future.
cocobolo1 is offline  
post #17 of 105 (permalink) Old 12-31-2015, 03:31 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Country: Canada
First Name: Keith
Posts: 1,151
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gmercer_48083 View Post
Keith,
I agree with Neville in that you would have to make a frame similar to a lathe so it could be rotated slowly by hand, either by crank or a wheel attached the end. My first thought was to attach the frame so it could be hung as a pendulum over a tablesaw to rough it to shape by spinning and swinging, but that would take some serious stabilizing. If you started with a frame that it could rotate on, and made a curved pair of rails for a router to follow, then when it's roughed down you might be able to adapt the curved rails to hold a belt sander or disk sander to further refine the finish. Nice challenge!
I'm with you here, but I wouldn't entertain the tablesaw idea. I think that would be too risky.

I never even thought about adding some sort of sander to the rig as well, but that sounds like a capital suggestion. Of course, first I will have to go with the router setup.
cocobolo1 is offline  
post #18 of 105 (permalink) Old 12-31-2015, 03:36 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Country: Canada
First Name: Keith
Posts: 1,151
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kp91 View Post
I could turn this on my ornamental mill. There are several home built ornamental mill designs you could adapt to your project. If you take the example link below and make the sides of the box match your desired curve it should work.

Homemade Router Lathe


Oh, and use a large core box bit for turning
The only ornamental lathe I have ever seen is a Holtzapfel (sp?) lathe. Quite the rig I must say.

I have about 100 or so router bits here, pretty sure I can find something suitable. Not sure I have a BIG core box bit, but I do have a smaller one for sure.
cocobolo1 is offline  
post #19 of 105 (permalink) Old 12-31-2015, 03:43 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Country: Canada
First Name: Keith
Posts: 1,151
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TenGees View Post
Yup, maybe something like in the pic but with curved rails and much bigger. On curved rails the router base would rock, so you might have to have the leading and trailing ends of the base raised higher than the center. Maybe metal rods, wheels or pulleys would make for easier movement.
Hi Paul...another crazy Canuck I see!

Thanks for the photo, nice setup.

Giving a little more thought to the router base, I could actually laminate some wood to the exact shape - or very close anyway - and then add a strip of arborite to the ends to make it slide easily. As mentioned in my earlier post, we use something similar to pivot telescopes on and it works well.

Providing the curve is constant, that would work fine. The curve of the drum may straighten out somewhat at the lower end, which would mean I would need to have only the leading/trailing ends in contact with the rails.
cocobolo1 is offline  
post #20 of 105 (permalink) Old 12-31-2015, 03:46 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Country: Canada
First Name: Keith
Posts: 1,151
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
Hi Keith. I'm sorry I missed your intro yesterday. I'm your closest neighbor, although you aren't the first to register from that area. Are you closer to Salmon Arm or Sycamous?

That assembly could be turned on a lathe if the bed depth was deep enough but most of the hobbyist ones only have a 12" swing so that leaves that out. As Paul just showed it's easy to turn a cylinder with a router sled. I think you could make one like he suggests with rails that match the curve on the drum and it will still work but I'm not sure how smooth you will get it since it will be hard to keep the router vertical to the cut and the corners of the bit may did in at times.

Since you have a Lancelot disc for your grinder I would use it to rough out the shape and then I would use a plane or spoke shave to smooth it. In fact I might be inclined to just do the whole drum by hand and it might be faster than the router lathe.
Hi Chuck, we are 80 kms from Salmon Arm by road, more like 20 k's as the crow flies.

Utilizing all the ideas here, I think the problems of proper shape, digging in, etc. are solving themselves. Keeping the router square to the work should actually be quite simple.
cocobolo1 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
question about V Drum Sander size Tom in indy Tools and Woodworking 3 03-09-2014 04:15 PM
sanding drum stem chessnut2 Tools and Woodworking 18 05-06-2013 07:33 AM
Build Mobile base for a drum sander RickPr Tools and Woodworking 10 01-12-2013 09:15 AM
Drum rounding help needed jontheodore Jigs and Fixtures 8 08-15-2008 10:39 PM
Drum sander help please? Birch Tools and Woodworking 6 04-19-2007 03:57 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome