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kp91 04-15-2017 04:11 PM

Dog paw bowls, many mistakes, or how I made a new friend
 
6 Attachment(s)
I was trying to come up with a project to play with the wood table tops I recently acquired. I had purchased a plan for dog paw shaped bowls last year, but didn't have any stock on hand that thick. It was designed for 1.5 inch stock, mine was just shy of 1.75 inch. I scaled the file to fit on the piece of counter I had planed, and rotated and flipped patterns to get 4 on one blank.

I tried to figure out the best way to hold the blank down, and decided to hot glue it to the sacrificial table. This held surprisingly well. I used 1 stick of glue, and when I removed the blank it just tore the tiniest bit of paper off of the MDF.

The rough pocketing tool path was run, and it was exciting to see the paws to appear from the board. I was also excited that so far, no errors!

The project called for a 1 inch bowl and tray bit, which I was sure I had. Nope. I have a 1.25 inch bowl and tray bit. The bit geometry wasn't going to work with the size of the pockets being cut, so a trip to the store was in order. Nothing local, so drive north an hour to Woodcraft. They don't have a 1 inch either, but they had a 3/4 which I could make work.

(In the 5 minutes I was in the store, a nice young lady backed up within a whisker of my tailgate, I guess those sensors on the back of her car don't see above the bumper. Fortunately she didn't hit me! That would have made for one very expensive router bit.)

I chuck the bit up in the router, recalculate the tool path for the smaller diameter and ran the program. The first pass went fine, but on the second pass the router was screaming. I manually dropped the feed rate of the router until it sounded happier, and waited forever for it to finish. During that time I realized that I had left too big of an allowance on the roughing tool path, because I was expecting to use a larger bit. That poor bowl and tray bit was trying to hog out almost 1/2 of it's diameter. Fortunately, I didn't break the bit, or burn the wood.

The finish pocket tool path flew by, and I was beginning to feel really good about the project. I chucked the end mill in to cut the parts out, fired up the tool and watched the first few passes of the cut out and it looked great. That is when the universe conspired against me! I step inside for a quick trip to the head, and heard the next pass start, a funny rattle, then it got a lot quieter. I ran back out to the garage and found the end mill had come out of the router. It looks like it had tried to burrow into the wood, as it had drilled a hole in the bottom of the blank. I hit the emergency stop and assessed the damage. The machine, router, and bit were all in good shape.

Fortunately it only destroyed one of the parts, but now I had a bigger problem. By hitting the emergency stop I now had lost registration with the original x,y zero. I stepped through the program until I could line up the router with the blank and re-zero everything. I was able to get very close, and ran the program to see if it would follow the original groove, which it did pretty perfectly.

This is when I decided that if I was going to leave the machine even for a second, I was going to have to hire somebody to watch it for me. Fortunately I found a little fellow at WalMart who agreed to do that for only $30 on clearance. Stuart stands on the computer cabinet and keeps an eye on everything for me. I can watch him either on the phone or on my PC.

I cleaned the bit and collet, clamped it back into the router and ran the remaining cut. I knew my bit wasn't long enough to cut the piece all the way out, so I took it to the bandsaw and cut them free. I used the ruined piece to practice my roundover setup, and when I was happy with the result I was able to clean up the other 3.

The piece still needs sanding and finish, but my bride has already posted it on Instagram, and someone already has expressed interest in one of them. If I am going to make more of these, I will definitely have to work on optimizing the work so it doesn't take so long to mill.

Lot of work, a lot of challenges, but learned a lot. And I have a new, little yellow buddy in the shop with me. I haven't decided how I am going to mount Stuart just yet, wheter he stays on the computer cabinet, if he gets mounted to the gantry, or if I mount him up high to get a full view of the table. He takes an HD image, and you can zoom in and see quite a bit of detail. When I use the phone there is a 1 second delay, when I use the browser window it is 2 seconds. Still enough time to prevent a mistake from turning into a disaster.

difalkner 04-16-2017 07:50 AM

Nice little project, Doug! Glad your vehicle wasn't damaged, too. I like your new buddy, may have to check into that myself.

David

Cherryville Chuck 04-16-2017 12:54 PM

Those are neat Doug. A question about the process. Couldn't you hog out most of the waste with a forstner and then set the z axis accordingly and adjust the tool path for the shallower cut?

JOAT 04-16-2017 04:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kp91 (Post 1534218)
Nothing local, so drive north an hour to Woodcraft. They don't have a 1 inch either, but they had a 3/4 which I could make work.

(In the 5 minutes I was in the store, a nice young lady backed up within a whisker of my tailgate, I guess those sensors on the back of her car don't see above the bumper. Fortunately she didn't hit me! That would have made for one very expensive router bit.)

I step inside for a quick trip to the head, and heard the next pass start, a funny rattle, then it got a lot quieter.

Pretty slick bowls. And some lessons learned.

Always call before you take a trip like that. See if they have what you want, or at least something else you can use. If they do not, then start calling in your local area, surprising at times what you can buy locally that way. And if a store/shop does not have what you want/need, ALWAYS ask if they know someone else who might have it, and get at least a name, and preferably a phone number. Repeat as needed.

Got rearended at a stoplight one time. Young girl let her foot off the brake. Had a pickup with a great big steel step bumper. Couldn't even see where she hit me. But the front of her car was a bit of a mess. Hehehe

Never, ever, leave a foolproof tool running without being there. If something can go wrong, it usually will. Next time keep a jug handy. >:)

kp91 04-16-2017 06:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck (Post 1534906)
Those are neat Doug. A question about the process. Couldn't you hog out most of the waste with a forstner and then set the z axis accordingly and adjust the tool path for the shallower cut?

When I set this project up I ran it as 4 tool paths, using 2 tools. The first tool path was the roughing cut , which hogged out the majority of the waste using a straight bit. I set it up to leave an allowance, so it would clear most of the wood away, but leave a little for the bowl and tray bit to clean up and the allowance for the radius at the corner of the bowl and tray bit.

The bowl and tray bit would then do a finish cut on the sidewalls of pocket and establish the radius at the bottom.

The third tool path was a clean up of 0.02" on the bottom of the pockets with the bowl bit

The last tool path was the outside profile which was the one that went wrong.

If I was hand routing this with a template, I would have used a Forstner bit to clear out a bunch of the waste.

MEBCWD 04-16-2017 08:05 PM

Doug couldn't have you used the 1 1/2" bowl bit? The radii look like thye would have been large enough unless that bowl is really small. Nice project by the way!

RainMan 2.0 04-16-2017 08:47 PM

Cool project Doug , as those look really neat . Doug , do you park with your tailgate open , or did you have no choice ?
That's what I call to close for comfort :fie:

kp91 04-16-2017 10:06 PM

I have a bunch of steel in the bed that you can barely see hanging onto the tailgate, usually I don't leave it down. I made sure I was all the way through and over the line on 'my side' when I parked, but I get the feeling a lot of folks rely very heavily on the backup sensors on their cars. My truck is just shy of 15 years old, so it doesn't have any of that 'newfangled, fancy stuff'.

Cherryville Chuck 04-16-2017 10:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kp91 (Post 1535242)
I have a bunch of steel in the bed that you can barely see hanging onto the tailgate, usually I don't leave it down. I made sure I was all the way through and over the line on 'my side' when I parked, but I get the feeling a lot of folks rely very heavily on the backup sensors on their cars. My truck is just shy of 15 years old, so it doesn't have any of that 'newfangled, fancy stuff'.

I've heard that there have been more backing up incidents with cars that have cameras and sensors than there were before them. I've also noticed lots of drivers who have no clue what a mirror is for.

vchiarelli 04-17-2017 06:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck (Post 1535282)
I've also noticed lots of drivers who have no clue what a mirror is for.

Or a turn signal


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