Not woodworking, Diesel Engine No. 1 - Router Forums
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 01:52 PM Thread Starter
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Default Not woodworking, Diesel Engine No. 1

Talk about Old Iron

I was on the road again last week, had to take another class at an engine maker's school in Copenhagen. While there we snuck in a special tour of Diesel House, always a fun experience.

They weren't able to run the BIG engine, but they did run Burmeister & Wain engine No. 1, the very first commercial Diesel they made in 1904.

The cellphone video isn't the best, but I hope you enjoy it.



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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 08:15 PM
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That’s quite the piece of engineering for 115 years ago.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 09:40 PM
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Really interesting how the size of things back then were huge but the power output was low. Man, has that changed. On a recent trip I got to look as some steam power equipment from about 125-135 years ago. Holy cow, was that stuff rough and crude. Mostly farm implements. Today we have engines producing close to one hp per pound.
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 09:48 PM Thread Starter
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Really interesting how the size of things back then were huge but the power output was low. Man, has that changed. On a recent trip I got to look as some steam power equipment from about 125-135 years ago. Holy cow, was that stuff rough and crude. Mostly farm implements. Today we have engines producing close to one hp per pound.
The class I was taking was for a newer style of engine. It's not the latest, but miles ahead of what I have been working on recently. They now control these massive ship engines electronically, getting rid of mechanical running gear which allows them to vary fuel injection timing, cylinder compression and lubrication constantly to burn less and less fuel for emissions sake. The firing pressures are 30+ bar higher allowing them to squeeze more HP out of the same fuel, burning a lot less.

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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-13-2019, 01:13 AM
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Coach builder, used wood, close enough to woodworking for me. Very cool. Always enjoyable to visit a museum like that. My older son recently completed a certification course for A/C and he was close enough to the Harley Museum to tour it. And took pictures, and brought back a booklet on the history. If it ain't a Harley, it ain't a motorcycle. And if you have to have Harley explained to you, you won't understand anyway. Post pictures of the museum if you have some.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-13-2019, 08:29 AM
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You have to love the progression of technology. I've seen some of that "rough" farm equipment and a mill a friend's farther had in one of his barns. The size of those leather drive belts were massive. The real wonder is that there are some of these are still in use and people that know how to use and repair them. Every year at the Virginia State Fair there is a display of steam equipment and this year they had an ice cream making operation run by John Deere steam equipment. That's one good way to get my attention.....
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-13-2019, 08:51 AM
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What a piece of engineering, how they made the flywheel intrigues me.

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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-13-2019, 09:07 AM
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What a piece of engineering, how they made the flywheel intrigues me.
And it needed to be well balanced which is another engineering feat Id like to hear about.

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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-13-2019, 09:52 PM
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This past week I traveled through about 1/3 of Northern Ontario my first rounds to all the sawmills. It was a big week and lots of Kilometers or miles and I look forward to doing the other 2/3 soon. During my travels I noticed several remote towns payed homage to the railroads that helped put them on the maps. I saw at least 3 beautiful old steam locomotives permanently parked and on display. This Diesel engine reminded me of those locomotives, they sure are eye candy.

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