An interesting albeit expensive site for manuals - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-10-2009, 12:41 AM Thread Starter
RouterForums.com User
 
harrysin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Country: Australia
First Name: Harry
Posts: 14,812
     
Send a message via Skype™ to harrysin
Default An interesting albeit expensive site for manuals

This is a site that sells "missing manuals" for popular software. They are allegedly written in understandable English but are rather pricey.

http://missingmanuals.com/library.html

Harry



Nothing but heaven itself is better than a friend who is really a friend. - Plautus






harrysin is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-10-2009, 04:34 AM
Forum Contributor
 
xplorx4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Country: United States
First Name: Jerry
Posts: 10,671
 
Default

When it comes to software, for me, there is no such thing as an "understandable manual!! My oldest son is, and I mean is, a computer genius. His present computer is so overclocked that he has the main processor and Video card processor liquid cooled. as a mater of fact I will be building him a "box" to hold the three radiators he just got.

Wisdom: Where experience and knowledge combine and become one.

"We are all one decision away from Stupid!!"

Lamentations 3:22-23

"How often we sacrifice the permanent plans of God on the altar of immediate solutions"

I have a very good memory, just short is all.

Last edited by xplorx4; 02-18-2009 at 06:08 AM.
xplorx4 is offline  
post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-10-2009, 06:43 AM Thread Starter
RouterForums.com User
 
harrysin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Country: Australia
First Name: Harry
Posts: 14,812
     
Send a message via Skype™ to harrysin
Default

"that he has the main processor and Video card processor liquid cooled."

Doesn't he know that liquids and printed circuit boards don't mix? Only joking of course.

Harry



Nothing but heaven itself is better than a friend who is really a friend. - Plautus






harrysin is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-10-2009, 01:35 PM
Registered User
 
Ralph Barker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Country: United States
First Name: Ralph
Posts: 2,001
 
Default

In your search for missing manuals, Harry, did you happen to run across one that has all the missing socks from the drier?

- Ralph
Ralph Barker is offline  
post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-15-2009, 12:57 AM Thread Starter
RouterForums.com User
 
harrysin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Country: Australia
First Name: Harry
Posts: 14,812
     
Send a message via Skype™ to harrysin
Default

Ah Ralph, that's a mystery that doesn't seem to have an answer.

Harry



Nothing but heaven itself is better than a friend who is really a friend. - Plautus






harrysin is offline  
post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-15-2009, 07:51 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Country: United States
First Name: Johann
Posts: 19
 
Default

Harry,

I like to build clocks and have been studying your posts regarding your French balloon clocks and have a few questions:

1. Do you have a problem going against the grain when you rout the body of the clock? In other words, do you just go from left to right throughout the complete length of the template? How much clean-up do you need to do after routing the body?

2. What bit do you recommend using to rout the body and opening for the movement? Would a regular straight bit work?

3. I saw where you used the scroll saw to separate the clock body from the waste at the 1/8" lip. How did you smooth the 1/8" edges and make them have a consistent reveal around the edges?

4. I noted that you recommended flipping the template and timber when routing the movement opening in the back half of the body. Do you also flip the template when making the back half of the body?

5. In general, what are the approximate dimensions of your clocks? I realize that the dimensions are, in the end, determined by the diameter of the dial, but am curious what size clocks you chose.

I think that is it for now. When the weather clears, I'm going to take a shot at making one of the clocks. It should be interesting; I have never done template routing.

Also, thanks for your contributions to this forum; your comments are very much appreciated. You obviously have a wealth of experience and expertise.

Thanks in advance for your reply.

John
Johann George is offline  
post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-16-2009, 06:27 AM Thread Starter
RouterForums.com User
 
harrysin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Country: Australia
First Name: Harry
Posts: 14,812
     
Send a message via Skype™ to harrysin
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johann George View Post
Harry,

I like to build clocks and have been studying your posts regarding your French balloon clocks and have a few questions:

1. Do you have a problem going against the grain when you rout the body of the clock? In other words, do you just go from left to right throughout the complete length of the template? How much clean-up do you need to do after routing the body?

2. What bit do you recommend using to rout the body and opening for the movement? Would a regular straight bit work?

3. I saw where you used the scroll saw to separate the clock body from the waste at the 1/8" lip. How did you smooth the 1/8" edges and make them have a consistent reveal around the edges?

4. I noted that you recommended flipping the template and timber when routing the movement opening in the back half of the body. Do you also flip the template when making the back half of the body?

5. In general, what are the approximate dimensions of your clocks? I realize that the dimensions are, in the end, determined by the diameter of the dial, but am curious what size clocks you chose.

I think that is it for now. When the weather clears, I'm going to take a shot at making one of the clocks. It should be interesting; I have never done template routing.

Also, thanks for your contributions to this forum; your comments are very much appreciated. You obviously have a wealth of experience and expertise.

Thanks in advance for your reply.

John
I'll attempt to answer your questions John in the order asked.

1.Because the outside shape is being plunge routed, there is no breakout, I keep going taking cuts of around 3mm. There really is very little sanding to do, the surface from a sharp cutter is very smooth.
2.For the body shape and clock opening I use a straight plunge cutter, that is one with an extra cutter at the bottom so that it cuts during the plunge rather than burn it's way down.
3.Here are a couple of shots that make this clear, there well may be a suitable size bearing available but at the time of the first clock I wanted it there and then!
4.Whenever the wood is flipped, so must the template because there are bound to be small inaccuracies in making the templates.
5.The biggest one uses a 150mm dia. clock and the height, not including the feet or finial, but incl. the pediment is 400mm and 110mm front to back, the head is 180mm.
The smallest uses a 90mm clock and the height, not incl. the feet or finial but incl. the pediment is 270mm and 70mm front to back, the head is 120mm dia.

All that is left now is for us to wait for your photo shoot John, don't hesitate to ask if you have further questions.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	rim-cutter1.jpg
Views:	44
Size:	21.8 KB
ID:	20139  

Click image for larger version

Name:	Rim-cutter2.jpg
Views:	37
Size:	13.3 KB
ID:	20140  


Harry



Nothing but heaven itself is better than a friend who is really a friend. - Plautus






harrysin is offline  
post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-16-2009, 06:15 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Country: United States
First Name: Johann
Posts: 19
 
Default

Harry,

Thanks for the prompt response. I appreciate your help.

John
Johann George is offline  
post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-18-2009, 05:52 AM
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 16
 
Default

Hello Harry

I must say your link is very useful and i never see such a post on any forum, thanks a lot
Jennabutala is offline  
post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-18-2009, 06:01 AM
Registered User
 
allthunbs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Country: Canada
First Name: Ron
Posts: 2,881
 
Default

Hi Harry: Are you using a spiral bit or a straight cutting bit? Upspiral or downspiral?
allthunbs is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
An interesting site harrysin Lobby 7 10-28-2008 04:41 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome