If you were growing trees, what kind would you grow? - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-05-2009, 02:24 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 11
 
Default If you were growing trees, what kind would you grow?

I'm looking at buying a new place, and one of the locations is on 6 acres out away from the city (and out of city limits). I was thinking that planting some faster growing trees for timber on a couple of the acres would be kind of cool. Obviously it would be a number of years down the road before they would be usable. I hear there are some pretty fast growers available now so 5 years down the road is not a crazy thought. As I am a reasonably young guy, I should get at least a little use out of them =)

I know this is not specifically a router question, but more of a what if for router lovers. If you were going to plant a few acres of trees to use, what kind would you pick?

Jeremy
Jeremiah is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-05-2009, 02:26 PM
Registered User
 
dovetail_65's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Country: United States
First Name: Dovetail
Posts: 1,616
 
Default

The traditional Maple, Oak and Walnut would be nice for me. You would need more than 5 years though!
dovetail_65 is offline  
post #3 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-05-2009, 02:36 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 258
 
Default

Jeremy, as a fellow Washingtonian, the obvious choice for building would be Douglas fir, followed by hemlock and cedar. For a quick cash crop, you could try cottonwood or perhaps alder (which is more in demand than fir at the present time). A good wood for furniture is alder and big leaf maple. These are all native to the pacific NW and should do well for you without a lot of extra care.
a1tomo is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-05-2009, 02:44 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 258
 
Default

As afurther note, if you have too many trees and not enough sunlight, your roof turns green!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	2003 003.JPG
Views:	76
Size:	58.8 KB
ID:	20945  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2004 021.jpg
Views:	63
Size:	145.3 KB
ID:	20946  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2005 008.jpg
Views:	64
Size:	140.9 KB
ID:	20947  

a1tomo is offline  
post #5 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-05-2009, 02:49 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Country: United States
First Name: Bj
Posts: 23,786
       
Default

Hi Jeremiah

That would be nice but I don't think you will around to cut them down, hardwoods take a VERY ,VERY long time to grow that's if you want to get more than a 2 x 4 out of them..

Then Once you cut it down then you need to mill/saw it up..

Not to say anything about air drying it out for two years or so.. and a dry out shed to keep it dry in that time..



============
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremiah View Post
I'm looking at buying a new place, and one of the locations is on 6 acres out away from the city (and out of city limits). I was thinking that planting some faster growing trees for timber on a couple of the acres would be kind of cool. Obviously it would be a number of years down the road before they would be usable. I hear there are some pretty fast growers available now so 5 years down the road is not a crazy thought. As I am a reasonably young guy, I should get at least a little use out of them =)

I know this is not specifically a router question, but more of a what if for router lovers. If you were going to plant a few acres of trees to use, what kind would you pick?

Jeremy



"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"

Marc Sommerfeld Tools ,Videos
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT-n...RWaEpMA/videos

Find all threads started by bobj3
http://www.routerforums.com/search.php?searchid=944097



Last edited by bobj3; 03-05-2009 at 04:33 PM.
bobj3 is offline  
post #6 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-05-2009, 03:12 PM
Registered User
 
dovetail_65's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Country: United States
First Name: Dovetail
Posts: 1,616
 
Default

I think Lyptus may work from what I understand they grow in 10 to 20 years to a nice size.

Even if you plant them it still would be neat for your kids or even their kids to be able to one day take down a tree you planted!

My mother in law has property here where her family planted trees from 1830 -1835 and there is Oak and Walnut. The trees are HUGE.

Someday I hope to fell one of each and use the wood for inlays to give to every head of the family.

Last edited by dovetail_65; 03-05-2009 at 03:14 PM.
dovetail_65 is offline  
post #7 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-05-2009, 03:13 PM
Forum Contributor
 
xplorx4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Country: United States
First Name: Jerry
Posts: 10,671
 
Default

Even if you just wanted to grow pine for pulpwood, (paper and such), I think you might be hard pressed to find someone to harvest the wood.

I planted several trees around my house the year we moved in and the elm has doubled its height, the maple has too the Colorado blue spruce gains no more then 6" in a good year. We live in Georgia and planted in 2003, so it will be 6 years to see the above results.

We do have Pine that grows like a weed and but most people here feel that that is what they are. Personally I like them. I have seen this pine grow a couple feet in one year but 5 years is only 10 feet.

Wisdom: Where experience and knowledge combine and become one.

"We are all one decision away from Stupid!!"

Lamentations 3:22-23

"How often we sacrifice the permanent plans of God on the altar of immediate solutions"

I have a very good memory, just short is all.
xplorx4 is offline  
post #8 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-05-2009, 04:08 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 258
 
Default

Of course you guys are all correct! If you want something that grows fast, plant kids or weeds. A forest takes a whole lot of time!
a1tomo is offline  
post #9 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-05-2009, 04:24 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 11
 
Default

There are some varieties of trees that surprised me with how fast they are supposed to grow. Hybrid Poplars, Paulownia Tree (some kind of chinese hardwood) and even an oak tree called Nutall oak. They range from 8-10 feet of growth a year, except for that Paulownia tree which is a crazy 10-15 feet a year. This is just from reading I haven't actually grown any of them at this point.

But there are a lot of fast growth trees and hybrid trees listed as good for timber production. I know if I plant a regular hardwood tree I will be buried under it before its ready. I'm doing a little looking around to see what there is that can be grown in my part of the country. That Nutall oak looks neat, but I think its more of a southern plant, being that it comes from the banks of the Mississippi river.

So yep, I'm not too proud to use pine or poplar, I just thought it would be a fine thing to see something made from seed all the way to a chair or something like that. Your yard looks like a great place to relax a1tomo by the way.

Jeremy
Jeremiah is offline  
post #10 of 38 (permalink) Old 03-05-2009, 04:54 PM
Registered User
 
levon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Country: United States
First Name: levon
Posts: 1,820
 
Default

i would say that if you want hardwood, not the weird looking trees with the big funny looking leaves, you are wasting your time. if you plant oak, it will take at least 50 years or more to get any wood out of it. i would plant pine and it grows fast! i would then sell it and use the money i got for my hardwood projects. Jerry was talking about a few trees and he lives in Atlanta. if you plant an amount of trees that is worth harvesting, it will pay big dividends. it has to be enough to be profitable for the harvester.in south georgia, pine timber is big business. to someone who doesnt have an agricultural background , they are guessing. no disrespect to anyone, but you have to understand timber.
i know nothing about maple or alder, but i do know that red oak takes a lifetime to see lumber from.

just an opinion from this part of the country.

ps, the beautiful appearance of a hardwood is due to the close knit grain it provides. if it grew faster the grain will be more like a new growth pine. i do love oak, but know it is a waste of time to try and grow it.

light travels faster than sound, this is why some people seem bright til you hear them speak.

Please Please Please edit your profile with a name and location so we can better assist you and make for a friendlier forum

levon

Last edited by levon; 03-05-2009 at 05:13 PM.
levon is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome