THIS is a crankshaft - Router Forums
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 06:56 AM Thread Starter
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Default THIS is a crankshaft

I'm fascinated by such brilliant engineering.
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 08:39 AM
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I would love to see how they cast that!
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 08:45 AM
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Those are quite amazing! Looks like a crankshaft for one of those big cargo ships. The engines for them will run on nearly anything combustible. They also have explosive bolts that attach the pistons. That way if something happens to one, they blow the bolts and take that cylinder out of service until they get to port.
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 09:03 AM Thread Starter
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I would love to see how they cast that!
When at high school in about 1948 we visited Crossley's Engineering in Manchester England where we saw crankshafts about half that size being made, from the casting shop to the hammer press then on to the lathe. Red hot turnings that looked like very thick gramophone springs were the norm. What intrigued me most was the HUGE machine that drilled the tiny holes in the injectors, I've long since forgotten how many twist drills made all the holes in one go, some turned clockwise and others turned ant-clockwise.

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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 09:46 AM
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A long time ago, I worked for Kawasaki's motorcycle division, it was a gnat on the ass of the elephant that company was. Their heavy industries division made ships engines. At the time their hq was in Kawasaki, a city in Japan. Their level of technology then was amazing, I can only imagine the automated machinery they have to make things like this.

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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 01:12 PM
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I would love to see how they cast that!
I want to see the machinery that machined it...
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 01:19 PM
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I remember when a paper I worked for installed a new Goss press. The milwright work was amazingly precise considering the size and number of separate offset units. Got to be even more precise to set up the machining tools for something like this.

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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 02:31 PM
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Default Crankshafts


As a mechanical engineer having devoted 50 years to combustion engine design/development, and the manufacturing machinery required to manufacture all the components thereof, I appreciate the technology that went into the crankshaft that Harry showed in the lead photo to this thread. The large size of that item required it to be made in sections of many pieces, which are fastened together to form the whole crankshaft.

When the "greenies" of the world stop the combustion of fossil fuels, ships that use a crankshaft of this size will need to hoist sails again, unless battery technology leads to nano-scale size batteries, that don't explode like in a Tesla vehicle.
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 04:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonto1 View Post
Those are quite amazing! Looks like a crankshaft for one of those big cargo ships. The engines for them will run on nearly anything combustible. They also have explosive bolts that attach the pistons. That way if something happens to one, they blow the bolts and take that cylinder out of service until they get to port.
I only know about MAN B&W and older Sulzer engines, we don't have explosive bolts. If we want to take a unit out of service we can either keep the exhaust valve open and prevent compression in the cylinder, or secure the engine and remove the piston.
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 04:28 PM
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Originally Posted by DesertRatTom View Post
A long time ago, I worked for Kawasaki's motorcycle division, it was a gnat on the ass of the elephant that company was. Their heavy industries division made ships engines. At the time their hq was in Kawasaki, a city in Japan. Their level of technology then was amazing, I can only imagine the automated machinery they have to make things like this.
When I was on the Mississippi Voyager and Florida Voyager those engines were built by Kawasaki to a Danish (MAN B & W) design. In theory, the same engine is made by dozens of licensees around the world and all the parts are interchangeable....
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