Early woodworking in Oregon... - Router Forums
 9Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-16-2019, 03:14 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Jerry
Posts: 2,645
 
Default Early woodworking in Oregon...

My folks moved to Western Oregon in 1845, Many of our neighbors were loggers that worked in the soods and at tht time the picutes in the video as see in the link below depicted how ist was kdone.

Shortly after we arrived in Oregon, perhaps a year r so later, I recall my dad coming home and tellin my mother about a new say that had been invented, he called it a power say. That was the beginning of a new era of loggina as I recall.

The little stump ranch, as it was called, had lots of stumps of old growth timeber as see in this video, I recall how fascinated I was of the size of those stumps.

Anyway, I enjoyed watching the video and I do recall black and white photes that were taken in the logging opperations in those early years. There was still aome old growth timber available at that time. There was one vary large Douglas Fir tree on our neighbor's kproperty that they called "Big Tree". It was left alone as it was such a large tree and and so amazing to see. It was about ten feet in diameter as I recall, but of course that is only a very old recollection.

Anyway, watch the cideo. It is a different type of WOOD WORKING.

Herry

Jerry Bowen is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-16-2019, 04:05 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Jerry
Posts: 2,645
 
Default

Some more footage

Jerry Bowen is offline  
post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-16-2019, 08:47 PM
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 17,346
 
Default

My brother lives now in Southwest Washington state, about an hour from Portland, in what was once a clearcut forest. A small river (to big and fierce to be a stream) runs through his property. Lots of stumps and most of the existing trees are moderate sized junipers. My dad was born in 1899 in Jallons, France, and his parents were older, probably born in the 1860s or 70s. Interesting to think about how people made a living in those days. Everything was pretty rough, and there was not much safety awareness in those days, so lots of people were seriously injured while working. Not only that, but average lifespan was pretty short and brutish. I find it interesting that women married quite young in those days because one or two births, and they'd die of sepsis. Germ theory was still a bit controversial even into the 1880s, and there weren't many things you could do to survive. Viral infections were really unknown. Surgery was antiseptic, that is, swab everything down with carbolic acid, which was also used to clean and dress wounds. Penicillin came about during WWII, and saved huge numbers of our soldiers.

Alexander Flemming first found penicillin in 1928, but it came into use in 1942, a year before I was born. Many of us here were born and raised in the first generation to have antibiotics. Lifespan went from 43 years in 1800, up to 78 years in 2012 (USA figure), so some of us are pushing pretty near the average span today, especially the bacon eaters among us.

We're pretty lucky to be alive now compared to back then. The good old days weren't that good.
dirt_dobber likes this.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
DesertRatTom is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-16-2019, 10:46 PM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 15,611
 
Default

That 2nd video brings back memories. I worked in the bush here for about 25 years, some of it doing what he was doing. Trees like that one we used to call skybound. In other words they just didn't want to fall over. You'd cut on them until they were just about cut right off and drive wedges in and eventually they would topple over. We didn't have wood quite like at the coast but we did have some big trees just the same. The biggest in diameter I fell was a cedar just under 8' but it wasn't the tallest. The tallest was an Engleman spruce somewhere around 175 or so. We used to get 3 fifty foot logs out of a tree and the tops were usually broken off at 6 to 8" in diameter around that length.
thomas1389 and Danman1957 like this.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-17-2019, 07:41 AM
Registered User
 
Knothead47's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 2,583
 
Default

My son has a book on the logging days in what is now the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. Tulip poplar trees were huge! The sad part is logging destroyed 80% of the habitat for the native Appalachian strain brook trout. There were no regulations on logging in those days. If it is wood, cut it.

John T.
Equestrians are stable people.
Knothead47 is offline  
post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-18-2019, 03:00 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Bruce
Posts: 221
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knothead47 View Post
My son has a book on the logging days in what is now the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. Tulip poplar trees were huge! The sad part is logging destroyed 80% of the habitat for the native Appalachian strain brook trout. There were no regulations on logging in those days. If it is wood, cut it.
What you say about logging today is not true. If the environmentalist have anything to do with it either beetle kill of fire is the way to control the forest. I moved to Wyoming in 2004. I live just east of the Continental divide in the Shoshone National Forest, I have seen 50 plus miles east and west of the divide and 20 to 30 miles north and south, where our forest has turned brown from beetle kill or black and dead because of fire. The forest service has not handed out a major logging permit in over 50 years in this area. The fires in California are a perfect example of how the forest is mismanaged. Because of beetle kill, trees die and fall to the ground they stack up and the forest catches fire and all those downed trees make a lot of fuel for the fire to grow intensely hot and sterilize the earth and nothing grows back. Just look at the landslides California is having this winter, because there is no vegetation holding down the soil. I am also from California and as a child in the 50's and 60's there were no large forest fires in California and that was because logging where thinning out the forest so there were not large fuel loads.

We had a fire here back in 2006 called the Purdy fire, that fire was started my lightening, the fired burned so intensely that when clean up logging was allowed several yeas later. Nothing was growing, no new trees no flowers no weeds, just black earth. Who do I thank for that, the forest service people in Washington DC who have no idea what beetle kill is or how modern and responsible logging is good for the forest. The forest service just bows to the environmentalist. I do have to speak up for our local Forest Service people here in our town. They know what goes on here, they understand the forest a lot better then they do in Washington DC but their recommendations fall on deaf ears.

Okay, Okay, I'll get off my soapbox and apologize to anyone I have offended. I get upset about this because we are slowly losing our forest here because of terrible mismanagement.

CAD-Man
Cherryville Chuck likes this.
CAD-Man is offline  
post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-18-2019, 07:57 AM
Registered User
 
Knothead47's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 2,583
 
Default

Quote:
What you say about logging today is not true.
CAD-man, logging where the park now exists and surrounding areas was over 100 years ago. This was not "today" as you refer. I believe my son's book is, "The Last Train From Elkmont." The book shows mountainsides devoid of any trees- just soil. You can search the history of the park and the area. The community of Townsend, TN was founded due to the logging industry. My wife, son and I have hiked some of the trails, either just hiking or while fishing. We have found the foundations of logging camps and even a rusted car body off the trail in one place. It is said that many such sites are found way off the beaten path. It is interesting that the park now has a resident archeologist devoted to researching and preserving the history of the park.
I love the park! I just wish I lived closer than the 2 hour drive. Wild trout with the Appalachian strain of brook trout, bear, turkey, deer, and a whole sackful of other critters make it a great place to visit and spend some time enjoying the park. I plan on visiting the park more this year. I'm a writer and want to build a library of wildlife and landscapes in the park.

John T.
Equestrians are stable people.

Last edited by Knothead47; 01-18-2019 at 08:09 AM.
Knothead47 is offline  
post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-18-2019, 10:33 AM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 15,611
 
Default

Bruce that forest will grow again one day but it may take a while. Things like fireweed and thimble berry will have to grow first so that the ground is shaded from the sun and retains a little more moisture. I agree with you that it's sad to see something like that happen. That forest could have been logged when it was obvious that it was dying anyway and that would have provided lots of jobs and revenue for the government to pay for things with and provided lumber to build homes. As it was the government spent a huge pile of money on the resultant forest fire with no benefits whatsoever.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-18-2019, 10:52 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Bruce
Posts: 221
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Knothead47 View Post
CAD-man, logging where the park now exists and surrounding areas was over 100 years ago. This was not "today" as you refer. I believe my son's book is, "The Last Train From Elkmont." The book shows mountainsides devoid of any trees- just soil. You can search the history of the park and the area. The community of Townsend, TN was founded due to the logging industry. My wife, son and I have hiked some of the trails, either just hiking or while fishing. We have found the foundations of logging camps and even a rusted car body off the trail in one place. It is said that many such sites are found way off the beaten path. It is interesting that the park now has a resident archeologist devoted to researching and preserving the history of the park.
I love the park! I just wish I lived closer than the 2 hour drive. Wild trout with the Appalachian strain of brook trout, bear, turkey, deer, and a whole sackful of other critters make it a great place to visit and spend some time enjoying the park. I plan on visiting the park more this year. I'm a writer and want to build a library of wildlife and landscapes in the park.
Yep, I read your post incorrectly. You were writing about the past. I am truly sorry.
CAD-Man
CAD-Man is offline  
post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-18-2019, 05:20 PM
Registered User
 
Knothead47's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 2,583
 
Default

CAD-man, no problem. It is amazing how the environment has rebounded over the last 100+ years. It is the most visited national park in the country as it is close to a large percentage of the population. Literally, millions within a day's drive. Cade's Cove is the location of an early mountain community with farms, several churches and a grist mill with the original home for the family. The cove, valley as some would call it, is closed Wednesday morning until 10 AM except for bike traffic. Go in the fall or spring as traffic in the cove is as bad as Atlanta at rush hour. We were told the first time we went there, "If traffic is slow, it is for deer or turkeys. If it is stopped, it is for bear."

John T.
Equestrians are stable people.
Knothead47 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Woodworking for income Duane Bledsoe Lobby 58 01-17-2018 02:11 PM
Sort Members by City or Zip RJM60 Site Help and Suggestions 56 03-13-2014 05:40 PM
Woodworking Specialist Needed Charles M Lobby 6 10-18-2007 02:35 PM
New woodworking show on PBS! Toolfreak Tools and Woodworking 3 03-14-2007 05:57 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome