Interesting but I'll stick to the conventional method - Router Forums
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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 12:35 AM Thread Starter
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Default Interesting but I'll stick to the conventional method


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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 02:04 AM
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Yeah, I've seen videos similar to that before, but the setups seemed a bit more refined than that one. I am open to trying that, BUT I would darn sure make sure the wood was a LOT more in balance than that one was. Way too easy for an out of balance chunk of wood to leave the lathe to risk it. I think the lathe was running way too fast also. But, if you ever want to get an out of balance piece of wood in balance fast, run a power plane across it One, maybe two swipes would be all you would need, then you'd have a nice round, in balance, piece of material. I've done that before, but never with a piece so far out of balance as that one looked. I did trim them down first, and used a slower speed. I sold my lathe anyway, found out all I like to make on one is carving mallets.

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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 07:01 AM
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I just love his speed adjustment method...

And I agree with using a power planer or bandsaw to take the high places off before mounting this out of balance piece in that small lathe!

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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 07:38 AM
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Bill Hylton has plans for a couple router lathes in his "Router Magic" book. Neither requires an actual lathe. I built his simpler one and it does the job. Made several nice canes and a pool cue. I have assembled most of the parts for the much more complex one and plan to build it in the future.

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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 07:47 AM
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Wayne used to be a member here a little while ago....

https://www.routerforums.com/members...an-106516.html

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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 07:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by difalkner View Post
I just love his speed adjustment method...

And I agree with using a power planer or bandsaw to take the high places off before mounting this out of balance piece in that small lathe!

David
David, basically that is how I change speeds. Move the belt on the pulleys, I have four speeds.

I didn't like the on and off switch being so far away. He is also taking the fun out of it.
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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 07:54 AM
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Makes one want to go out to the shop and take the lathe to the metal yard...just in case ya wake up some morning and take an overdose of stupid pills...

When he first started I cringed so much waiting for the corner of the piece to catch the bit head-on that I needed a vacuum release from the chair I was sitting on...


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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 08:36 AM
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Interesting but I don't ever see this happening in a school shop environment. Way too many dangerous things could happen. What I don't see or understand is how the router arm moves. Seems you could move it so it was nowhere close to a replica of the original. Is there a pivot point? As I see it the router can move across at any angle, the pattern keeps the depth. Does it matter if the router approaches at different nagle as long as the cutter makes contact and is controlled from going deeper? Maybe I need to see this in person to see what is actually going on or at least see how the assembly is constructed. But yeah, that seems awful dangerous as was recorded. Especially the fact that it seems the bit could have come into contact with the spindle. Metal on metal wouldn't be pretty. Definitely not for the light of heart.
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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 09:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sreilly View Post
Interesting but I don't ever see this happening in a school shop environment. Way too many dangerous things could happen. What I don't see or understand is how the router arm moves. Seems you could move it so it was nowhere close to a replica of the original. Is there a pivot point? As I see it the router can move across at any angle, the pattern keeps the depth. Does it matter if the router approaches at different nagle as long as the cutter makes contact and is controlled from going deeper? Maybe I need to see this in person to see what is actually going on or at least see how the assembly is constructed. But yeah, that seems awful dangerous as was recorded. Especially the fact that it seems the bit could have come into contact with the spindle. Metal on metal wouldn't be pretty. Definitely not for the light of heart.
start at the 5 minute mark to see how it works


at about 7 minutes he shows he did touch the live center once.....
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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-15-2019, 02:10 PM
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I think he was holding against the flat front with his hands, which would keep it 90 to the material. I'd probably put a couple of strips of low friction tape there to reduce the effort, or space a piece of wood across the area out of sight to help restrain any forward/back motion. Turning is not my thing but figuring things like this out, is.

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