I'm sure that I'm not the only oldie to appreciate this - Page 2 - Router Forums
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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-16-2019, 02:01 PM
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Though I was born in 1951, I still remember about 80% what was mentioned in the list. My oldest sister was a War baby. My dad was in the Naval Reserves and called to active duty just prior to Pearl Harbor. He spent his time as a radio operator on Catalina PBY5A flying Convoy Cover from the US to Greenland and then from Iceland to the west. He and his crew were given an awarded for sinking a U-Boat with a torpedo dropped from their PBY5A.

My military time wasn't quite as exciting as my dad's. I was a Vietnam era Veteran. Didn't go overseas until after the war was over. But I did serve for 11 years and would do it again except I would have served the entire 20 Years.

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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-16-2019, 11:41 PM
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I was born in 1938. I was in about the middle of a large Catholic family. I have seven sisters and two brothers. It's interesting how some things leave their mark on you. My dad belonged to a civil patrol, or watch group and was often gone at night. He worked just up the street at the war plant building the Mosquito bomber in what was originally a farm machinery. We would sit in the dark, upstairs in front of the bay window with Mom, dumb and scared for our own reasons, listening to what was called Waillng Willie. That was the air raid siren that was to keep us on our toes just in case. It seemed to go on forever. Dad got his ears frozen badly one winter night out roaming around. Quite a number of other fathers were overseas at that time. I had two uncles that never returned. One was missing in action in France and the other didn't survive prison camp somewhere. For their own reasons adults at that time were much more close-lipped than most would be now and rarely spoke in front of kids. We remained ignorant and too young to ask. I do recall going for car rides in the summer and seeing the German prisoners sitting in the grass behind the fence around the brickyard. One thing stands out quite clearly to this day. We were playing in the yard and a guy in a grey shirt came out of the field behind our house and asked us where the river was. We pointed the way and he ran off. I remember the big red circle on the back of his shirt. I can think of the fifties, the girls, my first car, the school dances. It's a bit foggy and now it seems idyllic. No T.V. in the early years. We all sat around in the evenings in our big kitchen and listened to the radio. The mysteries, The Great Gildersleeve, Fibber McGee and Mollie. You just let your own imagination create the scene. We could walk to the "show" and save three cents bus fare. Fifteen cents to get in for two movies and a cartoon and the "World News". A Pepsi was five cents. I think a chocolate bar was too at the time. We could roam anywhere in town and never watch out for danger. I guess we were a little older when we would jump up and grab the ladder on slow moving freights for a ride out of town. Or on a dare, walk across that enormous trestle and drop down into the space under the rails on top of the concrete piers as a train went overhead. I don't think I ever told my parents of things like that even as I got a lot older. To this day I can't believe we had the freedom that we had. I've never told my kids of some of the utterly stupid things I did as a youngster. They somewhat envy me when it comes to the times I grew up in, and the rose coloured glasses do come in handy.
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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-17-2019, 05:23 AM
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Ah yes, the radio shows. Fibber McGee and Molly, Amos and Andy, The Shadow, The Green Hornet Superman, The Keeper of the Crypt, Red Ryder, Bobby Benson, Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy (who could ever think that a ventriloquist on the radio could be entertaining?), and more. Back then we used our imagination. Later one neighbor on our road got a TV, and one night a week, every kid in the neighborhood would be one the floor there, watching The Lone Ranger, in black and white. Don't recall if we were ever invited, but as soon as we found out he had it, we invited ourselves. We didn't get a TV until 2 or 3 years at least, after we moved when I was in the 7th grade. The remote was me. Back then the comic strips in the news paper were 4 pages long, and the Sunday comics almost a small novel. Ah, times past. Remember my dad walking up the drive in uniform, with his duffle bag on his shoulder. The train that went thru down, and never stopped, let him off, it was done for every returning military after the war. Good memories, but I'll stick with toda.
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"It ain't what you're told, it's what you know." - Granny Weatherwax
Of course I'm not busy, I did it right the first time.
Call me a craftsman, artisan, or artistic, and I will accept that. Call me an artist and you will likely get a quite rude comment in return. I am not a @#$%ing artist.
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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-18-2019, 11:09 PM
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Memories ... As I will be turning 70 in mid-May, I missed much of what was listed. However, I heard plenty from my parents and in-laws. When my family left England in 1956 (bound for Canada) one of the last things to be done, immediately before boarding the ship, was to turn in the family's ration books. (Yes, some things were still rationed in England in 1956.)

My father turned 18 on VJ day, but still had to do two years service in the RAF. (His father was in the RAF in both wars.) My mother (six years older than my father) was born & raised in London. She was there all through the war, mostly working as a machinist by day and on civil defense duties at night. (I considered her just as much a combat veteran as I am, except she could'nt shoot back.) My father-in-law was in the US Navy. His destroyer received orders to go from Pearl Harbor to Panama on December 1, 1941. The ship operated out of Panama for the duration.

Duck and cover drills in school. The Iron Curtain. Sputnik. The Kennedy-Nixon debates on TV. Telstar. The first time I came home from school and told my mother a homework assignment was to watch a particular show on TV. Plans for building & stocking a home fallout shelter. Invention of transistors. The Beatles on the Ed Sullivan Show. Charles Atlas bodybuilding ads in the back of Popular Mechanix and other magazines. Heathkits. Mercury, Gemini and Apollo. Assassinations of JFK & MLK. Enlisting in the Marines. Becoming a US Citizen. Vietnam. College, marriage and then several "careers".

I consider myself very lucky to have grown up where & when I did, and the experiences gained from that. By the time I was 18 I had lived at 16 different addresses in three countries, so I never made many friends. I did meet my future wife in high school while at one of those addresses, and that is wonderful.

Much is lost when people don't remember and don't pass it on. Maybe 10 years ago I was in my favorite hardware store ... in one area they had a group of hanging flags, including a Blue Star flag and a Gold Star flag. I overheard a young lady talking to her male companion about those and how she would like to have one, and that the one with the gold star would go best with their decor. At that point I approached her and talked to them about those flags and explained exactly what the true "cost" of a Gold Star flag was. She did have the grace to apologize and say she would remember.

I do have fears for the future, especially as our generation passes on. As my mother would have said, it seems like everything is going to heck in a handbasket.
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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-19-2019, 07:55 AM
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These also bring back memories also. I never had a new bicycle but that was a good experience. My father bought us bicycles that needed work. He showed us how to work on the bike and paint to match the way we wanted it to be. We also had an uncle that was a carpenter that built house and we go over to the sites and scrounge wood. My brother and I would build coater wagons with the rope steering. My father even built us a go cart from an old peddle fire truck and gas engine that was off a
washing machine. That engine had a foot starter. Haven't seen another engine before or after that was like it. Engine didn't last long my brother and I replace it with an old real type mower bolted to the back of the fire engine. I also will be turning 70 in the next few week in the beginning of April.
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post #16 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-19-2019, 10:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roofner View Post
That engine had a foot starter. Haven't seen another engine before or after that was like it.
Those type starters were used for years, on engines powering various types of equipment. Washing machines, cement mixers, I don't know what all, and the Cushman motor scooters all had them. Can't recall when the started using them, in the 30s I am sure, possibly before. I preferred them over pull ropes. Don't know when the stopped making them.

"It ain't what you're told, it's what you know." - Granny Weatherwax
Of course I'm not busy, I did it right the first time.
Call me a craftsman, artisan, or artistic, and I will accept that. Call me an artist and you will likely get a quite rude comment in return. I am not a @#$%ing artist.
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