anyone got a swimming pool? - Page 2 - Router Forums
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post #11 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-21-2019, 01:26 PM
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Originally Posted by sunnybob View Post
An electrically operated cylinder produces chlorine from the salt in the water.
it all looks very promising, but i would like to hear from people who have actually experienced the whole thing.
.
Not exactly 'swimming pool' experience, but essentially the same thing

The seawater electro chlorination method is what we use to kill invasive species in our tanks, and to keep growth and grasses from fouling our coolers. Compared to direct chlorine injection that was used previously, it's far less maintenance (back flushing and cleaning every so often) and you don't have to buy consumables as often. Of course, it kills me every time we have to replace the cells, they go for over $5000 each.

https://www.evoqua.com/en/brands/Ele...on-System.aspx
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post #12 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-21-2019, 04:02 PM
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My neighbor's pool is a salt water pool and he travels a lot so I end up taking care of it often. So often sometimes, that it might as well be mine.

The electronic chlorinator needs a low level of salt in the pool water for it to be conductive. It's so little salt that I can't taste it when swimming in it. The electronic chlorinator is just a piece of pipe that the filter water passes through, but it has special electrodes in it. When energized, these electrodes break the oxygen out of atoms in the water, and this oxygen kills the bacteria. The salt is needed to make the water slightly conductive so electric current can flow through the water between the electrodes. This piece of pipe needs to be taken out of the system and cleaned a couple of times a year. I believe that the cleaning solution is an acid, but I'm not sure which. It just etches the surface of the electrodes to remove scale, etc. Nothing seems to break in this system, but the electrodes in this piece do gradually erode and they need replacing about every 2-3 years. Replacement is easy. Just throw this piece of pipe away and replace it with a new one containing the new electrodes and plug the wire from it into the control unit. Keeping the pool water clean with a system like this is easy. I wish it would remove the leaves, branches, hair, and bugs too.

When my children were young, our pool needed chlorine and Ph testing daily. Then I had to measure out the amount of chlorine powder and baking soda to keep the Ph balance correct. I did this at night after the kids were out of the pool for the day. We lived in an area where the well water was slightly acidic, likely because of the surrounding pine forests. Some locations need small amounts of muriatic acid added to the pool to reduce the alkalinity of the water. Mine always seemed to be the other way.

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post #13 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-21-2019, 11:31 PM Thread Starter
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Charley, thats very helpful thanks.

I need to go see the man to find out what the changeover will cost me.
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post #14 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-22-2019, 01:03 AM
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My kids grew up and quit using the pool so I filled it in. A landscaper offered me a bobcat if I would take some fill off his hands. The town was after him to clear his yard. I had it for a week, gratis, filled it in, built a garden shed and planted a garden.
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post #15 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-22-2019, 01:10 AM Thread Starter
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Oh well, time to consider a plan B.
My salt water idea has just fallen flat at the first hurdle. I have just had a granite edging laid around the pool over the new liner. Apparently salt water pools attack open stonework and dissolve them.

Now I have to go find out if glass cullet is better at filtering than sand.
Life aint easy, is it?
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post #16 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-22-2019, 10:45 AM
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My neighbor's pool is gunnite (sprayed in place concrete). It has a concrete edging and small ceramic tile from just below the water line up to the edging. It's now about 10 years old and on the second owner. There is a hot tub adjacent to it, also made the same, that overflows down a waterfall into the pool when not being heated for use. I haven't seen any problems with any of it deteriorating from the salt. Again, there is only enough salt in the water to make it slightly conductive. It's the electrical current flowing through it between the electrodes that separates oxygen from the water to keep the pool clean. I personally would think granite would hold up even better than concrete.

These photos were taken a few years ago, just before a party began that I had been asked to take photos of, but the pool looks exactly the same today. I can't see where the salt has had any effect at all on it. There isn't enough salt in the water to even taste it. It isn't at all like ocean water.

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post #17 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-22-2019, 11:46 PM Thread Starter
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Youve just put me back right where I started from.

This clip is the first one i found, but every online article I've read about salt water lists damage to iron and stone work

Salt water pools require a larger initial investment, making them more expensive than traditional pools.
More complex than traditional pools salt water pools often require experienced technicians even for minor problems.
Salt can cause damage to certain materials, so you may have to avoid using specific types of heaters, fixtures, underwater lighting, liners and even some types of masonry work.



I just cant seem to get anyone to agree on this.

I'm going to the biggest pool shop on the island on monday and ask their opinions.
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post #18 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 08:23 AM
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A strong salt water solution will certainly cause problems, but again, there is very little salt in this pool, only enough to make the water conductive for the ionizer to work. I will try to catch up with my neighbor and find out more. Ocean salt water is very salty, and I agree that this level of salt does damage iron, concrete, and stone.

I found this website that has some good explanations about salt water pools and the equipment.

https://www.discountsaltpool.com/Com...hoC_k4QAvD_BwE


I copied this out of the link above because it relates directly to your concerns, but please go to the link, because there is a lot more information there.

Below is the information that I copied -

Which salt pool system is compatible with my pool & equipment?
How do you know if your pool is compatible if you install a saltwater chlorine generator? There are only a handful of cases where there would be incompatible water chemistry, equipment, or materials. The vast majority of people's pools are compatible as they are- however, below are some examples of things to double check for if you are concerned.

There are very few water chemistry conditions that would prevent you from converting your pool to saltwater. If you are using traditional chlorine in any typical form, you don't have to worry: your water is completely compatible, and you do not need to drain the pool or make any major changes. The salt pool system can be installed and will easily take over water sanitization. The most common chemical issue pool owners face is if they have been using the chlorine alternatives called biguanides, often under the name "Baquacil" or "Soft Swim". Most pool owners simply wait for such chemicals to dissapate to a low enough level in the pool over the winter before converting to a saltwater chlorine generator.

Saltwater chlorine generators are designed to work with your existing pump and filtration system, and are installed in addition to what you currently use. Many pool equipment manufacturers will even advertise that their pumps and fitlers are compatible with saltwater up to a high level of salinity. The most common equipment issue pool owners face is on very, very old pools that use iron or copper plumbing pipes, which are almost non-existent nowadays.

Salt systems can be used on pools that are made of concrete, gunite, plaster, tile, vinyl, fiberglass, stone and more, and are common on in-ground and above-ground pools. Saltwater chlorine generators have been safely used on pools across the country for decades, and now its more common to have a saltwater pool than to not. If you have used rare or exotic materials in your pool construction, always check with your pool builder to ensure that there are no special requirements for your unique pool design.

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post #19 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 09:07 AM
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Doesn't chlorine dissipate over time? My pool is the Pacific, stretches all the way to China and Australia. Kind of trashy in the middle.
I used to live in the middle of the Pacific, about Midway between the east and west shorelines and don't remember it being trashy at all. Actually, it was rather nice.
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post #20 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 10:52 AM
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You're overthinking this Bob. Keep it simple, get a hot tub.
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