anyone got a swimming pool? - Page 3 - Router Forums
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post #21 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 11:46 AM Thread Starter
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If it were down to me, it would be filled in and concreted over. my 3 grandchildren and the missus just gang up on me everytime i mention it.
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post #22 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 12:05 PM
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A friend had a pool that leaked and the expanding soil broke up her concrete pad. It was a terrible problem because if she shut the pool down, the foundation would move again and break up walls. Out here in the Mojave, it would cost a sizable fortune just to fill it. Evaporation would dissipate another $200 of water every 2 months.
@sunnybob Do your grandkids live nearby? If yes, the pool probably encourages visits. My grandkids are all a costly flight away, so we don't get visits. Doesn't feel like family at all.

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post #23 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 12:24 PM Thread Starter
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Tom, my 3 grandkids live over 2000 miles away. But with careful advance booking, air fares are within reach of us a couple times a year.
The boy has clocked up considerable air miles in his 9 years, at least twice around the world when its all added up (I never went on a plane untill I was 24).
All three come out for the entire summer holidays, 5 weeks straight this year. 2 x 9 years and 1 x 8 years. they have spent the last 4 years here and that pool gets big milage for a couple months. But for 7 months of the year it just sits there too cold to get in, but still needing all the maintenance.

I'm not so much for pools, I only get in once the water goes over 30c (86f), which is early June to mid september.
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post #24 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 05:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnybob View Post
But for 7 months of the year it just sits there too cold to get in, but still needing all the maintenance.

I'm not so much for pools, I only get in once the water goes over 30c (86f), which is early June to mid september.
That's because you're not doing it right. You heat the damn thing. If they can do it you certainly can. I'd go for a solar heater, maybe cover the top of the pool with ping pong balls.
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Call me a craftsman, artisan, or artistic, and I will accept that. Call me an artist and you will likely get a quite rude comment in return. I am not a @#$%ing artist.
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post #25 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 06:37 PM
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Bob, when I first read your post, I understood you to be talking about a sea-water pool, polpular with some very wealthy folk in coastal areas, your misgivings would apply in such a case. But I think Charley is right - a saline chlorination does not require sacks of salt, in order to work. More like the salt requirements of a dishwasher in a hard water environment. I have only had conventional pools but a neighbour had one of the early salt chlorinators years ago, without damaging anything.
But is your beef not with the filtration system, if you are considering glass beads?
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post #26 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 11:25 PM Thread Starter
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Theo, although I DO have a pool, I DONT have acres of ground (lol). A solar heating system even here in the middle east requires panels of TWICE the surface area of the pool, and I dont have that space available (nor the money to pay for it)


Biagio, The pool is modest size (small by american standards), roughly 9 metres x 5 metres, but i live with fields on 3 sides of me so there is a huge amount of windblown dust and dirt that needs to be filtered and constant vacuuming. This is becoming a chore as we get older so I am looking for a system that redcues those chores. The "salt water" pool's big selling point is reduced maintenance and running costs. BUT, every article I have read warns about damage to iron work (not an issue for me) and open stone (BIG issue for me due to a brand new unsealed granite tiled edge to the whole pool, and stamped concrete all around the pool).

i'm trying to get enough people singing from the same song sheet to make a very important decision that could cost me thousands if I get it wrong.
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post #27 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 12:03 AM
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Theo, although I DO have a pool, I DONT have acres of ground (lol). A solar heating system even here in the middle east requires panels of TWICE the surface area of the pool, and I dont have that space available (nor the money to pay for it)X
Nah, didn't say anything about panels. Solar heaters, might have to get a pump to pump water thru one, but they are something you can make on your own. Would have to shut it down at night, and turn it on in the morning, but they do work, and work pretty darn well. Plenty of info on-line about them. Lay a hose out in the yard on a sunny day. Turn the water on a few hours later and you get warm water for a minute or two. Solar heater would be the same principle, just more efficient, and larger.

This is just a shower bag, but it will heat to 115f in a few hours:
RISEPRO Solar Shower Bag, 10 gallons/40L Solar Heating Camping Shower Bag with Temperature Hot Water 45C Hiking Climbing XH07
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"It ain't what you're told, it's what you know." - Granny Weatherwax
Some days, the supply of available curse words is insufficient to meet my demands.
Call me a craftsman, artisan, or artistic, and I will accept that. Call me an artist and you will likely get a quite rude comment in return. I am not a @#$%ing artist.

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post #28 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 01:17 AM
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Bob, my take is that the cost reduction is from reduced demand for pool chemicals, which are absurdly pricey, and need frequent attention. But the filtration costs would be the same. I remember the Cyprus dust unfondly- even at the coast.
I eschewed pools almost 30 years ago, when we moved into our present house. But in this pool-mad (water-scarce) country, a lot of folk have tackled the problem with floating pool blankets, which also keep the temperature up a bit. I seem to remember seeing one or two in Cyprus at the time. They fit some pool shapes better an others. Like bubble plastic, can be taken up on a roller (unsightly) at one end of the pool.
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post #29 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 01:53 AM Thread Starter
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Theo, i tried the pumped through a hose trick years ago. Works for heating a dozen or so gallons, but not 10.000 when the pool is in the ground and 5ft deep. Thats very serious outlay on parts and pumps.

Biagio, The latest salt water blurbs are that you no longer need to buy chlorine. I spend at least 300 euro a year on chlorine, and then some more on Ph adjusters and test kits. They also claim reduced pump running time for the same filtration. I have a 3/4 hp pump, so any reduction in that usage over the course of a year is significant.
I have a sand filter that is correctly sized for the pool, but the sand is now 8 years old and everyone is in agreement that it is due for replacement, which is why I am considering glass media at the same time. I also want to build new pump/filter containment area as the original plastic storage shed is deteriorating and if I need to incorpaorate electric salt generating cells this is the time to do it all at once..
So with all these things together, I need to plan what system I will be using for the foreseeable future.
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post #30 of 43 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 02:27 AM
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Originally Posted by sunnybob View Post
as always, internet advice is split and confusing, thats why I was hoping for first hand experience.
A salt water pool (as i understand it) uses only a tenth of the salt content that the sea has. An electrically operated cylinder produces chlorine from the salt in the water.
it all looks very promising, but i would like to hear from people who have actually experienced the whole thing.
My sand filter needs replacing so thats why I'm thinking of going whole hog, with glass beads as well..
I kind of hesitate to offer my experience on this subject, for two reasons, 1) I'm new to it myself and have only been running a saltwater chorination system for a month, and 2) my pool is substantially, smaller. Above ground, 1500 gal.

I can say that I am completely thrilled with the system, the pool water and the dramatic difference in pool water quality and our swimming experience. My pool is really for my 5-yr old granddaughter. She loves the water and swimming and it is difficult to keep her out of the pool. Her mother was the same way. I can say that I do not now get out of the pool due to the "chlorine" experience. I get out because I get cold instead. I didn't stay in last year long enough to get cold.

Our pool last year was less than half the size and we used a cartridge filter and bromine, rather than chlorine. The cartridge filter was completely inadequate and the bromine didn't seem to be very effective. I knew we had to find a better solution.

That solution is a sand filter that is at least twice oversized for this pool. The saltwater is a welcome change. It hardly has any chlorine smell, except when the pool has sat overnight with the cover on, which sits directly on the water. I do not notice it when swimming and the salt is barely noticeable. The pool water is incredibly clear and clean. The oversized sand filter may be largely responsible, but I am convinced the saltwater derived chlorine is doing its job also.

The whole system was challenging to install and get running correctly. This was in large part due to the fact that the filter/salt injector system is a different brand than the pool and the fittings didn't match very well. I had to futz quite a bit and ended up machining some fittings from PVC pipe fittings, including turning "O" ring grooves. Now that it is done and working, it is great. Getting it there was a two week endeavor.

I have yet to add any more salt, although I haven't checked the "chemistry" since getting it set up and running. I need to do that soon.

Both the sand filter and salt injector run in increments of whole hours. The sand filter can circulate the entire contents of my pool in an hour. I run it for two hours, though, so that once the salt injector starts its hour, the sand filter was running before and continues afterward. The injector must have flow through it to function. I have yet to have to backwash the sand filter, at least according the the pressure gauge. Pressure is still in the "green" after a month. Keeping the pool covered when it isn't in use makes a huge difference.

And, as someone mentioned, the salt concentration is quite low. The comment was that it is about one-tenth that of sea water. I think that is a good estimate. I can taste the salt, but it is nothing like that of sea water. I grew up swimming/bodysurfing in southern California in the 1950s. I know what sea water is like. The other thing is that there is no salt residue. I do not notice it on my skin or on my swimsuit or towels. As a kid, I swam once in the Salton Sea, in the desert of eastern southern California. It was difficult to get submerged due to the extra salty water. It left quite a scaly scum on the skin also.

I hope this helps.

Rick

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Last edited by RickKr; 06-24-2019 at 02:30 AM.
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