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post #1 of 66 (permalink) Old 11-16-2019, 03:59 AM Thread Starter
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Default Price/quality

This afternoon I was using one of my multimeters which was working fine but I thought that it was time to change the battery. I bought it about four years ago had never opened it up so was pleasantly surprised at the quality build considering it cost less than $50.00. In spite of having an expensive Fluke digital meter I wanted an analog one with a 15 or 20 volt full scale as most analogue meters only have a 12volt full scale, not good to read a 12 volt source that could be a little over.
Anyhow, out of curiosity I looked on Ebay to see what was currently available and to my surprise I saw several vendors with the same meter and just look at the following price range. I know that if someone paid the top price he/she would be perfectly happy because it's such a good meter, but it shows that price is no indication of quality.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/KT7030-M...frcectupt=true

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/KT7030-A...MAAOSwcyNdgNVt

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/6X-KT703....c100667.m2042

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/4X-KT703....c100667.m2042
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post #2 of 66 (permalink) Old 11-16-2019, 04:00 AM
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watch out for that Duracell Harry...
don't trust it...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
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post #3 of 66 (permalink) Old 11-16-2019, 09:01 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stick486 View Post
watch out for that Duracell Harry...
don't trust it...
I will Stick, I just happened to have a pack of these 9V ones for our smoke detectors and there were three left so I took a chance., their use by date is Jan 2023. If this one leaks within it's use by date I'll claim a new meter.There is nothing wrong with your sight Stick.
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post #4 of 66 (permalink) Old 11-16-2019, 09:59 AM
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Sometimes its nice to have an analog meter. I built one like this when I was in school kind of miss that old VTVM
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post #5 of 66 (permalink) Old 11-16-2019, 12:46 PM
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Those meters are much like any other tool. If you are a tradesman and your living depends on it then you need decent quality. Otherwise a cheap one is good enough. I bought a $10 clamp meter to measure current with and I'm quite happy with it. It may be as inaccurate as by 5% but that's good enough for me as I only need a general idea of what is happening and not a reading accurate to a fraction of a per cent.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #6 of 66 (permalink) Old 11-16-2019, 01:54 PM
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Quality: I work on vehicles when not working on wood and my trusty Fluke 87 V is 15+ years old and still going strong. I sent it back to Fluke to be calibrated several years ago and the tech said he didn't do a thing as it was still within specs. It's a PITA but I remove the battery every time after use both Duracells and Eveready.

I bought a cheapo clamp meter from Amazon for $50 and it died 6 months later.

Last edited by anndel; 11-16-2019 at 02:01 PM.
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post #7 of 66 (permalink) Old 11-16-2019, 03:37 PM
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I have a multi-meter from Radio Shack that is about 45 years old. Also got a battery tester that had two sets of contacts. Both work great. My son inherited my father's Simpson multi-meter. Can't remember what Dad pair for it but it was expensive. Heard that it's good practice to remove batteries when an item is not in use.

Price/quality brings up a situation that my son was in last year. His heat pump died and got it replaced for a tidy sum. The A/C guy said the life expectancy now is 7-10 years. Mine is at least 40 years old- been in our house 23 years. Go figure.

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post #8 of 66 (permalink) Old 11-16-2019, 06:00 PM
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I have a bunch of Fluke equipment that I bought between 1978-1980 back in my electronic days...and yes, it was expensive and much more so than the "cheaper" competitors of the time (if you could call them that)...I have similar experience with Fluke as has been posted above...it still works extremely accurately...and dependably. My Simpson is still going strong... My oscilloscope and frequency generators work today as well as they did when I bought them in late seventies. I have old Craftsman screwdrivers that are better than any that can bought today...and at the time, they were more expensive than others (except Snap-On). Why are people buying "ole arn"...? Why are bearings better in those machines than in many one might buy today...?

I doubt that cheap but "high quality" instruments and tools will last the same 40/50/60 or more years...but I'll wait to get your review 40 years from now. (I sincerely hope both of us are available to discuss it then)

And now for my real point...buying cheap or buying expensive is not the issue...it is whether one buys a quality item based on history, serviceability, longevity, parts availability, safety features and the like. I'm willing to bet it costs more to manufacture the body of the Triton than most other routers just for the sake of the interlocked switch. And let's not forget the survivability of the company whose brand one would buy. There are companies out there that DO NOT have a toll-free number to call for customer service...only email. Those that buy quality on the basis of the points I make actually do spend more for the same item...WHY??? Because it simply costs more to build quality into the manufacturing process and the components of which the item is made...it's just that simple. If one buys for equal performance for a shorter time frame as a higher quality same item for longevity, then that is a choice but it doesn't negate the quality of the higher cost item (note that I specifically used cost of manufacturing rather than price to consumer).

All of us have proof positive that not all quality stuff needs to be expensive. But my experience, which is equally incontrovertible to yours and hence nothing more than the vote that any opinion would hold, dictates that the higher the quality of the tool one buys, the longer it will last. And it's just too bad that most of the time higher quality tools just plain cost more (except those that are more price-driven by marketing - Festool, Woodpeckers, Incra are examples - no offense to those owners, I have some too). I'm willing to bet that the good ole Dewalt ROS at $60 will last as long as Festool's $600 one if not more. If a buyer looks at the hardware involved they will see the difference... Does the intended tool have bushings or bearings...is the bushing made of brass or something cheaper (take a peek at the Tormek copy-cat)...are the bearings needle or ball...sealed or not, and so on. The Barient winches on my 1988 sailboat are made in Australia...they are noticeably better and much more expensive than any of the Lewmar winches. Equally, the Muir Cougar anchor windlass, also Australia, is even older and much more historically reliable and dependable than some of the other brands that have already failed for my fellow sailors. They bought with short term performance in mind without knowing it because they were simply told WHAT TO BUY. And, yes, it has cost them more over the years than the initial investment for the Muir and Barients.

Copycat equipment just does not last as long as the original whether it be a table saw or an alternator, router or crankshaft. Many use stamped parts rather than milled. And if you spend some time evaluating some of your own equipment, I'm sure you will find the same (exceptions accepted, of course). I seriously doubt that the Harbor Freight tool boxes will last as long as my very old Craftsman and Snap-on boxes lining my garage wall. I doubt even that today's Craftsman boxes will last as long. My Fein oscillating tool is almost as old as the patent...yes, I can buy 10 or more HF oscillating tools for the same money...but mine still works after all this time. Would you then slight me for making the recommendation for the Fein, given one's budget and the need for daily dependability and longevity...?

I'm with you that price does not necessarily indicate quality...plenty of examples there. But how about posting HOW TO BUY WITHIN ONE's BUDGET rather than WHAT TO BUY. Expectations should also be noted. It would be much more useful...besides, one-off examples really don't help to prove any point. If one only has $200 for a job-site table saw, the Skil will work just fine (for a while)...on the other hand, if one has $500 budgeted, they should be shopping for a Bosch or Dewalt (or others) in that price range. If a carpenter were to rely on that table saw every day on site, would you recommend the Skil over the other saws...? So, let's instead tell them how to make that decision.

Don't misunderstand me, Harry, I am not advocating to simply buy the more expensive item. I am advocating telling the whole story including expectations based on the criteria, and more, noted above.

I hope my response meets your expectations of "livening up" the thread...I agree, let's liven it up...I'm anxious for your comments on my suggestion above.

Nick

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post #9 of 66 (permalink) Old 11-16-2019, 09:41 PM
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well said Nick...



exactly...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #10 of 66 (permalink) Old 11-17-2019, 08:04 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roxanne562001 View Post
Sometimes its nice to have an analog meter. I built one like this when I was in school kind of miss that old VTVM
Well I never, I too built one at home but whilst still at school, it used a government surplus 1mA movement meaning only 1000 OHMS/VOLT, fine for steam radio only.

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