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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 03-16-2010, 03:55 AM Thread Starter
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Default Language differences

Marco made me think of this.

Many of the differences between North American English and British English are straightforward, with little risk of confusion.
Trunk for boot, Sidewalk for pavement, Faucet for tap. Some spelling variations, sometimes.

Some, though, seem more confusing. Biscuit, for instance, means something quite specific in British English. It is thin, crisp and either sweet or savoury. When I pick up on it in American literature, it is clearly something else as the food combinations sound peculiar. I cannot imagine eating chicken with biscuits, for example, so biscuit must mean something different from a European biscuit. What is an American biscuit please ?

MacDonalds routinely refer to something they call an English muffin, which bears to resemblance whatsoever to any muffin made in England and has more in common with a cupcake.
An English muffin is a circular bread type product, with a lot of holes in it, which uses yeast as a raising agent, rather than eggs.

Rubber is quite innocuous in British English, meaning simply a piece of rubber material used to erase pencil marks, but causes problems elsewhere as it is more commonly used to mean something else which in the UK, we call by a traditional brand name, Durex, rather like Biro for a ball point pen, or Hoover, for a vacuum cleaner.

The one most likely to raise eyebrows amongst Brits are references to the American 'patting someone on the fanny' in public, invoking thoughts of a complete pervert ! (Fanny in British English is slang for a female's front parts, not the rear ones !)

Cheers

Peter

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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 03-16-2010, 06:44 AM
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biscuit recipe - Google Search Mainly recipes for american ones at least towards the beginning.

Biscuit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia has british and american ones sitting side by side in the upper right side pic.

As for rubber, when I was a teenager 25 plus some years ago now, it was commonly just called a trojan and not advertised on TV or magazines with the prominence it now has. Or as we some times called it, an "intergalactic prophylactic". Normally was some beer or distilled spirits involved when called that. They were also hidden behind the counter at a lot of places I shopped (if available at all) and I had some friends who were embarrassed to purchase them even up until the late 1980's.
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 03-16-2010, 09:12 AM
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"An English muffin is a circular bread type product, with a lot of holes in it, which uses yeast as a raising agent, rather than eggs."

Could you be confusing this with a CRUMPET Peter?

My memory tells me that a MUFFIN was indeed a circular bread "roll" which we cut in half (top and bottom) and either ate it buttered or toasted it.

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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 03-16-2010, 09:26 AM
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I think an English muffin is like a crumpet, although decidedly not savory/sweet like how Wiki describes it.
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 03-16-2010, 09:47 AM
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Crumpets and English muffins are decidedly different.
However, as you can see below, the English muffin that Mcdonalds sells looks just like the muffins they have in England to me, and certainly quite different to the crumpet pictured.
The confusion comes when you introduce the other more common type of muffin which indeed does look like a cup cake.



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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 03-16-2010, 09:57 AM
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An English Muffin looks just like two crumpets to me. :shrug:
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 03-16-2010, 10:22 AM
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I though an English muffin was a pretty female?

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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 03-16-2010, 10:23 AM
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I'm strangely hungry now......


I am fond of 'flogging spanner' which I've always known as a slugging wrench

I prefer 'grounding' to 'earthing', just because it rolls off the tongue a little easier

Even in the states the same word can have different meanings. In one part of the country if you ask someone to give you a 'pop', he'll hand you a soft drink, in another neck of the woods he'll smack you upside of the head.

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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 03-16-2010, 02:24 PM
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Yep in Canada if you order tea at a restaurant you will get a nice steaming pot of steeped tea, in the States you get a tall glass of it with lots of ice. You need to be specific about the hot or cold. This was something I experienced on a trip to Texas.

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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 03-16-2010, 06:50 PM
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This is making me want some blueberry muffins and some cornbread muffins...or even just some cupcakes. Not had lunch today and wrong post to see when supper is going to be a few hours away.
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