Anyone used Grizzly's "Shop Planner"? - Router Forums
 
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-27-2013, 01:10 AM Thread Starter
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Default Anyone used Grizzly's "Shop Planner"?

I was using it tonight tonight... Sharon was sitting next to me, then asked what I was doing. I told her, it was a layout of the garage... and that you place pictures of machines in the layout to help plan where it is going to go.

She said that program was pretty accurate... That there is so much, it doesn't fit. I was laughing so hard, I had to give up for tonight!

EDIT-- We are still thinking another Utility shed to move some things out of the garage... or an enclosed carport to expand the garage out...

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."

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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-27-2013, 08:05 AM
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Good morning "Tater-Head",

Whenever we have moved or redone a room, Joy has me make sketches of her furniture and at the same scale make her a sketch of the room. We call it "making paper dolls" and she gets called-on to help with this when our daughters and grands have relocated or simply rearranged a room. Just simple graph paper works well and then you simply making "plan" sketches of the furniture.

Thinking about what that (in your case's) equipment's purpose is - means there often need to be extra room given. For instance, a furniture example of this would be a recliner - one needs more room than simply how the "straight-up" recliner rests - but rather needs to consider its opened-up posture. Thinking about ingress, egress & workflow - while considering movability of things you might need to "take on the road" (I doubt seriously that "The Big Laguna" is going to be "on the road") will also play important parts in your considerations. Another thing that I've always felt important to consider is electrical outlet locations (110/220) and lighting - because little is more aggravating (at least for me) than tripping-over extension cords or air hoses. I've also built my workbenches with good access and storage capacities above and below.

Also, if there is a time when your equipment is pulled back from a wall, or an adjacency with another machine - that might be your ideal time to add outlets (for electrical or air) to walls or ceilings. If air, I am sure you will be installing drains for condensation - which then makes you need to consider headroom or offest drainage to a collection point.

Take care my good friend,
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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-27-2013, 01:34 PM
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Whenever we have moved or redone a room, Joy has me make sketches of her furniture and at the same scale make her a sketch of the room. We call it "making paper dolls" and she gets called-on to help with this when our daughters and grands have relocated or simply rearranged a room. Just simple graph paper works well and then you simply making "plan" sketches of the furniture.
Yep, just about the same as I was going to suggest. Love graph paper. Just make sure you get the paper with four squares to the inch (1/4"), and not five squares to the inch. Except I suppose if you're used to metric you'd prefer the five squares.

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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-28-2013, 01:11 AM
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Mike I moved from a 24 x 40 shop with three overhead doors into a 24 x 16 with a stairway taken out of 1 corner and a double door. I carefully laid out the floor plan on graph paper and drew up and cutout each machine, toolbox, workbench and shelf, and guess what, there wasn't enough room for everything.

Maybe I needed graph paper with bigger squares!

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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-28-2013, 03:49 PM Thread Starter
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Default Graphically...

Attached is the general layout...

What is not there on that is that there is a commercial sunbed, my oxy/acetelene torches, a commercial MIG welder, many tool buckets, wood stock, etc., etc.

Even though that sliding table saw's fence extends out the wall in the drawing, mine doesn't. But other than that, it is fairly accurate for the rest of it. To get around the saw with the outrigger on, I have to slide the table to where the tool cabinets are to get around that outrigger table. If I do sheets crosswise, I have to move the saw away from the wall and make sure I don't have anything on top the tool cabinets. To move something through the garage and get around the saw, I have to remove the outrigger table and latch the swing arm to the saw.

Like Mike (from Detroit), I have to constantly move stuff around to make room to work.

Sharon is thinking we need more floor to ceiling cabinets to move my tools out of tool buckets and just pack up the tool buckets when I go out on work. (Good idea and needed.) She is thinking that we also need another utility shed, close enough and with a sturdy enough floor, to move the welders and sunbed to... (also needed)

My other welding machines are in the big utilty shed... and I move them down when I need to use them.

But I'm thinking instead of another utility shed... of an enclosed carport... extending out the garage about 20 feet... To work now, for some things, I'm working out in the driveway anyways. Or support the side wall of the garage with beams and blowout/move the side wall out. Even only 5' out would add a lot there. Going that way would give more room to work with that saw and to be able to get around it. 8-10" would be ideal... But I don't have the property standoff to go out that far that way... and then I might need permits going that way here. Calling it a carport ad not attaching permanently to the garage might be simpler in that respect.

With so much "stuff", and so little space and the constant movement of things just to be able to work... it's continual work in just doing that and in trying to stay organized. I'm expending a lot of time there, which I could be spending working.
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"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."

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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-28-2013, 07:30 PM
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With so much "stuff", and so little space and the constant movement of things just to be able to work... it's continual work in just doing that and in trying to stay organized. I'm expending a lot of time there, which I could be spending working.

LOL.......exactly.

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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-29-2013, 02:17 AM
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Originally Posted by MAFoElffen View Post
Attached is the general layout...

. . .
Like Mike (from Detroit), I have to constantly move stuff around to make room to work.

. . . With so much "stuff", and so little space and the constant movement of things just to be able to work... it's continual work in just doing that and in trying to stay organized. I'm expending a lot of time there, which I could be spending working.
I like your drawing, you put a lot of thought into it too. One question, two actually about your thickness planer: does the outfeed line up with the top of you router table? And do you plan on planing only 2 foot long boards or move the drill press?

Having your kind of space problem is really not a bad thing.

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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-29-2013, 06:45 AM Thread Starter
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That router table is actually shorter that the infeed/outfeed tables. Long stuff can come in from out the door. The drill press gets turned sideways and pushed to the wall. Then I use adjustable roller stands on both sides. Short work seems fine on the existing infeed/outfeeds. The workflow goes that way and the controls are eaiers to adjust that way. If it's wider than the planer, then everything comes off the table and I have another jig that secures to table and router jigs... Or gets done on my portable workbench outside. The thickness planer spends a lot of time getting moved around or put on the floor.

For long stuff with the router table, it gets pulled from the wall slightly, stuff on the workbench pushed to the wall or removed. Infeed supported on the workbench. Outfeed out the door, roller stand.

Band saw gets used in place... Or if longer, it gets pulled from the wall and the outfeed goes out the door.

RAS/Overhead router/Shaper, small stuff in place, longer pulled from the wall with roller stands.

Table Saw, in place or pulled from the wall. But it is the most used. Has the most clearance. And weighs 1200 pounds. Takes the pallet jack. The mobility kit is still on a scenic cruise, coming next month.

The DC can go out the door and still do it's job.

The concrete drive outside the garage is fairly level and is 10 wide by 20 foot long. My old shop saw, another RAS is in the driveway (still trying to sell) and the bar-b-que. Gravel parkng with a driveway to the street. Big utilty Shed off from the gravel parking. Room to work in the yard also. More parking back in the alley.

The pallet jack gets used allot, helping move stuff around. Then I have a portable flatbed cart. Thinking about getting a 1000 Lb. hydraulic table cart...

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."

Last edited by MAFoElffen; 07-29-2013 at 07:26 AM.
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