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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-13-2013, 03:13 PM Thread Starter
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A big part of a conversation are those thing's called idioms.
In an earlyer thread I was thinking that I would write: "(Toimii kuin junan vessa) It works like the toilet in a train", but I thought that 0% of you would understand what I mean. For a person who arn't born or living in N. America or in The Comonwealth of Nations it is allmost impossible to use idioms on a forum like this (unless you havent spent year's in an English speaking country). In Finland idioms are used widely. How is it, how common are they in everyday American/English language?
Here in Finland the thing abow means that it work's like a dream

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My profession is to restore old loghouses that is in the classical way. Look at www.tiny-e.fi and (FB) Tiny-e. Restaurointipalvelut for exaples
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-13-2013, 05:06 PM
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I'm sure there are some great idioms from Newfoundland...if I could just figure out what they're saying(?)...
A Newfoundland Language Lesson with Mark Critch, Candice Walsh and Travel Yourself - YouTube
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-14-2013, 08:13 AM
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Why, Dan, that's nearly pure queens parlance!. You should hear Namlish, or Angolish (from Namibia and Angola).
Tiny, all the languages that I am familiar with is idiom rich, only sometimes you must know the peculiarities of the area or the people to catch the phrase. I like your phrase "It works like the toilet in a train" , please use idioms like that.
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-14-2013, 10:50 AM Thread Starter
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Ok Roland. (Train toilet's might drop some readers but thats life, yes?) As you know, they can't be translated so they have to be
direct-translations : )
I'll try to shoot.
That was a bad one

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My profession is to restore old loghouses that is in the classical way. Look at www.tiny-e.fi and (FB) Tiny-e. Restaurointipalvelut for exaples
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-14-2013, 01:29 PM
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There are many idioms in the English language Esko. I try to avoid them when I respond to you. I was in Switzerland many years ago speaking to a Swiss citizen who had learned English in Britain and spoke it very well. One day he asked me what I was doing and I said "killing time". He gave me a look like I was Jack the Ripper. I then realized that what I had said couldn't be translated word-for-word. Since then I've tried to be careful what I say when speaking to someone who does not speak English as their first language.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-14-2013, 03:44 PM Thread Starter
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It's kind of you Charles that you spear me from English idioms. I like them though but if I try to follow both idiom's and technical language I might get lost just as Dan pointed.
One friend of mine ones send me a link of Finnish idioms. Here it is. The list isn't done "(as if) urinated while running".
Have a good time!

Esko

My profession is to restore old loghouses that is in the classical way. Look at www.tiny-e.fi and (FB) Tiny-e. Restaurointipalvelut for exaples

Last edited by Tiny; 11-14-2013 at 03:50 PM.
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-14-2013, 03:52 PM
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!...Who you callin' an idiom?!
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-14-2013, 04:25 PM
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I didn't read them all Esko but some are very interesting.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-14-2013, 04:41 PM
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Some of them are kind of garbled, Esko, For example 'ei nähdä metsää puilta'
is given as "not to see the forest from the trees".
The English idiom is 'can't see the forest for the trees', in other words, you can't see the whole forest because the individual trees block the view.
In this case the word "for" is used as "because of" .
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-14-2013, 05:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaninVan View Post
Some of them are kind of garbled, Esko, For example 'ei nähdä metsää puilta'
is given as "not to see the forest from the trees".
The English idiom is 'can't see the forest for the trees', in other words, you can't see the whole forest because the individual trees block the view.
In this case the word "for" is used as "because of" .
Nah, means you can't see the forest because all the trees are in the way.
They do tend to get garbled with distance, even in the same language.

"It ain't what you're told, it's what you know." - Granny Weatherwax
Gather the villagers, pitchforks, torches; we march at dusk!
Some days, the supply of available curse words is insufficient to meet my demands.
.....Call me a craftsman, artisan, or artistic, and I will accept that. Call me an artist and you will likely get a quite rude comment in return. I am not a @#$%ing artist.
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