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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-05-2014, 11:22 AM Thread Starter
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I had a near squeak yesterday and thought to share it with you in the hope that it might save fellow woodworkers from pain.

It was the end of a long day fitting a cupboard with drawers and had not been going that well but I was on the home run. Already one of my battery 'drivers ' had died and the other was on the way out. Just a few screws left so 'what the hell' ! I put my driver bit into the mains electric drill and drove the last ones in at terrifying speed. The very last screw, as always, was right at the back and needed a bit of hand wedging to stay in the correct location. As I squeezed myself into the tight space I realised I had left the mains drill out of reach. I could however reach the dying battery driver and thought I could squeeze one last burst from it. It went pretty slow and I detected the pressure on my thumb nail just as the screw started to bite through my nail. I stopped pretty damn quick !! I had made a stupid error in my tiredness and left my hand in a vulnerable place.

If I had been able to get the mains driver I would have screwed myself to the fitting and caused one hell of a lot of pain.

Moral of this is that when your battery drivers have decided to call it a day so should you and Never use a driver bit in a mains drill.

Its all very obvious !
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-05-2014, 11:43 AM
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"...Never use a driver bit in a mains drill."

Well, no, wrong lesson learned my friend. Keep your other hand away from the business end of your drill/driver! Use needle nose pliers if you absolutely must grip the screw.
Having said that, a Robertson bit in like new condition will hold the screw perfectly fine!
There are crappy bits, and then there are good quality well machined bits. Pay the little bit (heh...) extra; worth every penny, especially if it's magnetized. But keep your hands away from the whirly things!!!
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-05-2014, 11:46 AM
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It's good that it ended well Alastair. Another moral to the story is always be mindful about where your other hand is. Many times while drilling holes I've realized my holding hand was in the line of fire. Also a good idea before squeezing the trigger on an air nailer. The more times you nick yourself the better you remember. I speak from experience on this subject.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-05-2014, 12:02 PM
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Like Charles said, voices of experience. It only took once in my case. I was leaning into my 1/2" drill when the driver bit jumped from the screw socket and came smashing down on my fingernail ... 10 out of 10 on the pain scale.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-05-2014, 12:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alastair View Post
It was the end of a long day .... but I was on the home run.
The push to finish a project often causes one to 'do what it takes' to get the job done. tiredness, shortcuts, often sneak in when are better judgement is worn down by fatigue.

Glad that you didn't suffer a serious injury.

Doug
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-06-2014, 06:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alastair View Post
I had a near squeak yesterday and thought to share it with you in the hope that it might save fellow woodworkers from pain.

It was the end of a long day fitting a cupboard with drawers and had not been going that well but I was on the home run. Already one of my battery 'drivers ' had died and the other was on the way out. Just a few screws left so 'what the hell' ! I put my driver bit into the mains electric drill and drove the last ones in at terrifying speed. The very last screw, as always, was right at the back and needed a bit of hand wedging to stay in the correct location. As I squeezed myself into the tight space I realised I had left the mains drill out of reach. I could however reach the dying battery driver and thought I could squeeze one last burst from it. It went pretty slow and I detected the pressure on my thumb nail just as the screw started to bite through my nail. I stopped pretty damn quick !! I had made a stupid error in my tiredness and left my hand in a vulnerable place.

If I had been able to get the mains driver I would have screwed myself to the fitting and caused one hell of a lot of pain.

Moral of this is that when your battery drivers have decided to call it a day so should you and Never use a driver bit in a mains drill.

Its all very obvious !
I have found that battery drivers always let me down. I always use a variable speed mains drill for all my work. With the variable speed on the trigger you have the control you need with the torque required.
Cheers
Paul
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-06-2014, 07:35 PM
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Alastair
Always keep both hands on the handle ! Lol. Seriously tho, we have found that using a battery impact is a whole lot better than using a drill. A screwdriver bit makes a nasty hole in flesh if it has push behind it - voice of experience!
Dennis

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Good tools don't cost- they pay!
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-11-2014, 11:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaninVan View Post
"...Never use a driver bit in a mains drill."

Well, no, wrong lesson learned my friend. Keep your other hand away from the business end of your drill/driver! Use needle nose pliers if you absolutely must grip the screw.
Having said that, a Robertson bit in like new condition will hold the screw perfectly fine!
There are crappy bits, and then there are good quality well machined bits. Pay the little bit (heh...) extra; worth every penny, especially if it's magnetized. But keep your hands away from the whirly things!!!
Dan, It's nice to see a "Robertson" bit being called what it is. So many have no idea what a "Robertson" screw or bit is. So many refer to it as a square bit or square drive but the twain shall never meet.
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-12-2014, 06:41 AM
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Dan, It's nice to see a "Robertson" bit being called what it is. So many have no idea what a "Robertson" screw or bit is. So many refer to it as a square bit or square drive but the twain shall never meet.
Thomas, please enlighten me - is there a difference between the Robertson screw and what we call here a square drive screw? Or is it just the nomenclature? Rob
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-12-2014, 11:58 AM
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Nomenclature Rob. Robertson was the inventor. It's a square recess that is slightly tapered and when the recess is accurate and a quality bit is used you can have trouble getting the driver back out occasionally. They hold quite well with the screw on the driver and being held in a horizontal position. The US has finally come up with a Posidrive and Unidrive which is a combination Phillips and square recess which is still not equal to the original which is 107 years old this year.

Both Robertson and Phillips worked for Henry Ford. Robertson refused to sign over his idea to Ford but Phillips was willing and the rest is history as they say. The Phillips head was actually better for the auto industry. You can't over tighten a Phillips but I've twisted the head off many Robertson screws.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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