Do you see what I see? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-29-2016, 01:07 PM Thread Starter
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Default Do you see what I see?

Most of my projects are built without plans other than a quick sketch. The majority of the design work and components are in my head and change as needed as the project progresses.

My friend Jim (Chessnut2) said that he thinks I visualize things like guys in a movie who have holograms floating around in front of them to depict them concentrating on something. Not quite, but close. I do "see" the various pieces and how they connect and work together in my mind and then accept or reject based on what I think will actually work. Sometimes if my concept isn't quite clear I'll make a physical mockup to test it.

I'm curious about how others "see" their projects. When you look at plans do you visualize the pieces or just see the flat drawing? Do you assemble pieces in your mind or do you need to physically put them together to understand them? When you have an idea do you just start working (like I do) or do you make drawings first?

In a recent post, Tom (DesertRatTom) said that "The more you create, the creative brain cells start firing", which is right on the mark. But then he said, "A hand cranked, gear driven mechanism ... is not something an ordinary mind is set up to create."

You're making me nervous, Tom. Here I was believing I had a perfectly ordinary mind. But now ...? Anyway, I'm curious. Surely the rest of you see things like I do. (Please say, yes.)
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post #2 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-29-2016, 01:23 PM
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Sorry, Oliver. I don't think most of us have the ability to see things as you do. However I think you are truly blessed to have your abilities. Some of the things I make I have a preconceived vision of how I want them to turn out. Most things as I start on them I "see" them as I want them to be. I think you are very normal for a genius and I enjoy your work so don't think of checking in to the funny farm.
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post #3 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-29-2016, 01:38 PM
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Great question. I don't exactly see pictures. My visualizations are kind of abstract, picturing shapes moving around sometimes. Other times its just I "know." Best example of this is when we first walked onto the property that's our house, there was a 125 by 275 food back yard with a few dead trees and lots of weeds. But in that moment I had a brief mental flash of the finished yard, pretty much as it is now, with trails, dry streambed lined with rocks and an island shaded by trees. When I started working on it, it was pretty much plugging in parts that fit the picture.

I generally start projects from a rough drawing. I might fiddle with details of the drawing, but mostly solutions bubble up during sleep, or that time when you are nodding off. My noodling with drawings are generally to work out how to make the jointing work, and to work out and record measurements and details I might forget otherwise. Sometimes it helps work out the assembly sequence.

I write a lot, mostly non fiction, and in considerable detail. Way back in my newspaper days, I realized that if I forced the writing it was generally lousy. So if possible I'd wait a bit until I got that flash and the story was ready to write itself. This was especially effective when I'd interviewed someone. I no longer write against deadlines (for the most part) but my best stuff always bubbles up like that.

The creating process is really a verb, not a noun. In other words, it is a live thing that occurs mostly in flashes. I isn't something ground out with internal self talk as if it were a narrator. A very long time ago, I did nontheatrical, 16mm films. I had a gift for forseeing how the shot should look and how all the shots should be done to make good continuity and flow. Again, it was more knowing than pictorial visualization.

The thing I like about woodworking is that it is solid, three dimensional and when its done, you have a thing to touch and use. Most of my life, my output has been ephemeral, temporary, or the production of someone I've coached or consulted. That is satisfying in its own, and very different way.

As to brain power, I've found that you can tell a lot about intelligence by the way a person moves or leaps from one thought to the next on a theme. The most intelligent people I know hear an idea, then leap two or three leaps ahead on the implications and possibilities that emerge from the first input. An IQ of 100 is about normal, and really is sufficient to do nicely in life. About 160-170 you start finding weirdness popping up.

One of the great influences in my life is reading Krishnamurti, an Indian teacher who steered you to the realization that most of what we call thinking is more like rumination; spitting up old ideas and notions instead of just being present to what is right in front of you. Not adding your prejudices and opinions and fixed thinking, which is what murders creativity and originality. Keeping the idea open for some time is where the unconscious mind gets to work its magic.
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post #4 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-29-2016, 01:45 PM
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I cut and assemble in my mind...it helps me find the problems ahead of time. It then makes it easier to see the whole project while I'm actually doing it. If something comes up differently while working on it, it will make me think twice before I change the plan.

In that respect, yes, but I think most visualize ahead of time...but you get 1st prize for seeing a bunch of scrap laying around and picturing it different ways...

I enjoy seeing the results of your projects...
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post #5 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-29-2016, 02:11 PM
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Oliver...
your mind's eye is in a realm all of it's own...
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post #6 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-29-2016, 02:25 PM
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I do like you Oliver and usually try and have the finished product in my mind but if there are multiple components I like to have a sketch so I can do the math on the measurements and sometimes I'll do part or all of it with a CAD program or sketchup so that I can find lengths or angles that would be hard to calculate otherwise. If my material is only just enough for the project I also like to build a cut list to make sure it will work out.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #7 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-29-2016, 02:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaffboat View Post
Most of my projects are built without plans other than a quick sketch. The majority of the design work and components are in my head and change as needed as the project progresses.

My friend Jim (Chessnut2) said that he thinks I visualize things like guys in a movie who have holograms floating around in front of them to depict them concentrating on something. Not quite, but close. I do "see" the various pieces and how they connect and work together in my mind and then accept or reject based on what I think will actually work. Sometimes if my concept isn't quite clear I'll make a physical mockup to test it.

I'm curious about how others "see" their projects. When you look at plans do you visualize the pieces or just see the flat drawing? Do you assemble pieces in your mind or do you need to physically put them together to understand them? When you have an idea do you just start working (like I do) or do you make drawings first?

In a recent post, Tom (DesertRatTom) said that "The more you create, the creative brain cells start firing", which is right on the mark. But then he said, "A hand cranked, gear driven mechanism ... is not something an ordinary mind is set up to create."

You're making me nervous, Tom. Here I was believing I had a perfectly ordinary mind. But now ...? Anyway, I'm curious. Surely the rest of you see things like I do. (Please say, yes.)


Oliver, I'm pretty sure that you have not only an ordinary mind,but a very good one.

I think that, as I think I have said before, each of us is different, each has been given their own gifts. One is not better than the other, just different.

I never use plans because I can completely visualize a project in my mind, being able to execute what I visualize is another matter.

Some people, such as my brother, loves to draw plans and work from them, I don't. One of us is not better or more talented than the other, we are different.

Jerrry
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post #8 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-29-2016, 03:45 PM
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Oliver, obviously you have a talent that is to be envied.

Some people have an unusually good ability to visualize things, particularly of a mechanical or physical nature. I think a lot of that has to do with what we were introduced to as children. Whether or not we were born with these abilities, I really don't know.

I like Tom's comment about writing something and comparing the flowing version against the forced version. There is always quite a difference there.

I get the impression that anything mechanical comes into your mind instantly. It really doesn't require a lot of thinking...it simply pops into place.

I would like to say I have the same ability, but mine seems to be limited to things strictly mechanical, whereas you have the added bonus of having an artistic bent thrown into the mix. Heaven knows, you sure have demonstrated that repeatedly.

What can I say but keep up the good work.

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post #9 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-29-2016, 03:49 PM
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I can follow plans, but I cant draw them. I start out ok, but then go vague when it comes to depth. I have patience issues with things that are not solid, but will have endless patience solving the problems as the build progresses.
Everything I do is a progression, altering almost everything from the original thought.

i think about the outcome a lot, and go through three or four mental upgrades and "its easier if i do it this way instead of that way" stages.

Makes me very slow at making stuff, but I get such a buzz from overcoming obstacles, most of which I put there on the bumpy road to completion.
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post #10 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-29-2016, 05:07 PM
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Oliver that is the difference between a good worker and a wonna-be. I am a wonna-be.

Don in Murfreesboro,Tn.

Measure once cut twice and it's still to short.
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