Baltic Birch Tear Out - Router Forums
 
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 10-12-2009, 03:16 PM Thread Starter
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Default Baltic Birch Tear Out

I make 30" x 30" simple frames covered with baltic birch vs. canvas for my wife who is an artist. She paints on the baltic birch. I am having some difficulty with tear out on the Baltic Birch. I have tried taping the cut with green painters tape prior to cutting (on my cabinet saw) but still get some tear out. As some of the cuts I do are as little as one 64th of an inch (as i finish trim the frame to have the pine sides flush with the baltic birch top) I don't see how I could ude a sacrificial board. Any suggestions?

A "Torn" Husband in Canada
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 10-12-2009, 05:29 PM
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Welcome to the forum Ross!
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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 10-12-2009, 07:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Ross Wigle View Post
I make 30" x 30" simple frames covered with baltic birch vs. canvas for my wife who is an artist. She paints on the baltic birch. I am having some difficulty with tear out on the Baltic Birch. I have tried taping the cut with green painters tape prior to cutting (on my cabinet saw) but still get some tear out. As some of the cuts I do are as little as one 64th of an inch (as i finish trim the frame to have the pine sides flush with the baltic birch top) I don't see how I could ude a sacrificial board. Any suggestions?
Dampening the top face veneer along the cut line seems to work to avoid splintering on cross-grain cuts once you've done all you can on blade height. I use an acid brush and cup of water.

Cutting the birch over-sized and then using a flush trim or pattern bit in your router should make blow-out less likely and take less work. Make the cuts with the face grain last so you don't have to worry as much.
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 10-13-2009, 12:14 AM
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Greetings and welcome to the router forum.

Wisdom: Where experience and knowledge combine and become one.

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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 10-19-2009, 09:27 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
Dampening the top face veneer along the cut line seems to work to avoid splintering on cross-grain cuts once you've done all you can on blade height. I use an acid brush and cup of water.

Cutting the birch over-sized and then using a flush trim or pattern bit in your router should make blow-out less likely and take less work. Make the cuts with the face grain last so you don't have to worry as much.
Thank you for the suggestions Drew I'll try them tonight.

Ross
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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-06-2010, 06:09 AM
 
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Default Stiffen the grain.

Your wife probably lays down a base coat before painting. If she does, try painting the edges to be cut with the same stuff and letting it dry completely before making the cut. This may give the end grain enough extra strength to resist tearout.

Find out what she uses for paint thinner too, you'll probably need it to clean the blade after cutting.
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-06-2010, 09:40 AM
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It might be as simple as using a different toothed and sharper blade.
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-06-2010, 10:16 AM
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Hi Ross,
Try scoring the cut line with razor knife prior to cutting.

James
Whittier, CA.

Have a nice & safe day!
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