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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-21-2012, 04:58 PM Thread Starter
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Hi All,

I'm Bryan and I'm a avid woodworker based in Melbourne Victoria. I've been specializing in router woodwork for the last 10 years and my Favourite router is a Festool OF1010 which was given to my by the Staff at Festool Australia, following my time there as National Training Manager. I now work full time in a large retail power tool store in Melbourne where I'm their Festool Specialist and I write about router technique and power tools on my site
I look forward to getting involved in the forum and hope to hear from some of you soon

Cheers

Bryan
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-21-2012, 09:34 PM
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Good to have you here. We look forward to your contributions.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-22-2012, 02:06 AM
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Greetings Bryan,

Welcome to The Router Forums. Though I have heard of the name mentioned in and around the forums here, I don't have any hands on experience with the Festool brand of tools.

Some thirty years into tinkering with wood as a general utility material, it's just been during the last year that I have started using routers.

I look forward to learning from your posts in the future.

wbh1963 is flowing with the grain in Arlington, Washington, USA

A day without curls is like a day without sunshine!
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-22-2012, 04:32 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the welcome Bill. It's great that your getting into routing; personally, I think they are the handiest tools in the shed.
What routers have you got and what's been your experience with it?
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-23-2012, 01:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tutorwood View Post
Thanks for the welcome Bill. It's great that your getting into routing; personally, I think they are the handiest tools in the shed.
What routers have you got and what's been your experience with it?
Hi Bryan,

I suspect you are well aware of many of the concepts tossed out in this reply. I went ahead and wrote it in full detail mode so that others who may take the time to read it can benefit more from their time spent.

I picked up three different used units to learn with. They were all less than $50 and sparse in the feature offerings that dominate the 'modern router marketplace'. A speed adjuster from Harbor Freight was well worth the $20 price tag and works with the MF7900 units. I haven't tried it with the Craftsman yet.

Though they have similar current consumption (9 amp) maximum ratings, the MF units make it pretty clear something has changed in the way Horsepower is measured or represented to the buying public.
  1. Millers Falls 7900 (Circa 1960)(1/2" Collet - 1.5HP?)
  2. Millers Falls 7900 (Circa 1960)(1/4" Collet - 1.5HP?)
  3. Craftsman 135-17508 (1/4" Collet - 1.5HP?)

Three different tables were rounded up to contribute to this experiment in crafting:
  1. Wolfcraft 6155
  2. Craftsman 320.28160
  3. Ryobi BTS-3100 Table Saw Extension


Since obtaining them, my 'project' experiences with them have been minimal. The 'real' experience has been in trying a wide variety of cuts, solely for the 'personal enrichment' purposes.

In my mind, learning what *I* can actually do (well) with them and increasing the scope of that ability set is a process better undertaken before putting steel to 'nicer woods'.

My need to give all due diligence to discovering the best way for *me* to make all these different kinds of cuts drives me to try every different way I can afford.
  1. Table Saw
  2. Radial Arm Saw
  3. Dado Stack for 10" Saws
  4. A growing collection of specialty planes


I generally put more value in the quality of cut than the 'hands on' time needed to make it. In contrast to that 'who cares how long it takes' approach, extra time for set up annoys me, and clean up sends my mind looking for a 'better' way.

When I started the process of hands on with routers, I assumed they would become my 'preferred' method of cutting various types of joints. Actual results turned out to be quite different!.

While a router is certainly capable of removing the 18 cubic inches/300CC of wood that need to go away when half-lap jointing 2x4 boards. A dado stack on a TS or RAS tears through it in a lot less time.

Two specific tasks remain solidly in the realm of what I feel is best done with a router:
  1. Cutting slots (all the way through a board to add adjustability to a jig or object)
  2. Putting a pretty edge on a board. (especially one with curves in the profile)

I still need to try cutting shaker and horse nose profiles with a hand plane, but don't anticipate the cross grain portion will be as therapeutic as the edge that runs with the grain.

Two types of cuts cry out for the befits offered by a motorized cutter:
  1. The addition of curves into a profile
  2. Working across the grain

My viewpoint is that the machines we call routers, source their 'flexibility' in two different ways.
  1. Cutters (Literally Thousands of differently sized and shaped bits)
  2. Manner of Use (with or without Jigs & Guides as appropriate)
    1. Free Hand
    2. Table Mounting
    3. Ski Attachment
    4. Overhead Pin Mounting
    5. Computer Enhanced (CNC Type Setups)

Perhaps at the end of the day, the person using the tool kit is the real router and the objects within the tool kit simply enhances their effort to transform the shape of the workpiece into it's desired form.

wbh1963 is flowing with the grain in Arlington, Washington, USA

A day without curls is like a day without sunshine!
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-23-2012, 03:12 AM
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Bill; some of the really valuable jobs that a router excels at are related to productivity and accuracy. Hinge gains, especially in a door hanging commercial application. laminate work, both trimming and fancy edging (Corian for ex.) Accurate cutouts using templates.
Probably most valuable would be the invention of CNC.
Hobbyists perhaps tend to forget the daily drudge work that routers do for the trades.
The Zipcut type of small handheld router has made huge gains in productivity for wallboard hangers. For the tapers as well; no more (at least a lot less) repairing badly cut out electrical outlets!
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-23-2012, 03:28 AM
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I didn't have to finish reading all of your comments before I started smiling, on account of them being awesome.

Mortising a hinge relief is actually one of the few 'actual' project cuts I have done with a router. I helped my cousin build out a 'chuck box' that used a piano hinge. The two laminate panels on it were trimmed with a router as well.

I suppose my 'windy' response to Bryan was focusing on my crude and very limited experience with them. It could be years before I am satisfied enough with my joinery that I move on to the realm of fluffy appearance and finish work... Recess work on the other hand is definitely router territory, though perhaps not exclusively.

I also know that when square footage allows me to leave them set up all the time, it will change the balance of the game....


Quote:
Originally Posted by DaninVan View Post
Bill; some of the really valuable jobs that a router excels at are related to productivity and accuracy. Hinge gains, especially in a door hanging commercial application. laminate work, both trimming and fancy edging (Corian for ex.) Accurate cutouts using templates.
Probably most valuable would be the invention of CNC.
Hobbyists perhaps tend to forget the daily drudge work that routers do for the trades.
The Zipcut type of small handheld router has made huge gains in productivity for wallboard hangers. For the tapers as well; no more (at least a lot less) repairing badly cut out electrical outlets!

wbh1963 is flowing with the grain in Arlington, Washington, USA

A day without curls is like a day without sunshine!
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-23-2012, 10:39 AM
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Hello Tutorwood
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 05-23-2012, 10:46 AM
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Hello Bryan hope to learn from You and maybe hopefully help Ya as well

K.I.S.S.- Keep It Super Simple
For I Am Confussion at its Best
Don't fix it if it Ain't broken
Makin sawdust now in South Louisiana
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