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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-08-2012, 05:18 PM Thread Starter
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Default Introduction and three questions

Hello, My name is Bob and I am by no means an experienced woodworker, but I try. I never had the time to become accomplished as I spent 21 years in the US Army and have worked ever since I retired. I had a heart attack almost 3 years ago and was recently laid off, so I at last have time to pursue my favorite hobby other than fishing. It appears no one wants to hire a 60+ year old with a bad heart, oh well, their loss. Anyway, onto the questions:

1. I am going to build a router table and have a sheet of marine grade 3/4" plywood, what should I use to laminate the top surface?


2. I need to fabricate a door threshold for my daughters home built in 1780, it still has the original door. The threshold has rotted and I bought some 2x10x8 ft rough cut white oak and need ideas for a jig to cut the tapered surfaces.
This is a drawing of side profile,

3. I wish I could post my drawing but I use Linux and it doesn't do pdf files
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-08-2012, 05:23 PM
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Hi Bob. Welcome to the forum.

I would laminate both surfaces with HPL or Laminex.

If you only do one side, there is a possibility of the top warping due to moisture entering (can just be high humidity) on the uncoated surface.

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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-08-2012, 05:40 PM Thread Starter
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Okay, figured it out, here is the file, sorry it is so small.
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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-09-2012, 07:58 AM
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Welcome.First I want to Thank You for the time you served in the Army for our Freedom.
I can not see the measurements in the drawing but it looks like both bevel cuts can be made on a tablesaw.If you want to make this using a router ,you will have to make a jig like a mortising jig but on an angle.I have seen a jig on here and on woodsmith shop.com that was use for making raised panel doors just a straight fluted bit.You will have to change the diminsions of the jig to suit your need but it will work.
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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-09-2012, 08:26 AM
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Welcome Bob I live in a much newer house only 180 years old and have to replace a few thresholds. What I found woks best is to make them as thin as possible out of antique wood (if possible)and round the edges. The first photo is an original one which was simply a slab from a tree. The second is one that I replaced with wood about 3/8" thick. The third one was done by a previous owner. It was made out of oak and in my opinion is too thick and looks like it belongs on an outside door. Even if the thinner wood leaves a larger gap under the door it still looks more in line with what should be there.
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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-09-2012, 10:57 AM
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If the long taper is too deep for your tablesaw, find someone with a bigger saw or it can easily be done on a jointer with the guard removed.
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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-09-2012, 01:04 PM
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Looks like it could be a job for the bandsaw, if the table tilts enough.
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-09-2012, 03:01 PM Thread Starter
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Sorry, the threshold is for an entry door, I am going to try to take a screen shot and post it as a pdf file, patience please, and thanks for all of the responses!!!
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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-09-2012, 03:14 PM Thread Starter
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Default Here is drawing in two parts

My table saw does not have depth of cut to do it. I was thinking of a jig similar to a scarfing jig used for boat building, I will see, can't hurt to try.
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File Type: pdf threshold1.pdf (12.4 KB, 55 views)
File Type: pdf threshold2.pdf (12.2 KB, 32 views)
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 12-09-2012, 04:07 PM
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The first cut I'd make would be on a table saw, to make the step at the top of the long slope - a simple cut 0.25" deep while the plank is still square. You could also do it with a router or even hand-held circular saw, both guided with a fence of course.

For the short slope, 1" to 1.5" part, table saw or bandsaw would be easiest, followed by careful belt-sanding at slow speed with the mildest grit belt you can get, to the finished dimension.

For the slope leading to the 1.25" dimension at the step, where presumably the door stops, I'd use the table saw ideally, but you could do other things.

You could achieve both slopes with a router jig, or rough-cut with a table saw and finish on a router jig. I'd make the jig square, and make supporting wedges to hold the workpiece at the angles you need, it'd be easier than making an angled jig.

Edit: Sorry - just re-read your post about your saw's limitations. Take off whatever the saw can take, then make successive vertical cuts into the waste, remove the rest with a router jig as I've suggested.

Last edited by JCJCJC; 12-09-2012 at 04:11 PM. Reason: lack of concentration ;-)
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