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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 12-25-2012, 07:11 PM Thread Starter
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Default Router power requirement

I have a Porter Cable model 690 type 6 router. Is that powerful enough to make raised panel doors? I read somewhere that I needed at least 2 1/4 hp to do that. I'm not sure but I think my router is 1 3/4 hp. My raised panel bit is a Skil.
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 12-26-2012, 12:33 AM
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Welcome Glen.

The more power the better, but some members use smaller routers. Just take finer passes to get to the required depth.

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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 12-26-2012, 02:53 AM
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Hi Glen and welcome!

If you use a conventional panel raising bit like these:



you not only need a large router (2HP+), but you also need to have a router which is cvariable speed (don't know if your P-C has that feature) because the speed needs to be reduced to 10 to 12,000 rpm. Don't dispair, though, there are vertical panel raisers such as this:



from MLCS and others, made for use in lower powered routers which additionally don't need any more power than your P-C 690 has. There a video on YouTube here showing the process of making "cope and stick" doors which shows a vertial panel raiser in use at about 1:44 onwards

Regards

Phil

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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 12-26-2012, 07:11 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the info. That is what I wanted to know. So, what does the excess rpm do to the work piece? I have the first type of raised panel bit you showed. (Skil)

Since, I have it I'll probably try it just to learn. Any dangers?
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 12-26-2012, 09:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dgcutter View Post
Thanks for the info. That is what I wanted to know. So, what does the excess rpm do to the work piece?
More of a tendency to burn the wood.

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Originally Posted by dgcutter View Post
I have the first type of raised panel bit you showed. (Skil)

Since, I have it I'll probably try it just to learn. Any dangers?
Dangers? YES. Read the following.
Safe Speeds for Big Router Bits - Fine Woodworking Article
http://www.rockler.com/articles/router-bit-basics.cfm

Excerpt:

" Router Bit Speed


Better routers are equipped with a speed adjustment that allows for speed adjustment typically ranging from around 8,000 to 24,000 rpm (revolutions per minute). The reason is that not all router bits can be safely or optimally run at the same speed. Larger router bits have more mass and therefore a potential to create forceful vibration at higher speeds.

It's important understand what router speed actually measures. "Revolutions per minute" is simply a measure of the number of times that the bit makes a complete revolution in a given period of time, and not a measure of the speed at which the body and cutting surfaces of the bit are actually traveling. The outer perimeter of a 3-1/2" diameter bit is actually traveling significantly faster at 24,000 rpm (and much faster than it should be) than a 1/2" straight bit's cutting surface would be at the same shaft speed.

Manufacturers often supply maximum free-running speeds for the router bits they sell. The maximum speed for a given bit is the maximum speed at which it can be safely operated, and may not be the best speed for the task. There are other factors to consider: router horsepower (a less powerful router will slow down when it's driving a large bit through a cut), feed rate, quality and condition of the bit, and the cutting properties of the material. It is impractical to give a list of specific speeds that will work well in every situation.

In general, a faster speed is more desirable than a slower one, for the simple reason that a faster speed provides more cuts per inch, and more cuts per inch normally yield a smoother cut. Using sharp, high quality bits and using the correct feed rate go hand in hand with bit speed in making a clean cut. Make practice cuts with a new bit until you are able to produce a smooth, even feed rate that is neither so fast that it produces a rough cut, or so slow that it results in burnishing and burn marks.

The chart below offers speed guidelines for the maximum safe free running speed of bits of various diameters. This is supplied for general reference - manufacturer’s guidelines should be consulted:

Router Bit Diameter Maximum Speed
Up to 1" 22,000 - 24,000 rpm
1" to 2" 18,000 - 22,000 rpm
2" to 2-1/2" 12,000 - 16,000 rpm
2-1/2" to 3-1/2" 8,000 - 12,000 rpm"

NewWoodworker.com LLC

GCG
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 12-26-2012, 10:58 AM
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Hi

Hi dgcutter

Your router will do the job with the Skill bit BUT you want to get the speed control box for your router 1st...

Router Speed Control

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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 12-26-2012, 12:12 PM
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Originally Posted by dgcutter View Post
Thanks for the info. That is what I wanted to know. So, what does the excess rpm do to the work piece? I have the first type of raised panel bit you showed. (Skil)
Hi Glen

Single speed routers generelly have a fixed speed of 22,000 to 25,000 rpm. Large diameter panel cutters often have a safe speed limit on them of 8,000 to 12,000 rpm depending on size - this is clearly marked on the shank of the cutter. It is dangerous to run a cutter too fast because of the increased chances of a catastrophic failure of either the router bearings or possibly the cutter. Glen has given you good advice about the speeds. I recommend you heed it

Regards

Phil

"Unfortunately there is lots of bad information online; some of it is really scary. It's probably not intentional, but I've seen some content that sets up the illusion that you can do whatever you want and get away with it" - Norm Abram in an interview with Jefferson Kolle
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 12-26-2012, 01:05 PM
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About what was mentioned before, I would like to expand.

First, that bit is only recommended for use in a "router table"... at around 10,000 rpm to 13,000 rpm. Important.

Second, even though I have a 2-1/4 hp router, I take off in 1/4 depth bites at a time, with a 1/8" to 1/16" cut for the finish cut. Any more at a time and it would look terrible in quality --AND-- it would be too dangerous. You would run the risk of the bit grabbing the work piece. Hard to get that blood out of the grain of expensive hardwoods.

Your fence needs to be able to clear that large a bit and suggest that it have two sliding fence extensions that you can use to shield the unused portion to the bit with. Having said that, I set my fence to the finished cut setting, then use shims between my fence and fence extensions... That way I can take my cut, remove shims, take cut... until I'm the my finished cut. Faster than resetting my fence each time.

I have to confess that I start out with a 3/4" shim and work in from there. Yes, it's a 3-1/2" bit, but at 3/4" out from finish, it's not taking off a whole lot and it's a rough cut anyways. You might have to judge that for yourself... and how your router and the quality of the cut is handling it.

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Last edited by MAFoElffen; 12-26-2012 at 01:14 PM.
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 12-26-2012, 02:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MAFoElffen View Post
I set my fence to the finished cut setting, then use shims between my fence and fence extensions... That way I can take my cut, remove shims, take cut... until I'm the my finished cut. Faster than resetting my fence each time.

I have to confess that I start out with a 3/4" shim and work in from there. Yes, it's a 3-1/2" bit, but at 3/4" out from finish, it's not taking off a whole lot and it's a rough cut anyways. You might have to judge that for yourself... and how your router and the quality of the cut is handling it.
Hi Mike - I operate my fence very similar to you except I set at the final depth and place stop blocks behind it. Then I move the fence forward to start the process. That way I'm not presuming what the subsequent cuts should be but am able to vary the cuts as dictated by the results of the previous cut. Just another way to do it.

John Schaben

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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 12-26-2012, 03:02 PM
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Hi

I do it a bit diff. if I use the big 3 5/8" bits, I use the 2 bearing way,I use a bigger bearing then a smaller bearing for the last pass but I make more arch panel doors with the back cutter on the bit at the same time..

http://www.sommerfeldtools.com/3pc-C...fo/800.522.11/

http://www.sommerfeldtools.com/6pc-C...fo/800.515.11/..

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Last edited by bobj3; 12-26-2012 at 03:11 PM.
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