Air dry small quantity of wood indoors? - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-18-2013, 01:20 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Barry
Posts: 588
 
Default Air dry small quantity of wood indoors?

Sorry in advance for the long posting. One of my neighborís trees fell over in a storm last spring and part of it landed in my yard. He never did anything about it, my wife was not happy, so yesterday I cut it up with a small chain saw. Since it was towards the top of the tree, the branches were not large but, I salvaged a log 5Ē diameter and 30Ē long thatís almost straight. Iíd like to try my hand at sawing it into lumber on my bandsaw. I have a ĹĒ woodslicer blade and figured Iíd build a sled to hold the log and give it a try. I know the Woodslicer blade is not designed for green wood but this is a small log and itís been down for over 6 months (not touching the ground). Iíd feed it slowly so the chips could clear. I figure that the very best I could get out of it are 3 boards 7/8Ē, and 2 boards ĹĒ, max 30 inches long. Once its cut Iím sure it will be less than that.

I know that air drying outside is the best way to dry wood. However, I donít have any kind of area to do that. All I have is a concrete slab in the back yard and in this area, northwest of Philadelphia, we can get wind driven snow in the winter and heavy, wind driven rain in the spring. My shop is in the basement. Now the question; can I dry it in my shop without totally screwing up the wood? Temperature is in the low 60ís all year round with normal home humidity which varies by season. We have a whole house humidifier for the winter. We also have a dehumidifier in the basement that rarely goes off. Of course, thereís not a lot of air flow other than when Iím running the shop vac. What do you think Ė sticker it, weight it and see what happens? Considering what I paid for it, if it became unusable, it wouldnít be a tragedy but Iíd like to do the best I can to make it work. Since this is totally new to me (all I know is what Iíve read on the internet) Iíd really be grateful for any and all suggestions.

I donít know if it makes any difference, but I think the wood is birch. Iím not sure since Iím not great at reading bark, Iím better with leaves, but the bark sort of looks like Birch. If itís a different species of wood would that make any difference? Finally, after I cut it I brought it into the garage and sealed the ends with 3 coats of Sealcoat shellac.
Barry747 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-18-2013, 03:12 PM
Moderation Team
 
Semipro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Country: United States
First Name: John_*
Posts: 6,676
 
Default

Barry
never try drying my own lumber but I have read about it I believe your biggest problem would be that it would dry to quickly causing checking

Looking forward to your participation.
Filling out your profile to include (first name,tools and short bio is strictly (optional )but does help members to better relate to each other.
Thank You John
Semipro is online now  
post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-18-2013, 03:37 PM
Registered User
 
JOAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Country: United States
First Name: Theo
Posts: 6,584
 
Default

Never gave it a shot either, but I would probably put it in the attic. Probably even better, the garage, if it's unheated. One never knows until one tries.

"It ain't what you're told, it's what you know." - Granny Weatherwax
Fawkahwe tribal police SWAT Team
Some days, the supply of available curse words is insufficient to meet my demands.
.....Call me a craftsman, artisan, or artistic, and I will accept that. Call me an artist and you will likely get a quite rude comment in return. I am not a @#$%ing artist.
JOAT is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-18-2013, 05:43 PM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 15,908
 
Default

I've dried lots, probably most of it was white birch. White birch is bad for twisting and bowing. It will probably be too warm and too dry inside. It also works better if there is a lot of weight on the pile, but it still needs good airflow past the faces and sides of the boards. You won't have much invested in this small amount of wood so give it a try. If the ends start to crack right away it's drying too fast. It is also better to keep it fairly dark too.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is online now  
post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-18-2013, 06:34 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Canada
First Name: Dennis
Posts: 430
 
Default

I have been playing with drying some cherry and apple for the last 3 years. I have it stickered in my unheated shed. Currently I am making a small box for my grand daughter from the oldest cherry pieces. These planed up perfectly. I don't think you will have a big problem drying inside. Drying outside exposes the wood to extremes of temperature throughout the year, particularly if you have a winter climate. A more regulated climate should be fine I think (but I've never done it). Make sure you use pine or other similar stickers so the wood won't pick up stains. Weight it very well. I use concrete blocks on top of a sheet of ply to distribute the weight. My attitude is that if it works it's great and if not well no big loss. Good luck.
denniswoody is offline  
post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-19-2013, 07:37 AM
Registered User
 
Billy Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Country: Canada
First Name: Bill
Posts: 109
 
Default

Hi Barry. I air dry wood all the time in my live edge woodcraft business. I have found that the cooler the temperature the better. I use spacers between each piece and cement blocks for weight on the top of the pile to prevent warping. I think outside drying is better. You could tarp the wood pile. We do most of our drying in the winter and use fans to keep the air circulating around the wood. Inside would work if you could keep the temperature as low as possible. Good luck. Billy Boy Bill Major
Billy Boy is offline  
post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-19-2013, 10:51 AM
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 18,067
 
Default

You might get some of the wax based liquid you paint on the ends of the boards to keep them from drying too fast and checking. Probably have to order it. Rockler has it, but I'm sure others do as well.
DesertRatTom is offline  
post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-19-2013, 03:19 PM
Registered User
 
DaninVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Canada
First Name: Dan
Posts: 14,915
 
Default

I walked out past the woodshed this morning. It's wetter inside than outside! Basically a 14' x 16' 'carport' like structure with steel roof.
We're in the depths of a long-lasting fog bank, 4 days and no sign of burning off; everything is dripping wet, especially the underside of the metal roof! .
Ah the joys of living beside the ocean...
The dampness just cuts through whatever you're wearing.
DaninVan is offline  
post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-20-2013, 01:35 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Barry
Posts: 588
 
Default

Thanks for all of your suggestions. I'm going to try a middle ground, so to speak. I have an unheated garage. That's where the log is right now. As we go into the winter the temperature will be colder than the house and not subject to rain and snow. Not a lot of air flow but some since the garage isn't sealed all that well. On a windy day you can feel the breeze. I hope to to be able to cut up the log later this week. I'll let you know how it turns out in the spring. Thanks again.
Barry747 is offline  
post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-20-2013, 03:40 PM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 15,908
 
Default

I stored some in the attic of my shop once, which would be similar, and that turned out okay so it should work as well as anything else you could do. Good luck.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Setting Up a Small Wood Shop?? Advice Needed? WoodHaven Tools and Woodworking 63 08-31-2017 02:45 AM
A suggestion from Maurice harrysin Woodturning and Lathes 48 12-08-2013 09:16 AM
Routing a groove on a small piece of wood Jackalope1966 Jigs and Fixtures 8 07-15-2012 08:28 AM
Framing a small piece of wood lea6141 Table-mounted Routing 10 08-19-2010 04:01 PM
Sourcing wood for small boxes tomcoleman Starting Off 2 11-19-2008 10:32 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome