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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-05-2013, 02:32 PM Thread Starter
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hi i am a carpenter from uk and recently purchased a second hand makita 12 mm (1/2") MODEL 3600BR for what i thought was a bargain price of 35 pounds but after using it today to cut some kitchen worktops i noticed quite a lot of sparks coming from the top of it, the deeper the cut or more strian on the motor the larger the sparks.
Does anyone know if this is a easy fix or it the old boy on the way out?
any advice will be greatly appreciated as i am not very good on the technical side of routers love using them though the most versatile power tool known to man.
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-05-2013, 03:38 PM
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Hi John welcome to the forum.

Looking forward to your participation.
Filling out your profile to include (first name,tools and short bio is strictly (optional )but does help members to better relate to each other.
Thank You John
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-05-2013, 03:59 PM
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HI John. I would check/change the brushes first.

I have found that hand tools are the best choice when I want to make mistakes at a slower rate of speed.

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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-05-2013, 04:03 PM
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G'day John. Welcome to the forum.

Previous posts about routers sparking have led to suggestions the brushes may need changing.

The 3600 is a great router but may have been used hard for many years.

A router that old may be due for a new set anyway.

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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-05-2013, 05:54 PM
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Welcome to the forum John.

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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-14-2013, 02:45 PM Thread Starter
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thanks for the feed back guys i have managed two worktops with the router as it is and to be fair so long as i took it easy it performed very well and the boss was happy with the results as far as i can tell i did also receive 2 new two flute trend cutters to replace the one i used so i am all ready for the next kitchen work tops and i am sure the nice new good quality cutters will make it even easier for the trusty makita to chop through with less sparks .
New brushes sounds like a quick and easy solution so will definately try that as soon as i get some spare time very busy at the moment doing 12 hour days so not top of my list of things to do especially as demand for it is not high at the moment unfortunately as i love it very much and cant wait to get back routering the best wood working power tool known to man
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-14-2013, 03:12 PM
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Hi, John; welcome!
the commutator may need some TLC as well. It may be as simple as polishing it with something like 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper, to remove any oxidation and crud* buildup. Keep in mind that routers operate in a very hostile environment...if the router hasn't been stripped down and thoroughly cleaned in a long time, it's way overdue. For starters, give it a really good blow out with compressed air; that should be a regular maintenance task. It only takes a few seconds.


*crud= highly technical term for, well, crud...
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-14-2013, 05:05 PM
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hi

It can be many things I would check the drop cord if you are using one..if you have power at the end of of drop cord blow out the router..take the cover off the switch and blow it out well...

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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-15-2013, 08:05 AM
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I'm with Dan. on this one, remove the brushes then dismantle the router which is self explanatory and clean the commutator as Dan . described but also remove the rubbish between the segments, a hacksaw blade with the teeth ground flush with the blade makes this easy. Here is a shot of a 3600BR that I dismantled.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 11-15-2013, 12:44 PM
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Curious question to you motor gurus:

Assuming in this example that it is the brushes and/or commutator, and replacing brushes and a good cleaning could be the fix--would it be correct to guess that the more it's used before the maintenance the less likely it will be to salvage the life that is left in the motor? Obviously there is no way to nkow the point of no return, but it just seems that taking the time to do this may be a wise investment.

Thank for the education!!

earl
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