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post #1 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-03-2014, 05:30 PM Thread Starter
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kickback..
hello all, im from mexico and new here.... I just finished building my router table with my 7614 black and decker router but now I'm scared to use it, because of the risk of getting hurt with a posible kickback.
Any help regarding this matter will be greatly appreciated
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post #2 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-03-2014, 05:46 PM
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Hi Fernandito and bienvenido to the forum. The only time you need to worry about a router tossing a board is when you have a board trapped in between the bit and the fence or when you try to lower a board onto an already spinning bit. When you use your new table, feed the wood into the bit from right to left and keep your fingers away from the bit when routing small or narrow pieces. It's good to start cautiously but if you use good sense it is much safer than you are believing it is. If there is any thing in particular you are not sure about don't be afraid to ask. We are all glad to help you.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #3 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-03-2014, 06:07 PM
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Welcome to the forum.

If you follow the advice of Charles, you should have no problem.

Only feed from right to left and always have the cutter between where the cut is being made and the fence.

Study some techniques on YouTube and buy a good book to show some tips and tricks.

James
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post #4 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-03-2014, 06:23 PM
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Welcome to Router Forums, glad to have you join us, I'm positive the members of the community would be more than willing to answer any questions you have

Looking forward to your participation.
Filling out your profile to include (first name,tools and short bio is strictly (optional )but does help members to better relate to each other.
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post #5 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-03-2014, 06:28 PM
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Welcome to the forum.

Ross,
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Enjoy the knowledge of others that can be found within.

‘Members are requested to add a first name in their profile as we are a very friendly bunch here'.
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post #6 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-04-2014, 12:13 AM Thread Starter
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Hi Charles, thanks for your fast reply, I'm confused tho. James from Australia tells me and I quote "always have the cutter between where the cut is being made and the fence." and you say that the only problem is when the Wood gets trapped between the bit and the fence, both approaches are basically the same and put me at ease for cuts on the edges, however when you want to make cuts in the middle like dovetails, dados or "V" grooves I won't be able to follow your advice, or am I misunderstanding?
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post #7 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-04-2014, 12:09 PM
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James and Charles are saying the same thing...James just made it clearer.
Welcome, Fernandito!
If you were cutting a rebate, you'd make the cut on the fence side, not the outside as that would be breaking the rule about trapping the work between the cutter and the fence. Using feather boards to hold your work against the fence is a really good practise.
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post #8 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-04-2014, 12:18 PM
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Fernandido, de que parte de Mexico eres, yo también soy de Mexico. Por otro lado sigue el consejo de James: Study some techniques on YouTube and buy a good book to show some tips and tricks
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post #9 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-04-2014, 12:50 PM
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Fernadito, when you are making a groove or dovetail (also a groove) the forces on each side of the bit oppose each other and equal each other. What James was referring to was where you would be working on an edge treatment. You would have most of the bit behind the face of your fence in that situation. You would never want to have the workpiece between the fence and the bit. That is trapping the workpiece.

There was a recent post by someone who had tried to use their router and table to cut a workpiece to the proper width because they did not own a table saw. The workpiece was thrown from the table with great force. That person was also probably feeding the workpiece from the wrong direction. As I already said, normal feed direction is from right to left, but that is with most of the bit behind the fence. In this case, feed direction would be from left to right because you are working on the other side of the bit. The rule for feed direction is that you should always be feeding toward the flat face of the cutter and never towards the beveled side. Feeding in the correct direction will require you to push your workpiece into the bit and going the wrong way the router will either drag you towards it or rip the workpiece out of your hands and throw it.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #10 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-04-2014, 03:32 PM
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Fernadito, Welcome. The fence is always set so that there is no space between it and the bit. Also, feed from right to left when the router is in the table <---------. If you want to feel safer, use a padded pushblocks to keep your hands safe and to allow you to work with some shorter pieces.

You are probably going to have to use a jig of some sort to cut dovetails, which will make it somewhat safer. One thing you might consider, even when using the router freehand is a foot switch so you can stop the router without physically letting go of it.

I second the recommendation that you get a book and watch YouTube videos on safe operation of the router. It will show you how to use it safely. It is a much safer tool than some others, but caution is always a good idea.
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