Router Forums - Reply to Topic
Thread: A no-no? Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
04-14-2011 10:52 PM
Cherryville Chuck
Quote:
Originally Posted by allthunbs View Post
Ok, next lesson please:

I have to cut a "stepped groove" in a piece of maple. The objective is to create a place where my wife can put some stained glass. The cut is 3/4" wide and goes through a 3/4" piece of maple. Another cut expands the 3/4" groove to make a shoulder that the glass sits in. I do the first cut by dropping the workpiece down on the bit. I have to turn it end for end to do the next cut. This is the one that's tricky. The bit is not pulling the workpiece into the fence, it is pushing it backwards and pulling it from the fence. If I do it the opposite direction, it gets worse and potentially propels the workpiece out the door. How would you widen a slot?
Ron, If I read this correctly, you are talking about making stopped grooves by dropping the piece onto a router table. If that is correct, I would strongly suggest you dont do that. You should secure the piece and plunge from the top side. You could build a jig that has stops to contol length and width.
04-14-2011 06:54 AM
allthunbs Ok, next lesson please:

I have to cut a "stepped groove" in a piece of maple. The objective is to create a place where my wife can put some stained glass. The cut is 3/4" wide and goes through a 3/4" piece of maple. Another cut expands the 3/4" groove to make a shoulder that the glass sits in. I do the first cut by dropping the workpiece down on the bit. I have to turn it end for end to do the next cut. This is the one that's tricky. The bit is not pulling the workpiece into the fence, it is pushing it backwards and pulling it from the fence. If I do it the opposite direction, it gets worse and potentially propels the workpiece out the door. How would you widen a slot?
04-14-2011 06:35 AM
Jack Wilson What everyone seems to have avoided saying, and what I often do, is place a second "fence" in front of the bit. The work piece is trapped, but only a minimal amount of bit is exposed and the work cannot 'jump' out of place. At times I have even screwed a piece against the fence as a hold down so that the work piece cannot rise either. If this is a bad idea I'm sure to hear about it now!
04-13-2011 09:52 PM
matt1710 Hi Alan - thanks for the very thorough explanations, and for illustrating a good way to evaluate the options before cutting.

I've certainly learnt a few things as a result of my mistake :
1. never feed between bit and fence
2. always feed against the bit rotation
3. where possible, use featherboards - but don't rely on them
4. always use a push stick

I did do 3 & 4 above - I'm being very careful due to my inexperience (for example, even clamping the stock to my finger joint jig even though I could safely hold it with my fingers) so hopefully I'll continue to stay safe.

Matthew
04-13-2011 06:33 PM
AlanWS You want to control what happens. One simple way to evaluate the cut is to think about the direction the bit is pushing on the stock.

You want it to help to hold the work against the fence as it cuts. A and C do that, while B and D push away from the fence - bad.

You also want it to push opposite the feed direction, so it can't be pulled away from you with your hand pushing toward the bit. B and C are against the bit direction, while A and D are climb cuts - bad.

Finally, if the stock wobbles a little, you don't want that to cause damage to the work or loss of control. Pulling a little away from the fence causes the bit to take a deeper bite in A and B, with consequences dangerous to the work and you - bad, while pulling away from the fence a little causes only a little less cut for C and D. This is not dangerous, and can be fixed with another pass.

These three things should be considered for any setup. In this case it leaves only C. There are situations where special equipment like power feeders can enable operations that would not be safe by hand, but if possible, stick with these ideas and don't count on featherboards to protect you.
04-13-2011 05:20 PM
GarethHarvey Matthew, our best ability is the ability to learn from our own mistakes.

We all make mistakes especially in the early days.
04-13-2011 07:14 AM
matt1710 Hi Mike

Hmmm...I must have been lucky. Actually, probably a good dose of luck, and the fact that I had on two feather boards (one vertical, one horizontal) and was using a push stick. The stock did get dragged away from the push stick - but only slowly - at about normal feed rate. As it moved away, it veered away from the fence, chattered a bit and was then spat out onto the RT and sat there.

I've learnt a lesson!

Matthew
04-12-2011 08:38 PM
mpbc48 Matthew,

How about pictures to show how risky what you did was;

http://www.routerforums.com/table-mo...fence-bit.html

Mike
04-12-2011 08:27 PM
Marco
Had not thought of it but glad you mentioned it

Quote:
Originally Posted by jschaben View Post
............. I would like to note that sometimes you can trap stock when it's not all that obvious you are going to do so. For example, If you want to make a dado a bit wider, you need to adjust the fence back so the bit would be taking off the edge closest to the front of the table. If just taking of a few thousands, it always felt natural to move the fence toward me until the first time I tried it and the thing ripped the stock out of my hand and did it's level best to put a hole in the far wall. Good luck
Thanks for bringing that up..... hopefully I will remember that before I try to widen a dado or at worst before I hurt myself!!!
04-12-2011 08:20 PM
jsorrell "C" is correct as the stock moves against the bit direction and the stock is not between the bit and fence.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome