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Thread: How to make router lift Cheap Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
09-25-2010 05:49 AM
Santť Hi
You can see my router lift "home made" at this address:
http://www.lescopeaux.asso.fr/Techni...Defonceuse.pdf

it costs 0$ and works very well, with adjustable height from the table top and quick lift for bit change

Daniel
09-10-2010 11:09 PM
bobj3 HI

Amazon.com: Lab Jack 97-5701: Office Products

Lab Jack – 6" x 6" ~ Lab Jack ~ General Supplies

Lab Jack with Removeable Platform and Support Rod - Laboratory Support Stand

=======

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrea Reynolds View Post
Hi,
What is a lab jack and where can I get one? Thanks!


09-10-2010 09:03 PM
Andrea Reynolds Hi,
What is a lab jack and where can I get one? Thanks!
06-18-2009 05:35 PM
Kenichi
on hold....

I'll keep that in mind as I go. Unfortunately, I am now in the process of moving, so the shop is closed until I complete the move, remodel a bathroom, fix the rotting wood under the stoop, frame and finish the basement where the shop will go, move the tools into the new shop, re-organize everything to fit in the smaller space, then, gods willing, I can get back to doing...
06-02-2009 10:29 PM
westend Kenichi,
I don't think you have to bastardize your charger. You should be able buy a "wall-wart" 110v-> 12v or 14 v DC transformer pretty cheap.
Also, you could take an attempt at "zapping" the battery of your 14v. setup, in oder to keep it all functioning, like Bob. There is information out there about that. I hesitate to link to it since results can be less than fortuitous.
06-02-2009 03:11 PM
Kenichi
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobj3 View Post
Hi Kenichi

I'm a cheap old SOB ,,,,,I don't keep the nut driver in the lift all the time I use it for what it was made for then when I need it in lift it just snaps in place.. and then back out...takes less than 3 sec.to put it into place..1,2,3 and it's set to do one more job

=====
He, he. I can appreciate that. I was a twigget in the Navy, so I like to keep my hands in things. The design and wiring of this would be a fun project. It would also feed my craving for gadgets, and even better it would be a homemade (sort of) gadget!
06-02-2009 11:56 AM
bobj3 Hi Kenichi

I'm a cheap old SOB ,,,,,I don't keep the nut driver in the lift all the time I use it for what it was made for then when I need it in lift it just snaps in place.. and then back out...takes less than 3 sec.to put it into place..1,2,3 and it's set to do one more job

=====

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenichi View Post
I've considered that, I just dont have one laying around to use. So, I thought if I have to buy something, I would buy a motor for that purpose.

It seems that no matter what I choose, I end up looking at a cost of around 60 bucks.

<thinking in progress.....>
Now that you mention the nut driver...

I do have a 14v Dewalt drill I dont use anymore. Since the battery is dying, and is too expensive to replace since I have an 18v drill, maybe I will look into that. It should be less torque and already has a clutch which eliminates the need for a deadman switch. I should be able to build a AC/DC converter using the battery charger. Hmm, I need to revisit John Nixon's motorized lift page again...

Thanks for the mental jump start....


06-02-2009 11:45 AM
Kenichi I've considered that, I just dont have one laying around to use. So, I thought if I have to buy something, I would buy a motor for that purpose.

It seems that no matter what I choose, I end up looking at a cost of around 60 bucks.

<thinking in progress.....>
Now that you mention the nut driver...

I do have a 14v Dewalt drill I dont use anymore. Since the battery is dying, and is too expensive to replace since I have an 18v drill, maybe I will look into that. It should be less torque and already has a clutch which eliminates the need for a deadman switch. I should be able to build a AC/DC converter using the battery charger. Hmm, I need to revisit John Nixon's motorized lift page again...

Thanks for the mental jump start....
06-02-2009 11:36 AM
bobj3 HI Kenichi

The scissor jack is a bit of a over kill that's why I used a small nut driver
with all the power I need to lift the 15 lb. router..

============

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenichi View Post
@bobj3 -- I thought the scissor jack would be a little big to fit in my router compartment on my router station, plus, I really like my router lift, except for the lack of motorization.

@BigJimAK -- Luckily, my current lift is out of warranty and is also a bastardized version from Rockler that has a smaller plate size than the current flock of router lifts. I was actually thinking of putting a reduction gear on the motor shaft to mate with and drive the primary gear already on the lift. That way, I would use the lift design as much as possibly, only changing the actuator mechanism to a motor instead of me with a crank arm. That should also minimize the gall out on the threads (as long as you have good dead man switches, as Howard suggested). I dont need it to go fast, just move precise.

@dutchman46 -- How about a 6' 4", 285lb hockey player to slap me upside the head when it reaches the top/bottom? Oi!


06-02-2009 11:30 AM
Kenichi @bobj3 -- I thought the scissor jack would be a little big to fit in my router compartment on my router station, plus, I really like my router lift, except for the lack of motorization.

@BigJimAK -- Luckily, my current lift is out of warranty and is also a bastardized version from Rockler that has a smaller plate size than the current flock of router lifts. I was actually thinking of putting a reduction gear on the motor shaft to mate with and drive the primary gear already on the lift. That way, I would use the lift design as much as possibly, only changing the actuator mechanism to a motor instead of me with a crank arm. That should also minimize the gall out on the threads (as long as you have good dead man switches, as Howard suggested). I dont need it to go fast, just move precise.

@dutchman46 -- How about a 6' 4", 285lb hockey player to slap me upside the head when it reaches the top/bottom? Oi!
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