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  Topic Review (Newest First)
09-07-2016 06:40 AM
hawkeye10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stick486 View Post
'bout time you made it back...
noe put the tree back where you got it from...
Thanks Stick. Your top notch in my book.
09-07-2016 01:50 AM
cocobolo1 If you can get your hands on some Black Cherry, you'll definitely be a happy camper.

Unlike a regular Cherry tree, Black Cherry grows straight and tall.

Years ago I was on a government construction site and the site super had a long, straight log laying outside his trailer. I asked what it was and what was it going to be used for, and he said Black Cherry and he was going to build another bedroom suite out of it. Apparently, he had done a suite previously.

Turned out that there were several of these Black Cherry trees on the site and he had saved this one for himself. He guided me to three others and said I could take one if I wished.

Next day I showed up with my chainsaw and took one down. Let me tell you, those are heavy trees when first felled. But that one made some truly beautiful wood once it had dried properly.
09-07-2016 12:15 AM
Stick486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Newman View Post
Colleagues: thanks for the information. Think I may take another look at cherry. Again, thanks.
Common Name(s): Black Cherry, Cherry, American Cherry

Scientific Name: Prunus serotina

Distribution: Eastern North America

Tree Size: 50-100 ft (15-30 m) tall, 3-5 ft (1-1.5 m) trunk diameter

Average Dried Weight: 35 lbs/ft3 (560 kg/m3)

Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .47, .56

Janka Hardness: 950 lbf (4,230 N)

Modulus of Rupture: 12,300 lbf/in2 (84.8 MPa)

Elastic Modulus: 1,490,000 lbf/in2 (10.30 GPa)

Crushing Strength: 7,110 lbf/in2 (49.0 MPa)

Shrinkage:Radial: 3.7%, Tangential: 7.1%, Volumetric: 11.5%, T/R Ratio: 1.9

Color/Appearance: Heartwood is a light pinkish brown when freshly cut, darkening to a medium reddish brown with time and upon exposure to light. Sapwood is a pale yellowish color.

Grain/Texture: The grain is usually straight and easy to work—with the exception of figured pieces with curly grain patterns. Has a fine, even texture with moderate natural luster.

Endgrain: Semi-ring-porous to diffuse-porous; small pores in no specific arrangement; solitary and radial multiples of 2-3; mineral/gum deposits occasionally present; growth rings usually distinct due to a concentration of earlywood pores; rays visible without lens; parenchyma absent.

Rot Resistance: Heartwood is rated as being very durable and resistant to decay.

Workability: Cherry is known as being one of the best all-around woods for workability. It is stable, straight-grained, and machines well. The only difficulties typically arise if the wood is being stained, as it can sometimes give blotchy results—using a sanding sealer prior to staining, or using a gel-based stain is recommended. Sapwood is common, and may contribute to a high wastage factor.

Odor: Has a mild, distinctive scent when being worked.

Allergies/Toxicity: Breathing Cherry’s sawdust has been associated with respiratory effects such as wheezing. See the articles Wood Allergies and Toxicity and Wood Dust Safety for more information.

Pricing/Availability: Since Cherry is a domestic lumber, prices should be moderate, though it should typically cost more than oak or maple, usually close to the price of walnut.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Cabinetry, fine furniture, flooring, interior millwork, veneer, turned objects, and small specialty wood items.

Comments: Black Cherry develops a rich reddish-brown patina as it ages that’s frequently imitated with wood stains on other hardwoods such as Yellow Poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera). This aging process can be accelerated by exposing the wood (in a judicious manner) to direct sunlight.

Related Species:

Apricot (Prunus armeniaca)
Plum (Prunus domestica)
Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium)
09-06-2016 09:34 PM
Ray Newman Colleagues: thanks for the information. Think I may take another look at cherry. Again, thanks.
09-06-2016 09:04 PM
DaninVan "'bout time you made it back..."
-Stick


...built a 16'x5' woodshed/storage shed for SWMBOJr and SiL, over in Victoria.
Most of my time I spent converting his old PT deck material into framing lumber. (2x6's into 2x3's and 5/4 decking into actual 1x4's)
I was amazed at how well the lumber had stood up to the weather; once you got past the surface weathering the stuff was in perfect condition!
Of course it rained a lot.
09-06-2016 08:18 PM
Stick486
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaninVan View Post
I like Alder. My HS woodworking teacher referred to it as ' Poor man's Maple'
It's used a lot for furniture frame manufacturing. Sofas etc.

!...nice cabinet, Reg!!
'bout time you made it back...
noe put the tree back where you got it from...
09-06-2016 08:03 PM
DaninVan I like Alder. My HS woodworking teacher referred to it as ' Poor man's Maple'
It's used a lot for furniture frame manufacturing. Sofas etc.

!...nice cabinet, Reg!!
09-06-2016 06:57 PM
Stick486
Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkeye10 View Post
Stick I can't find alder in there any where. I am hard of seeing so it could be there.
Common Name(s): Red Alder, Western Red Alder
Scientific Name: Alnus rubra
Distribution: Coastal western North America
Tree Size: 100-130 ft (30-40 m) tall, 2-3 ft (.6-1.0 m) trunk diameter
Average Dried Weight: 28 lbs/ft3 (450 kg/m3)
Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .37, .45
Janka Hardness: 590 lbf (2,620 N)
Modulus of Rupture: 9,800 lbf/in2 (67.6 MPa)
Elastic Modulus: 1,380,000 lbf/in2 (9.52 GPa)
Crushing Strength: 5,820 lbf/in2 (40.1 MPa)
Shrinkage: Radial: 4.4%, Tangential: 7.3%, Volumetric: 12.6%, T/R Ratio: 1.7

Color/Appearance: Red Alder tends to be a light tan to reddish brown; color darkens and reddens with age. There is no visible distinction between heartwood and sapwood. The overall grain pattern and appearance is similar to Birch (Betula genus)—though redder than Birch—and both genera are derived from the same family, Betulaceae.

Grain/Texture: Grain is generally straight, with a moderately fine, uniform texture.

Endgrain: Diffuse-porous; small pores commonly in clusters or radial multiples of 2-4; growth rings distinct; smaller rays not visible without lens, larger aggregate rays less common but easily visible without lens; parenchyma banded (marginal), apotracheal parenchyma diffuse-in-aggregates.

Rot Resistance: Red Alder is rated non-durable to perishable regarding decay resistance, and freshly cut logs should be quickly converted into lumber and dried to prevent staining or decay in the wood.

Workability: Red Alder is very easy to work with both hand and machine tools; it sands especially easy. The wood is rather soft, however, and care must be taken to avoid denting it in some applications. Red Alder has excellent gluing, staining, and finishing properties; it also turns well and behaves similar to Black Cherry.

Odor: No characteristic odor.

Allergies/Toxicity: Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, Alder in the Alnus genus has been reported to cause eye, skin, and respiratory irritation. See the articles Wood Allergies and Toxicity and Wood Dust Safety for more information.

Pricing/Availability: Red Alder is usually sold in two different grades: knotty, and clear. Knotty Red Alder is likely to be very inexpensive, on par with other domestic utility woods such as Poplar or Aspen. Clear Red Alder is likely to cost a bit more, closer to other cabinet hardwoods such as Birch or Maple.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Veneer, plywood, furniture, cabinetry, millwork, pallets, musical instruments (electric guitar bodies), and chip/pulp wood.

Comments: Red Alder is the most abundant hardwood in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States, and is a commercially important lumber.

Related Species:

European Alder (Alnus glutinosa)
Nepalese Alder (Alnus nepalensis)
09-06-2016 06:37 PM
hawkeye10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stick486 View Post
here...

,
Stick I can't find alder in there any where. I am hard of seeing so it could be there.
09-06-2016 03:23 PM
MT Stringer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Newman View Post
Colleagues: does anyone have any experience working with alder?

I hear it referred to as the "poor man's cherry." A local lumber yard advertises a good selection of dimensional stock. But I have not examined it and compared it to cherry, or other hardwoods.

Heard that it too soft for cabinets, but just how soft is "too soft?"

Seriously thinking about building a new tool cabinet and I would like to abstain from utilizing plywood if at all possible.

Thanks for any help.
Well, yes I have.

Note: This is a long thread.
http://www.routerforums.com/show-n-t...n-remodel.html
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

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