Router Forums - Reply to Topic
Thread: He's Back!!!! Cutting Board Questions Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
12-01-2016 01:00 PM
coxhaus I believe in multiple glues for different jobs. I have Titebond I, II, and III. Titebond II is only cause they were out of Titebond III.

My dad in the 60 and 70s used one glue for everything. Once in a while he used epoxy. I can't think of the glue right now, senior moment.
12-01-2016 11:54 AM
Stick486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
I advocate using different glues with differing properties for specific jobs.
way to go Charles...
12-01-2016 11:34 AM
Cherryville Chuck
Quote:
Originally Posted by big K View Post
Hey Chuck, if you are suggesting using Weldwood Plastic Resin glue for butcher blocks, I wouldn't. That glue is a ureaformaldehyde formula, definitely not considered food safe.
I did not suggest that, only that some people use it for everything they do just like some have said on this forum that T3 is the glue they use for everything. I advocate using different glues with differing properties for specific jobs.
12-01-2016 11:21 AM
Stick486
Quote:
I have been told by several reputable woodworkers that you should not attempt to run an end grain cutting board through a planer. The knives will grab the course ends and rip them to sheds, such as a router will do on an end grain cut.
if you put the board in a sacrificial carrier frame you'll achieve success and if your planer has a spiral or helix head you'll move to the head of the class..
12-01-2016 10:01 AM
Knot2square I have been told by several reputable woodworkers that you should not attempt to run an end grain cutting board through a planer. The knives will grab the course ends and rip them to sheds, such as a router will do on an end grain cut. It would ber flustrating to go through all that work, only to have your project ruined by a planer. I've been told to sand with a drum sander and if not available, use a belt sander, then a random orbital sander.
If a drum sander is not available, see if someone close has one that will allow you, or them at a nominal cost to sand for you. Many cabinet shops have them.
12-01-2016 09:57 AM
vchiarelli Here's a link to Titebond's technical guide. Lots of information regarding common terms, open time, clamping time, etc. Click on the image of the technical guide and it will take you to a PDF that you can open or save. The PDF shows the difference between various Titebond products and in the question and answer section there is an item that explains how to determine when your product was made. Most Titebond products have a shelf life of 2 years according to the guide.

Titebond - News Article > Need technical assistance?

Vince
12-01-2016 09:36 AM
DaninVan Mea culpa! I think I wasn't very helpful in my last comment ...
My understanding is that 'open time' in fact means the time it takes for an adhesive to skin over, after which time it's effectiveness is seriously compromised.
The other term, 'total assembly time' refers to the time after which the bond must not be disturbed. In other words no more tinkering.
Opinions differing happily accepted.
12-01-2016 04:59 AM
big K Titebond III actually cures to a stronger bond then II, and III also has longer working times then II. I think that TB II is actually rated as water-resistant, whereas TB III is rated as waterproof. Open time is generally how long that you have to get your glued pieces into contact with each other and in rough alignment, total assembly time is time until all of the clamps are tightened up, if I remember correctly. Hard to be sure since I do my woodworking here in Denver where all of the PVA glues go about twice as stated on the label, due to how dry our climate is. Glue ups in the Mile High Region are never boring.

If you have access to a larger drum sander, one thing that you can do is glue a sacrificial border of something cheap like poplar around the outside of the butcher block blank before sanding. This will prevent the sander from popping off pieces of the outside boards due to grain orientation. Then rip that sacrificial frame off of the butcher block and sand that like usual. I use this technique when I make end grain butcher blocks then use my baby timesaver to flatten the blocks after after glue up.

There are some great plans for patterned end grain butcher blocks that use cherry, walnut, and sugar maple (rock maple). One of the woodworking magazines had a great article on that using repeating patterns of these three species several years ago, the final product was quite impressive, and they were pretty quick to make.
12-01-2016 04:20 AM
big K Hey Chuck, if you are suggesting using Weldwood Plastic Resin glue for butcher blocks, I wouldn't. That glue is a ureaformaldehyde formula, definitely not considered food safe.
12-01-2016 03:32 AM
coxhaus How is Total Assembly Time different than open time?
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome