Router Forums - Reply to Topic
Thread: Half Fence For Table Saw Ripping Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
12-29-2017 02:27 PM
JIMMIEM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stick486 View Post
yes... but not into more than ¼ of the blade for general use... overall ¼ of the way seemed to work a lot better than half way
I prefer 8/4 or better for that ''board''... whole numbers for the math is a plus...
it's about the best set up you can do for wild grain ripping or wood under compression... it gives the erratic piece some place to go w/o the usual bind you get w/ a full length fence...
good to better than great for small piece cutting and for making thin strip...
for thin strips and small piece cuts the end of the add on needs to be just short/shy of the lead edge of the blade so that the strips/pieces freely fall away from the blade and are not in any way touching the end of the add on at the same time...

for the short/shorter strip/piece cuts...
set the fence...
employ your miter gauge...
set the material to be cut to the fence and push through w/ the miter gauge..
for long/longest strip/piece cuts use your push stick or Gripper to completion...
for cuts w/o the miter gauge set the add on to the ¼ position...

NOTES...
the add on needs to be a lot thicker than the cut off... and I mean a lot... as in way lot...
for really small pieces rig your shop vac to collect the drops...
for really thin strips... rig a wedge attached to the drop side your spliter/riving knife...
the lead edge of the wedge needs to be at zero or near zero thickness...
the teeth on the blade are wider then the blade body is thick... capitalize on this...
the wedge forces the strip to peel away from the blade and not to be ''grabbed by the back side teeth which then will throw throw the piece back at you... kick back.. what a miserable incident...
if the wedge deal isn't to your liking ... adjust the lead edge of your spliter/riving knife flush to the drop side of the blade and kant the trailing edge of your spliter/riving knife maybe a couple of degrees into the cut...
this works for long thins... the wedge on short thins...
to get a kant, all it takes is a thin washer under your spliter/riving knife and held in place w/ it's mounting screw...
hyper thins that are subject to the air flow/currents generated by the blade need to be caught by the shop vac...
I don't suggest nor recommend using compressed air to move the cuts away from the blade because you will have very little control on which way they will move...
sometimes they'll move away from the blade...
sometimes they'll flip back into the blade resulting in kick back......
need we mention a zero clearance inserts for these operations...
Thank You.
12-29-2017 12:41 PM
hawkeye10
Quote:
Originally Posted by tooler2 View Post
It was not my intention to be rude so I am sorry if I came across that way. Please realise that many people reading this forum are not experienced and I feel a duty to warn of unsafe practice so they do not get hurt. A table saw is not a machine to use to make a straight edge, it requires a straight edge to use against the fence. If you do not have a jointer it is so easy to simply tack the non straight board onto a straight one and run it through the saw that way. I have considerable experience myself. I own a 1930s GreenLee 493, two Wadkin PKs one from the forties the other from the fifties, and an Oliver 260d from the sixties. All of them came from the factory with short fences so this is not a new nor a UK thing. All of them run 18'' blades at 3600 rpm so the surface speed of the teeth is nearly 17000 ft/min compared to about 10500 ft/min for a typical 10'' saw so it would not take long to burn a blade that is worth many hundreds of dollars. These bigger saws do not slow down when pinched. I also own a Diehle straight line rip saw that is designed to put a straight edge on a rough board. It has a fence less than one foot long that stops 18'' before the blade so that it cannot interfere with the power feed chains that carry the wood through the 15hp direct drive blade. This saw is set up as a glue line rip saw, it is set to produce boards that are hollow by about .005'' over 6' long to give an improved glue joint when clamped. To tune machines like this requires a good grasp of the physics involved in milling lumber. Wood is a dynamic material.
Rob

Rob you must have a really nice shop to hold all those old machines. I would appreciate it if you could post some pictures of those old machines. I love seeing them.
12-29-2017 12:31 PM
Stick486
Quote:
Originally Posted by tooler2 View Post
While we are at it, lets discuss how high the blade should be raised to make a cut!
Rob
at least 75% of the gullet showing at blade TDC to max of 95% of gullet......
12-29-2017 12:23 PM
Stick486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
The Unifence is about 36" long I'd say without going to measure it. I can cut a full sheet of panel with it pretty accurately (it took a few tries to master the technique) but sometimes I need one a little longer. Trying to straighten out a warped board for example.
why risk binding and kick back...
time for a sled, carrier, joiner, joiner substitute or a smoother/joiner plane.......
let's be safe out there...

.
12-29-2017 12:18 PM
Stick486
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaninVan View Post
Rob; or just use a normal fence.
I understand your argument, and I'm not saying that it doesn't have any merit. I AM saying that I'm very happy with my long fence (kicked a few thou out from the blade at the back) and i'm not planning on changing any time soon. I have neither the space nor the spare cash to plow into a $5K TS.
but you do have the ability to modify what you have....
12-29-2017 12:15 PM
Stick486
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaninVan View Post
Jim; I'm on your team! In spite of what Rob says, If I'm running a large panel through the saw I want it supported ALL THE WAY THROUGH ITS LENGTH!
To say that a 4x8 sheet won't move left to right, just because a 10" section is interacting with the blade is a fantasy.
we both know that both fences have their place...
and why would you want to run a large panel anyways...
you 20 years old again???
there are so many ways to break down panels w/o a TS...
12-29-2017 12:13 PM
Stick486
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEBCWD View Post
Really hard to cut dados or any cut that does not go all the way through the board.
huh???
12-29-2017 12:12 PM
Stick486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Q View Post
Not sure a half fence would work well with grr-rippers

In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
it does... just don't follow through...
12-29-2017 12:09 PM
Stick486
Quote:
Originally Posted by JIMMIEM View Post
I just came across a table saw technique that I was unaware of.......use of a Half Fence. An article I saw said that Half Fences are a common feature on European table saws. To simulate the Half Fence on a Full Fence table saw a flat board is clamped to the rip fence...the board extends from the front end of the rip fence to the midpoint of the saw blade. Anybody tried it?
yes... but not into more than ¼ of the blade for general use... overall ¼ of the way seemed to work a lot better than half way
I prefer 8/4 or better for that ''board''... whole numbers for the math is a plus...
it's about the best set up you can do for wild grain ripping or wood under compression... it gives the erratic piece some place to go w/o the usual bind you get w/ a full length fence...
good to better than great for small piece cutting and for making thin strip...
for thin strips and small piece cuts the end of the add on needs to be just short/shy of the lead edge of the blade so that the strips/pieces freely fall away from the blade and are not in any way touching the end of the add on at the same time...

for the short/shorter strip/piece cuts...
set the fence...
employ your miter gauge...
set the material to be cut to the fence and push through w/ the miter gauge..
for long/longest strip/piece cuts use your push stick or Gripper to completion...
for cuts w/o the miter gauge set the add on to the ¼ position...

NOTES...
the add on needs to be a lot thicker than the cut off... and I mean a lot... as in way lot...
for really small pieces rig your shop vac to collect the drops...
for really thin strips... rig a wedge attached to the drop side your spliter/riving knife...
the lead edge of the wedge needs to be at zero or near zero thickness...
the teeth on the blade are wider then the blade body is thick... capitalize on this...
the wedge forces the strip to peel away from the blade and not to be ''grabbed by the back side teeth which then will throw throw the piece back at you... kick back.. what a miserable incident...
if the wedge deal isn't to your liking ... adjust the lead edge of your spliter/riving knife flush to the drop side of the blade and kant the trailing edge of your spliter/riving knife maybe a couple of degrees into the cut...
this works for long thins... the wedge on short thins...
to get a kant, all it takes is a thin washer under your spliter/riving knife and held in place w/ it's mounting screw...
hyper thins that are subject to the air flow/currents generated by the blade need to be caught by the shop vac...
I don't suggest nor recommend using compressed air to move the cuts away from the blade because you will have very little control on which way they will move...
sometimes they'll move away from the blade...
sometimes they'll flip back into the blade resulting in kick back......
need we mention a zero clearance inserts for these operations...
12-29-2017 10:32 AM
JIMMIEM Stick,
Here it is
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome